Technology Against Terrorism: Structuring Security

Technology Against Terrorism: Structuring Security

Date: January 1992
Creator: United States. Congress. Office of Technology Assessment.
Description: This report is devoted primarily to three other topics: interagency coordination of efforts in counterterrorist research and development, integrated security systems, and the role of human factors in aviation security. In addition, it furnishes details on a number of technologies that play a role in counterterrorism.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The 9/11 Commission Report: Final Report of the National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States

The 9/11 Commission Report: Final Report of the National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States

Date: July 22, 2004
Creator: National Commission on Terrorist Attacks upon the United States
Description: The official Government edition of the Final Report of the National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States (also known as the 9-11 Commission, an independent, bipartisan commission created by congressional legislation and the signature of President George W. Bush in late 2002), provides a full and complete account of the circumstances surrounding the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, including preparedness for and the immediate response to the attacks. Provides recommendations designed to guard against future attacks.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Programming homeland security: Citizen preparedness and the threat of terrorism.

Programming homeland security: Citizen preparedness and the threat of terrorism.

Date: August 2007
Creator: Register, David
Description: This thesis tests the necessity of terrorism in articulating Homeland Security citizenship. Chapter 1 orients the study, reviewing relevant literature. Chapter 2 examines the USDHS Ready Kids program's Homeland Security Guide, mapping a baseline for how Homeland Security citizenship is articulated with the overt use of terrorism. Chapter 3 investigates the USDHS Ready Kids program, charting the logic of Homeland Security citizenship when the threat of terrorism is removed from sense making about preparedness. Chapter 4 compares the findings of Chapters 2 and 3, evaluating the similarities and differences between these two articulations of Homeland Security citizenship and concluding that the logic that cements Homeland Security into American society does not depend on the threat of terrorism against the United States.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries