International Convention Against Doping in Sport: Issues for Congress

International Convention Against Doping in Sport: Issues for Congress

Date: May 28, 2008
Creator: Wyler, Liana Sun
Description: The International Convention Against Doping in Sport seeks to harmonize anti-doping commitments for non-professional sports at the international level. This Convention was adopted by the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) in 2005 and entered in force on February 1, 2007. Issues that could arise as the Senate considers the treaty include its relationship to anti-doping regulations in professional sports, potential consequences that non-ratification could pose to the United States, and the legitimacy and effectiveness of current international anti-doping activities.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
International Convention Against Doping in Sport: Issues for Congress

International Convention Against Doping in Sport: Issues for Congress

Date: June 26, 2008
Creator: Wyler, Liana Sun
Description: The International Convention Against Doping in Sport seeks to harmonize anti-doping commitments for non-professional sports at the international level. Issues that could arise as the Senate considers the Convention include its relationship to anti-doping regulations in professional sports, potential consequences that non-ratification could pose to the United States, and the legitimacy and effectiveness of current international anti-doping activities.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
International Convention Against Doping in Sport: Issues for Congress

International Convention Against Doping in Sport: Issues for Congress

Date: August 11, 2008
Creator: Wyler, Liana Sun
Description: The International Convention Against Doping in Sport seeks to harmonize anti-doping commitments for non-professional sports at the international level. Issues that may continue to arise as policymakers evaluate the Convention include its relationship to anti-doping regulations in professional sports and the legitimacy and effectiveness of current international anti-doping activities.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Biomedical Research Group, Health Division annual report 1954

Biomedical Research Group, Health Division annual report 1954

Date: December 1955
Creator: Langham, W. H. & Storer, J. B.
Description: This report covers the activities of the Biomedical Research Group (H-4) of the Health Division during the period January 1 through December 31, 1954. Organizationally, Group H-4 is divided into five sections, namely, Biochemistry, Radiobiology, Radiopathology, Biophysics, and Organic Chemistry. The activities of the Group are summarized under the headings of the various sections. The general nature of each section`s program, publications, documents and reports originating from its members, and abstracts and summaries of the projects pursued during the year are presented.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Review of Androgenic Anabolic Steroid Use

Review of Androgenic Anabolic Steroid Use

Date: July 31, 2001
Creator: Borges, T.; Eisele, G. & Byrd, C.
Description: An area that has been overlooked within personnel security evaluations is employee use of androgenic-anabolic steroids (AAS). Current drug testing within the federal government does not include testing for anabolic steroids, and the difficulties to implement such testing protocols-not to mention the cost involved-make AAS testing highly improbable. The basis of this report is to bring to the forefront the damage that anabolic steroids can cause from both a physical and a psychological standpoint. Most individuals who use AASs do so to increase their muscle mass because they wish to gain some type of competitive edge during athletic competition or they wish to enhance their physical features for self-satisfaction and self-esteem (i.e., body building). Security officers are one group of men who often take high doses of anabolic steroids, according to the Second Report of the Senate Standing Committee (1990). The negative psychological characteristics for AAS use is extensive and includes prominent hostility, aggressiveness, irritability, euphoria, grandiose beliefs, hyperactivity, reckless behavior, increased sexual appetite, unpredictability, poor impulse control, mood fluctuations, and insomnia. The drug may invoke a sense of power and invincibility (Leckman and Scahill, 1990). Depressive symptoms, such as anhedonia, fatigue, impaired concentration, decreased libido, and even suicidality (Pope ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department