The Control of Blowing Soils

The Control of Blowing Soils

Date: 1910
Creator: Free, E. E. (Edward Elway), b. 1883 & Westgate, J. M.
Description: "The rapid extension of agricultural operations into the sections of the United States where the rainfall is so limited as to make the problem of soil blowing a serious one has led to numerous calls for information concerning the best methods of solution." -- p. 2. Control of blowing of both sandy soils and soils from newly cleared lands are among the topics discussed.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Crops Against the Wind on the Southern Great Plains

Crops Against the Wind on the Southern Great Plains

Date: 1939
Creator: Rule, Glenn K. (Glenn Kenton), 1893-
Description: "This bulletin briefly traces the circumstances which have created the soil problems in the southern Great Plains and shows how the hand of man has hastened present troubles. But it goes further and deals with the methods now being used to solve the problem on nature's own terms." -- p. 2-3. Some of the solutions discussed include contour farming, terraces, water conservation techniques, crop lines, and revegetation.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Cover Crops for Soil Conservation

Cover Crops for Soil Conservation

Date: 1936
Creator: Kell, Walter V., 1889- & McKee, Roland
Description: "Cover crops are crops sown or planted in thick stands for the purpose of protecting and enriching the soil.... That the use of cover crops is a most efficient means for preventing soil erosion and increasing soil fertility is well known; yet this practice is not nearly so widely and extensively followed as it should be. The kinds of cover crops that should be used and the method of utilizing them to the best advantage varies in different regions, according to climatic conditions but almost everywhere cover cropping in some form can be profitably followed." -- p. 1. The bulletin considers cover crops as either legumes or non-legumes.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Farmer Looks Ahead

The Farmer Looks Ahead

Date: 1937
Creator: United States. Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Description: This bulletin provides criteria by which farmers may determine how much they should plan to produce in a given year. There "are four major yardsticks: 1) How much should farmers produce, thinking only of the requirements of domestic consumers, plus; 2) What they can expect to ship to foreign countries in the next few years? 3) How much should they produce, thinking only of the requirements of soil conservation? 4) How much should farmers produce, thinking only of their incomes?" -- p. 3
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Ponds for Wildlife

Ponds for Wildlife

Date: 1941
Creator: Allan, Philip Farley, 1909- & Davis, Cecil N.
Description: "The first purpose of this bulletin is to show how farmers and ranchers may protect their ponds from sedimentation, soil erosion, and water loss through the use of vegetation suitable as food and shelter for wildlife; the second is to give some information on the management of wildlife in farm ponds. Unless otherwise stated, the information contained in this bulletin pertains to the water area, or pond proper, and the pond area, or the land immediately adjacent to the pond and ordinarily contained within a fence." -- p. ii
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Stubble-Mulch Farming for Soil Defense

Stubble-Mulch Farming for Soil Defense

Date: 1942
Creator: Carter, L. S. (Logan Sampson), 1906- & McDole, G. R.
Description: "Stubble-mulch farming, spectacular in its recent spread across the West, has sound scientific support. In one form or another, it has been demonstrating its advantages on experimental plots and in isolated field trials for many years. It is a practice that furthers the highest crop and livestock production compatible with the principle of soil security. It is a simple but effective method that will help us to avoid in the present emergency the disastrous aftermaths of the plow-up program of the 1920's. Materials for mulching are at hand -- products of the land itself -- waiting to be used for the retention of crop-making moisture and soil. Equipment can be bought on the market, or it can be rigged up by the farmer himself. Stubble-mulch farming can be fitted into a general conservation system -- applied to grain fields, row-crop land, and strip-croppered areas. It is flexible and economical, requires less mule power or machine power." -- p. ii
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Strip Cropping for War Production

Strip Cropping for War Production

Date: 1943
Creator: Tower, Harold E. & Gardner, Harry H.
Description: "In the nation's effort to produce adequate quantities of all agricultural products to meet the war needs of the United Nations, conservation assumes added importance. Advancements in the management of croplands to conserve soil and moisture, which have come about in recent years as a result of experimentation and the experiences of many farmers, show that conservation increases crop yields. Strip cropping is one of the conservation practices. In its various forms and patterns, it is applicable to a large area of the United States. With the farmer rests the major responsibility of obtaining conservation on the land. Each farmer should examine for himself the need of strip cropping his cultivated land and in doing so should find the information contained in this bulletin helpful. The kinds of strip cropping, the factors influencing their use, methods of application, value in conserving soil and moisture, and the adaptation of strip cropping to the northeastern and north-central, the southeastern and western Gulf, the Great Plains, and the far Western States are discussed." -- p. ii
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Soil Defense in the Northeast

Soil Defense in the Northeast

Date: 1938
Creator: Rule, Glenn K. (Glenn Kenton), 1893-
Description: This bulletin discusses methods of soil conservation in the northeastern United States that can prevent erosion. Soil conservation practices vary with the type of agriculture being used. In addition to general farming, conservation for dairying, orcharding, market gardening, and single-crop farming are discussed.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Toward Soil Security on the Northern Great Plains

Toward Soil Security on the Northern Great Plains

Date: 1941
Creator: Rule, Glenn K. (Glenn Kenton), 1893-
Description: "This bulletin deals with soil and water conservation problems which relate to agriculture of the northern Great Plains [of the United States]." -- p. i. "The major portion of this bulletin, beginning on page 18, is devoted to a discussion of the controls and cures for land misuse. These suggested practices, in the main, represent the methods of control that are now being used in the several demonstration areas of the Soil Conservation Service. The use of these practices in a few specific demonstration areas is included in the section beginning on page 47. The last section (p. 76) points out a democratic procedure whereby landowners and operators may effect a more appropriate use of the land through soil conservation districts." -- p. 2
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Sand-Dune Reclamation in the Southern Great Plains

Sand-Dune Reclamation in the Southern Great Plains

Date: 1939
Creator: Whitfield, Charles J. & Perrin, John A.
Description: "Among the most striking manifestations of the destruction of soils and crops by the windstorms of recent years are the gigantic sand dunes that have formed on some of the lighter soils of the Great Plains. Specialists of the Soil Conservation Service who were assigned to a study of the problem have been successful in devising methods by which these immense piles of sand, which have covered cultivated lands and good native sod, can be leveled and stabilized. Of still greater value to the farmers and ranchers in areas subject to this soil shifting are the methods of cultivation and land use that recent study and experiments have revealed as the best means of protection against the formation of dunes. This bulletin is written for the benefit of those farmers and ranchers who are faced with the problem of protecting their lands against possible damage from dune formation of with the more immediate problem of restoring lands that have been made temporarily useless by the invasion of these monstrous wind-blown piles of sand." -- p. i
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Saving Soil with Sod in the Ohio Valley Region

Saving Soil with Sod in the Ohio Valley Region

Date: 1939
Creator: Welton, Kenneth
Description: Clearing of forests, overgrazing, and soil erosion have greatly depleted the soil of the Ohio Valley in the United States. Farmers should implement agricultural practices that encourage the growth of sod, which has the potential to restore the soil. "The use of grass in increasing the productivity of farm land, in conserving soil on pasture and cropland, and in protecting smaller eroded or erodible areas is discussed in this bulletin." -- p. i
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Terracing for Soil and Water Conservation

Terracing for Soil and Water Conservation

Date: 1938
Creator: Hamilton, C. L.
Description: This bulletin describes terracing methods that are able to combat soil erosion and conserve water. There are three types of terraces (drainage, absorptive, and bench) and plans, specifications, construction practices are provided in the bulletin.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Terrace Outlets and Farm Drainageways

Terrace Outlets and Farm Drainageways

Date: 1939
Creator: Hamilton, C. L.
Description: "This bulletin is a compilation of the best information now available for farmers on the construction and use of terrace outlets and the protection, improvement, and maintenance of other sloping drainageways. The term "drainageways" as used in this bulletin refers primarily to channels of surface drainage in the upper reaches of watersheds or in unit drainage basins. 'Outlet' is a more restricted term and refers only to drainageways that are provided to receive and convey the discharge from the ends of terraces. The scope of this material is limited to surface runoff-disposal measures required in upland or rolling terrain where slopes are steep enough to cause channel erosion. It does not cover surface drainage or underdrainage of flatlands where natural drainage is inadequate." -- p. ii
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Native and Adapted Grasses for Conservation of Soil and Moisture in the Great Plains and Western States

Native and Adapted Grasses for Conservation of Soil and Moisture in the Great Plains and Western States

Date: 1939
Creator: Hoover, Max M. (Max Manley), 1895-
Description: "The information given in this bulletin should enable farmers in the Great Plains and Western States to select from the more common species of grasses some one or more suited to their needs [for soil and water conservation]. Common harvesting equipment and farm machinery can be adapted to the proper handling of native grasses. This brings the cost of such work within the means of most farmers." -- p. i. Among the grasses discussed are wheatgrass, buffalo grass, bluestem, grama, Bermuda grass, wild rye, hilaria, Sudan grass, bluegrass, panic grasses, dropseed, and needlegrass.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Wildlife Conservation Through Erosion Control in the Piedmont

Wildlife Conservation Through Erosion Control in the Piedmont

Date: 1937
Creator: Stevens, Ross O.
Description: "Erosion has left scars on a majority of farms in the Southeast. Too poor to produce crops, the eroding spots are usually abandoned. Unless they are treated to stop further washing of the soil they grow steadily larger and continually rob the farmer of more of his land. Fortunately, soil conservation and wildlife management can be effectively combined, and otherwise worthless areas made to produce a crop of game, fur bearers, and other desirable types of wildlife. The general principles of wildlife management on the farm are described in Farmers' Bulletins 1719 and 1759. The purpose of this bulletin is to show how gullies, terrace outlets, waterways, eroding field borders, pastures, and woodlands in the Piedmont region may be protected against erosion through the use of vegetation that will also provide food and cover for wildlife." -- p. ii
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
More Food Through Conservation Farming

More Food Through Conservation Farming

Date: 1943
Creator: Semple, Arthur T. (Arthur Truman), 1895-
Description: Revised edition. "This bulletin discusses in general the ways in which conservation measures increase crop production, improve pasture and range, and maintain the productivity of the soil." -- p. i. Many of these topics are discussed with regard to the war production efforts undertaken by the federal government of the United States during the World War II Era.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Soil Defense in the Pacific Southwest

Soil Defense in the Pacific Southwest

Date: 1940
Creator: Rule, Glenn K. (Glenn Kenton), 1893- & Netterstrom, Ralph W.
Description: "The Pacific Southwest, as considered in this bulletin, embraces the two States -- California and Nevada. Evidences of soil and water losses are briefly touched upon, as are the factors contributing to these losses. The bulk of the bulletin deals with measures of defense that are now being employed on farms and range land within project areas of the Soil Conservation Service and in areas where members of Civilian Conservation Corps camps have been assigned to erosion-control activities." -- p. i. Some of the measures discussed include the use of cover crops, contour farming, crop rotation, subsoiling, strip cropping, and terracing.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Implements and Methods of Tillage to Control Soil Blowing on the Northern Great Plains

Implements and Methods of Tillage to Control Soil Blowing on the Northern Great Plains

Date: 1938
Creator: Cole, John S. (John Selden) & Morgan, George W.
Description: This bulletin tools and methods of tilling which can help reduce or control soil blowing and soil erosion on farms in the northern Great Plains of the United States. Among the crops discussed with relation to tilling methods are beans, corn, sorghum, potatoes, alfalfa, and sweet clover.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Regrassing for Soil Protection in the Southwest

Regrassing for Soil Protection in the Southwest

Date: 1942
Creator: Flory, Evan L. & Marshall, Charles G.
Description: "This bulletin is designed to help the stockmen and farmers, of the Southwest [United States] particularly, in reestablishing depleted ranges where unfavorable climatic conditions and heavy demands on the range have served to make improvement of the range by natural means a slow and difficult process. It discusses the latest methods of artificial revegetation that have proved most effective in regrassing the ranges. It also discusses the more promising grasses and indicates that areas to which they are adapted. It explains the latest methods for harvesting seed and establishing grass on various sites under a wide range of conditions as to elevation, temperature, rainfall, and soils." -- p. i
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Reseeding Range Lands of the Intermountain Region

Reseeding Range Lands of the Intermountain Region

Date: 1939
Creator: Stewart, George; Walker, R. H. (Rudger Harper), 1902- & Price, Raymond
Description: "Revegetating deteriorated range lands by sowing adaptable, nutritious, and palatable grasses is vital for adequate forage production in the Intermountain region, for profitable livestock raising, and as a safeguard against flood and erosion damage. The effect of serious droughts, greatly aggravated by overstocking, has resulted in the replacement of valuable perennial grasses by annual weeds and grasses that have much less value as forage for livestock or for proper soil protection. The abandonment of unsuccessful submarginal croplands has also added greatly to the vast acreage of deteriorated but potentially productive range lands of the region in need of revegetation. Proper guides and procedure for revegetating run-down ranges and abandoned dry farms by artificial reseeding are necessary to safeguard against costly pitfalls and to insure reasonable success. The procedures herein outlined are based on the experiences and research to date and should prove helpful to those administering range lands and producing livestock in the region comprising Utah, Nevada, southern Idaho, and southwestern Wyoming, commonly referred to as the Intermountain region." -- p. i
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Dust storms come from the poorer lands.

Dust storms come from the poorer lands.

Date: September 1949
Creator: Finnell, H. H. (Henry Howard), b. 1894.
Description: Describes the different classifications of land and the effect soil erosion has on the quality of land and its future for crop production. Contains the results of an extensive study.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Pastures to hold and enrich the soil.

Pastures to hold and enrich the soil.

Date: March 1942
Creator: Semple, Arthur T. (Arthur Truman), 1895- & Hein, M. A. (Mason August), b. 1894.
Description: Discusses methods for maintaining grazing pastures, enriching the soil, and preventing the erosion of soil.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Interseeding legumes in corn.

Interseeding legumes in corn.

Date: July 1958
Creator: Van Doren, C. A. (Cornelius Austin), 1905- & Hays, O. E.
Description: Explains the practice and procedures for interseeding legumes and grasses in wide-row corn.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Irrigated pastures for forage production and soil conservation.

Irrigated pastures for forage production and soil conservation.

Date: September 1945
Creator: Hamilton, J. G. (James Guy), b. 1891.; Brown, Grover F., 1905-; Tower, Harold E. (Harold Everett), 1904- & Collins, Wilkie, Jr.
Description: Discusses the importance of increasing farm productivity to meet needs created by World War II. Provides suggestions for the establishment and management of pastures, including irrigation, fertilization, and the use of grasses and legumes.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
FIRST PREV 1 2 NEXT LAST