For higher production : soil and water conservation.

For higher production : soil and water conservation.

Date: September 1952
Creator: United States. Dept. of Agriculture.
Description: Describes how to conserve water and soil on a farm or ranch in order to maintain higher production of crops and livestock.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Using crop residues for soil defense.

Using crop residues for soil defense.

Date: August 1942
Creator: Duley, F. L. & Russel, J. C.
Description: Describes how leaving crop residue in a field can help prevent soil erosion due to rainfall; and describes the equipment that can be used in this practice.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Grass waterways in soil conservation.

Grass waterways in soil conservation.

Date: June 1960
Creator: Atkins, Maurice Donald, 1912- & Coyle, James J.
Description: Describes how to establish grass-protected waterways on farm fields to prevent soil erosion.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Wood chips for the land.

Wood chips for the land.

Date: June 1952
Creator: McIntyre, Arthur Clifton, 1894-
Description: Describes how farmers and ranchers can use wood chips to prevent soil erosion, as bedding for livestock, and as a way to make soil richer for producing crops.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Control of Blowing Soils

The Control of Blowing Soils

Date: 1910
Creator: Free, E. E. (Edward Elway), b. 1883 & Westgate, J. M.
Description: "The rapid extension of agricultural operations into the sections of the United States where the rainfall is so limited as to make the problem of soil blowing a serious one has led to numerous calls for information concerning the best methods of solution." -- p. 2. Control of blowing of both sandy soils and soils from newly cleared lands are among the topics discussed.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Crops Against the Wind on the Southern Great Plains

Crops Against the Wind on the Southern Great Plains

Date: 1939
Creator: Rule, Glenn K. (Glenn Kenton), 1893-
Description: "This bulletin briefly traces the circumstances which have created the soil problems in the southern Great Plains and shows how the hand of man has hastened present troubles. But it goes further and deals with the methods now being used to solve the problem on nature's own terms." -- p. 2-3. Some of the solutions discussed include contour farming, terraces, water conservation techniques, crop lines, and revegetation.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Cover Crops for Soil Conservation

Cover Crops for Soil Conservation

Date: 1936
Creator: Kell, Walter V., 1889- & McKee, Roland
Description: "Cover crops are crops sown or planted in thick stands for the purpose of protecting and enriching the soil.... That the use of cover crops is a most efficient means for preventing soil erosion and increasing soil fertility is well known; yet this practice is not nearly so widely and extensively followed as it should be. The kinds of cover crops that should be used and the method of utilizing them to the best advantage varies in different regions, according to climatic conditions but almost everywhere cover cropping in some form can be profitably followed." -- p. 1. The bulletin considers cover crops as either legumes or non-legumes.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Farmer Looks Ahead

The Farmer Looks Ahead

Date: 1937
Creator: United States. Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Description: This bulletin provides criteria by which farmers may determine how much they should plan to produce in a given year. There "are four major yardsticks: 1) How much should farmers produce, thinking only of the requirements of domestic consumers, plus; 2) What they can expect to ship to foreign countries in the next few years? 3) How much should they produce, thinking only of the requirements of soil conservation? 4) How much should farmers produce, thinking only of their incomes?" -- p. 3
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Ponds for Wildlife

Ponds for Wildlife

Date: 1941
Creator: Allan, Philip Farley, 1909- & Davis, Cecil N.
Description: "The first purpose of this bulletin is to show how farmers and ranchers may protect their ponds from sedimentation, soil erosion, and water loss through the use of vegetation suitable as food and shelter for wildlife; the second is to give some information on the management of wildlife in farm ponds. Unless otherwise stated, the information contained in this bulletin pertains to the water area, or pond proper, and the pond area, or the land immediately adjacent to the pond and ordinarily contained within a fence." -- p. ii
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Stubble-Mulch Farming for Soil Defense

Stubble-Mulch Farming for Soil Defense

Date: 1942
Creator: Carter, L. S. (Logan Sampson), 1906- & McDole, G. R.
Description: "Stubble-mulch farming, spectacular in its recent spread across the West, has sound scientific support. In one form or another, it has been demonstrating its advantages on experimental plots and in isolated field trials for many years. It is a practice that furthers the highest crop and livestock production compatible with the principle of soil security. It is a simple but effective method that will help us to avoid in the present emergency the disastrous aftermaths of the plow-up program of the 1920's. Materials for mulching are at hand -- products of the land itself -- waiting to be used for the retention of crop-making moisture and soil. Equipment can be bought on the market, or it can be rigged up by the farmer himself. Stubble-mulch farming can be fitted into a general conservation system -- applied to grain fields, row-crop land, and strip-croppered areas. It is flexible and economical, requires less mule power or machine power." -- p. ii
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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