Antebellum Jefferson, Texas: Everyday Life in an East Texas Town

Antebellum Jefferson, Texas: Everyday Life in an East Texas Town

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: March 15, 2012
Creator: Bagur, Jacques D.
Description: Founded in 1845 as a steamboat port at the entryway to western markets from the Red River, Jefferson was a thriving center of trade until the steamboat traffic dried up in the 1870s. During its heyday, the town monopolized the shipping of cotton from all points west for 150 miles. Jefferson was the unofficial capital of East Texas, but it was also typical of boom towns in general. For this topical examination of a frontier town, Bagur draws from many government documents, but also from newspaper ads and plats. These sources provide intimate details of the lives of the early citizens of Jefferson, Texas. Their story is of interest to both local and state historians as well as to the many readers interested in capturing the flavor of life in old-time East Texas. “Astoundingly complete and a model for local history research, with appeal far beyond readers who have specific interests in Jefferson.”—Fred Tarpley, author of Jefferson: Riverport to the Southwest
Contributing Partner: UNT Press
Oral History Interview with O. H. Harris, November 5, 1969

Oral History Interview with O. H. Harris, November 5, 1969

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: November 5, 1969
Creator: Marcello, Ronald E. & Harris, O. H.
Description: Interview with Republican Senator O. H. (Ike) Harris, an attorney from Dallas, Texas. In the interview, Senator Harris describes his personal experiences and views as a member of the Sixty-first legislature. He also discloses some biographical information as well as his decision to enter politics. Senator Harris discusses his personal political philosophies on issues including one versus two-year budgets, revenue legislation, welfare legislation, and state minimum wage laws. He also comments on fellow politicians Governor Preston Smith and Lieutenant Governor Ben Barnes.
Contributing Partner: UNT Oral History Program
[Campus - Scene - Three Women - Activities - 1942]

[Campus - Scene - Three Women - Activities - 1942]

Date: 1942
Creator: unknown
Description: Photograph of three women wearing dresses sitting down at a couch. One of the individuals on the right is holding a plate with an item upon it.
Contributing Partner: UNT Archives
The Healer of Los Olmos and Other Mexican Lore

The Healer of Los Olmos and Other Mexican Lore

Date: 1951
Creator: Texas Folklore Society
Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains Texas and Mexican folklore, including folktales, Mexican folk remedies, and stories about Don Pedrito Jaramillo, who was the Curandero of Los Olmos. The index begins on page 137.
Contributing Partner: UNT Press
[Guys that named the Eagle Scrappy]

[Guys that named the Eagle Scrappy]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: Photograph of three guys posing for a photo wearing long coats outside on a farm at night. The middle guy is holding a small flag with the name scrappy written on it. Behind them a bird cage is visible and further back a ranch fence made out of wire and wood can be seen.
Contributing Partner: UNT Archives
[Singing Group Chuck A Lucks Performing on Stage, December 7, 1957]

[Singing Group Chuck A Lucks Performing on Stage, December 7, 1957]

Date: December 7, 1957
Creator: unknown
Description: Photograph of the Chuck A Lucks singing group on stage during a performance on December 7th of 1957. One of the members of the group is playing a guitar as the band accompanies the singing group in the background.
Contributing Partner: UNT Archives
[Campus Registration, 1942]

[Campus Registration, 1942]

Date: 1942
Creator: unknown
Description: Photograph of students in an auditorium registering at a desk. There are numerous students standing in a line in the background as students in the foreground are in line at the desk.
Contributing Partner: UNT Archives
[Old Time Dancing]

[Old Time Dancing]

Date: 194u
Creator: Clark, Joe
Description: Narrative by Junebug Clark: Photograph is from the 1940s and is shot in Cumberland Gap, Tennessee. Students of "pappy" Hiram Frakes School learn old time dances.
Contributing Partner: UNT Archives
[Harvesting Cane]

[Harvesting Cane]

Date: 194u
Creator: Clark, Joe
Description: Narrative by Junebug Clark in the summer of 2014 Young Folks of the Burns and Evans families cut cane. Overall Background: These Molasses Making Stir-off photos were shot by Joe Clark HBSS in the early to mid-1940s. Either on the farm of Fred Whitaker about four miles southwest of Cumberland Gap, or in Cumberland Gap on the farm of Baptist preacher the Rev. Hugh Vancel. More information about these images can be found in scrapbooks in the Clark Family Collection at the University of North Texas Special Collections Library. Specifically in a Detroit news pictorial article published December 13, 1942 titles "stir-off party" where mountaineers make molasses and merriment. Also in life magazine published November 13, 1950 [page 156] titled “Stir-off Time in Tennessee, Fun Starts in Hills as Molasses Boils.’ Also in the library is the NBC Today Show story on Joe Clark HBSS by Bob Dotson. It features Joe Clark returning to Cumberland Gap Tennessee to photograph a molasses stir off taking place in the same location as some of these photographs and attended by some of the same people in the early 1980s. Let me briefly set the scene of the time and era that these photos ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Archives
Baptising in Olde Towne Creek

Baptising in Olde Towne Creek

Date: 1938
Creator: Clark, Joe
Description: Narrative by Junebug Clark: Photograph is from 1938 and is shot in Red Hill, Tennessee. One of the first photos made by Joe, Baptising in Olde Towne Creek, has endured to become a favorite and meaningful to many. It bears close scrutiny because of the differing expressions and attitudes of those attending. People have said that they have counted fifty-one people in this picture and I’ve listened to many a controversy about a TV antenna* appearing in this 1938 photo. The Rev. Hugh Vancel, in charge in this photo, performed countless baptisms, but the ceremony eventually moved indoors. Olde Towne Creek empties into Keg Branch, a creek that runs though our property, about three miles left of your view point. To your right, about a mile, is the Clark family cemetery where Joe was laid to rest in December of 1989. In 1981 the Smithsonian Institute displayed a print of this photo for use in an exhibit “Rights of Passage.” It was published in the autobiography of Dolly Parton and as the poster for the Wolf Trap Music Festival. Jb. *lightning rod
Contributing Partner: UNT Archives
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