U.S. Circuit and District Court Nominations During President Obama's First Five Years: Comparative Analysis With Recent Presidents

U.S. Circuit and District Court Nominations During President Obama's First Five Years: Comparative Analysis With Recent Presidents

Date: January 24, 2014
Creator: McMillion, Barry J.
Description: This report concerns nominations made by President Obama and other recent Presidents to the U.S. circuit courts of appeals and the U.S. district courts. It discusses the selection and confirmation process for U.S. circuit and district court judges.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
U.S. Circuit and District Court Nominations During the Obama Presidency: Midyear Analysis and Comparison with Recent Presidents

U.S. Circuit and District Court Nominations During the Obama Presidency: Midyear Analysis and Comparison with Recent Presidents

Date: June 30, 2014
Creator: McMillion, Barry J.
Description: This report addresses these issues by providing a statistical analysis of nominations to U.S. circuit and district court judgeships from January 20 of President Obama's first year in office to June 30 of his sixth year, and by comparing statistics during this period of the Obama presidency to statistics from comparable periods of time during the presidencies of his two most recent predecessors.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Supreme Court Appointment Process: Roles of the President, Judiciary Committee, and Senate

Supreme Court Appointment Process: Roles of the President, Judiciary Committee, and Senate

Date: September 3, 2010
Creator: Rutkus, Denis S.
Description: This report discusses the appointment of Supreme Court Justices, including the President's selection of a nominee and process to reach confirmation in the Senate. The appointment of a Supreme Court Justice is an event of major significance in American politics. Each appointment is of consequence because of the enormous judicial power the Supreme Court exercises as the highest appellate court in the federal judiciary. Appointments are usually infrequent, as a vacancy on the nine-member Court may occur only once or twice, or never at all, during a particular President's years in office. Under the Constitution, Justices on the Supreme Court receive lifetime appointments. Such job security in the government has been conferred solely on judges and, by constitutional design, helps insure the Court's independence from the President and Congress.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
President Obama's First-Term U.S. Circuit and District Court Nominations: An Analysis and Comparison with Presidents Since Reagan

President Obama's First-Term U.S. Circuit and District Court Nominations: An Analysis and Comparison with Presidents Since Reagan

Date: May 2, 2013
Creator: McMillion, Barry J.
Description: This report seeks to inform the current debate in three ways: first, by providing a statistical analysis of President Barack Obama's nominees, during his first term, to U.S. circuit court of appeals and U.S. district court judgeships, and of any actions taken on their nominations by the Senate Judiciary Committee and the full Senate; second, by using various statistical measures to compare the success of President Obama's judicial nominees, during his first term, in advancing through the Senate confirmation process with the success of the judicial nominees during the first terms of the four most recent preceding Presidents (Ronald Reagan, George H.W. Bush, Bill Clinton, and George W. Bush); and third, by identifying various factors which might help explain differences or variations found in judicial nomination statistics across the first terms of the five Presidents.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Appointment Process for U.S. Circuit and District Court Nominations: An Overview

The Appointment Process for U.S. Circuit and District Court Nominations: An Overview

Date: October 22, 2014
Creator: Rutkus, Denis Steven
Description: The report's exclusive focus is the process of appointment of U.S. circuit and district court judges through presidential nomination and Senate confirmation.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Nominations to Article III Lower Courts by President George W. Bush During the 110th Congress

Nominations to Article III Lower Courts by President George W. Bush During the 110th Congress

Date: May 30, 2008
Creator: Rutkus, Denis Steven; Scott, Kevin M. & Bearden, Maureen
Description: This report tracks nominations made by President George W. Bush to judgeships on the U.S. courts of appeals, the U.S. district courts, and the U.S. Court of International Trade. It lists and keeps count of all nominations made to these courts during the 110th Congress, including pertinent actions taken by the Senate Judiciary Committee and the full Senate. It also tracks the number of judicial vacancies on the courts (including vacancies classified by the federal judiciary as "judicial emergencies"), the number of nominations pending to fill the vacancies, and the names of the pending nominees. It presents the number of persons nominated by President Bush to each category of lower Article III court during his entire presidency (breaking down each total to show the number confirmed, pending, returned and not re-nominated, and withdrawn). Last, it provides a tabular comparison of President Bush's lower court nominee statistics with those of the four Presidents who immediately preceded him.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Role of Home State Senators in the Selection of Lower Federal Court Judges

Role of Home State Senators in the Selection of Lower Federal Court Judges

Date: February 11, 2013
Creator: Rutkus, Denis Steven
Description: This report examines the role that home state Senators, historically and in the contemporary era, have played in the selection of nominees to U.S. district court and circuit court of appeals judgeships. It also identifies issues that have arisen in recent years over the role of home state Senators in the selection process for federal judges.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Nomination and Confirmation of Lower Federal Court Judges in Presidential Election Years

Nomination and Confirmation of Lower Federal Court Judges in Presidential Election Years

Date: August 13, 2008
Creator: Rutkus, Denis Steven & Scott, Kevin M.
Description: This report seeks to shed light on whether Senate processing of lower court nominations, particularly to the courts of appeals, has tended over recent decades to slow down in presidential election years. The report begins by reviewing recent debate, and historical events dating back to 1980, concerning whether the Senate and its Judiciary Committee customarily observe a practice referred to as the "Thurmond rule." Next, the report provides narratives on each presidential election year from 1980 to 2004, reviewing Senate and committee actions taken on court of appeals and district court nominations in each of the years. The report then compares these years quantitatively, examining the number and percent of nominations processed and the last dates of committee and Senate action taken.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Supreme Court Appointment Process: Roles of the President, Judiciary Committee, and Senate

Supreme Court Appointment Process: Roles of the President, Judiciary Committee, and Senate

Date: February 19, 2010
Creator: Rutkus, Denis S.
Description: This report discusses the appointment of Supreme Court Justices, including the President's selection of a nominee and process to reach confirmation in the Senate.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Recess Appointments of Federal Judges

Recess Appointments of Federal Judges

Date: September 5, 2001
Creator: Fisher, Louis
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Supreme Court Nominations: Senate Floor Procedure and Practice, 1789-2011

Supreme Court Nominations: Senate Floor Procedure and Practice, 1789-2011

Date: March 11, 2011
Creator: Beth, Richard S. & Palmer, Betsy
Description: This report examines the ways in which the Senate has handled the 160 Supreme Court nominations the President has sent to the Senate. As the purpose of this report is to examine the forms taken by Senate proceedings on these 160 nominations, it treats each nomination as a separate case. It is not couched in terms of the smaller number of different individuals nominated or the ultimate outcome the confirmation process may have had for each individual.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Votes Other than Favorably on Judicial Nominations, 1939-2003

Votes Other than Favorably on Judicial Nominations, 1939-2003

Date: February 10, 2004
Creator: Sollenberger, Mitchel A
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Role of Home State Senators in the Selection of Lower Federal Court Judges

Role of Home State Senators in the Selection of Lower Federal Court Judges

Date: November 10, 2010
Creator: Rutkus, Denis Steven
Description: This report examines the role played by Senators in the selection of nominees to two kinds of lower federal court judgeships. Specifically, the judgeships in question, over which Senators have historically played a role in nominee selection, are those (1) in the U.S. district courts lying geographically within the Senators' states and (2) in the U.S. court of appeals circuits of which the Senators' states are a geographic part. This report also discusses several historical and ethical aspects related to Senators recommending judicial candidates.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Nominations to U.S. Circuit and District Courts by President Obama During the 111th and 112th Congresses

Nominations to U.S. Circuit and District Courts by President Obama During the 111th and 112th Congresses

Date: June 1, 2012
Creator: McMillion, Barry J.
Description: Recent Senate debates in the 112th Congress over judicial nominations have focused on issues such as the relative degree of success of President Barack Obama's nominees in gaining Senate confirmation (compared with other recent Presidents) as well as the effect of delayed judicial appointments on judicial vacancy levels. The following report addresses these issues, and others, by providing a statistical overview of President Obama's nominees to U.S. circuit court of appeals and U.S. district court judgeships, current through May 31, 2012.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
President Bush's Judicial Nominations During the 101st and 102nd Congresses

President Bush's Judicial Nominations During the 101st and 102nd Congresses

Date: March 29, 1993
Creator: Rutkus, Denis Steven
Description: There are ten categories of courts (including the local courts of the District of Columbia) to which the President nominates judges. The report provides background and statistics concerning President Bush's judicial nominations in each court category as well as actions taken on those nominations by the United States Senate. Each of the report's ten sections discusses the composition and jurisdiction of the court in question and notes the committee to which nominations to this court were referred when received by the Senate. Also, statistics on judicial nominations received by the Senate during the four years of the Bush Presidency are presented.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Final Senate Action on U.S. Circuit and District Court Nominations During a President's Eighth Year in Office

Final Senate Action on U.S. Circuit and District Court Nominations During a President's Eighth Year in Office

Date: January 27, 2016
Creator: McMillion, Barry J.
Description: This report, in light of continued Senate interest in the judicial confirmation process during a President's final year in office, provides statistics related to Senate action on U.S. circuit and district court nominations during the eighth year of the George W. Bush, Clinton, and Reagan presidencies. The eighth year of a presidency is significant, in part, because it is the final opportunity for a President to appoint individuals as U.S. circuit and district court judges. Such judges have what effectively has come to mean life tenure, holding office "during good Behaviour."
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Federal Recess Judges

Federal Recess Judges

Date: February 2, 2005
Creator: Fisher, Louis
Description: This report discusses the recess clause and takes a look at the history of recess appointments. Under Article II of the Constitution, the President is empowered "to fill up all Vacancies that may happen during the Recess of the Senate, by granting Commissions which shall expire at the End of their next Session." Presidents have used the recess appointment power on more than 300 occasions to place judges on the district, appellate, and U.S. Supreme Court level. This practice slowed after the 1950s, but recent recess appointments to federal appellate courts (the Fourth, Fifth, and Eleventh Circuits) have revived a number of constitutional issues.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Appointment Process for U.S. Circuit and District Court Nominations: An Overview

The Appointment Process for U.S. Circuit and District Court Nominations: An Overview

Date: June 17, 2016
Creator: Rutkus, Denis S.
Description: This report discusses the process of appointment of U.S. circuit and district court judges through presidential nomination and Senate confirmation. In recent decades, the process for appointing judges to the U.S. circuit courts of appeals and the U.S. district courts has been of continuing Senate interest. The responsibility for making these appointments is shared by the President and the Senate. Pursuant to the Constitution's Appointments Clause, the President nominates persons to fill federal judgeships, with the appointment of each nominee also requiring Senate confirmation. Although not mentioned in the Constitution, an important role is also played midway in the appointment process by the Senate Judiciary Committee.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department