The Prayer of Daniel: for flute (with alto flute), clarinet (with bass clarinet), violin, cello, doumbek, percussion, piano, bass-baritone voice, and men's chorus

The Prayer of Daniel: for flute (with alto flute), clarinet (with bass clarinet), violin, cello, doumbek, percussion, piano, bass-baritone voice, and men's chorus

Date: August 2003
Creator: Gutierrez, Jason
Description: The Prayer of Daniel is a chamber piece in the style of an oratorio for vocal bass-baritone soloist, flute doubling on alto flute, B flat clarinet doubling on bass clarinet, violin, cello, piano, percussion on vibraphone and marimba, doumbek (a middle eastern drum), and men's chorus (TTBB). The approximate duration is thirty minutes. The text comes from the Old Testament book of Daniel, Chapter 9 verses 4 through 19. In these passages the prophet Daniel rends from his heart a prayer of repentance, mercy and forgiveness on the behalf of a fallen nation. The harmonic language of the composition combines both classical contemporary and jazz sonorities. The rhythmic language is drawn from the meter of the text, and is used to underscore the emotion of the prayer. These elements combine to form a rich music experience that conveys the penitent heart of the prophet Daniel.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Tele: Using Vernacular Performance Practices in an Eight-Channel Environment

Tele: Using Vernacular Performance Practices in an Eight-Channel Environment

Date: August 2003
Creator: Welch, Chapman
Description: Examines the use of vernacular, country guitar styles in an electro-acoustic environment. Special attention is given to performance practices and explanation of techniques. Electro-acoustic techniques-including sound design and spatialization-are given with sonogram analyses and excerpts from the score. Compositional considerations are contrasted with those of Mario Davidovsky and Jean-Claude Risset with special emphasis on electro-acoustic approaches. Contextualization of the piece in reference to other contemporary, electric guitar music is shown with reference to George Crumb and Chiel Meijering.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Clockwork Plums

Clockwork Plums

Date: May 2004
Creator: Bradford, Joshua
Description: Based on a story by Joshua Forehand with additional lyrics by Joshua Bradford, Clockwork Plums is an original musical work that integrates techniques and ideas from composers and different cultures. The accompanying essay about the work includes a summary of the story, "Clockwork Plums," some historical background covering 30 years of pop music, an analysis focusing on the use of African and Reichian compositional devices, and discussion about controlled improvisation and use of the voice as compositional tools. The music consists of three sections scored for 5 voices (lead male vocalist and SATB), flute (doubling tenor saxophone), Bb clarinet (doubling baritone saxophone), violin, cello, piano, electronic keyboard, electric guitar, electric bass, drum set, and percussion.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
UNRAVEL: Acoustic and Electronic Resynthesis

UNRAVEL: Acoustic and Electronic Resynthesis

Date: August 2004
Creator: McCulloch, Peter
Description: UNRAVEL, a work for alto saxophone and interactive electronics. Examines works for saxophone and electro-acoustic music. Analyzes modes of interactivity using Robert Rowe's guidelines, with sonogram, score, and programming examples. Investigates hybrid serial-parallel signal-processing networks, and their potential for timbral transformations. Explores compositional working methods, particularly as related to electro-acoustic music.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Breaking Through: A Composition for Symphony Orchestra

Breaking Through: A Composition for Symphony Orchestra

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: August 2002
Creator: Dribus, John Alexander
Description: Breaking Through is a single-movement composition for symphony orchestra based on a fourteen-note melody. Every harmonic and melodic figure except the bass line is derived from this source melody. The structure of the work is based on a number of musical dichotomies that work on both local and large-scale levels. The local dichotomies contrast consonance with dissonance and ambiguity with clarity (in respect to texture and rhythm). The dichotomy of two-part form versus three-part form and the dichotomy of simplicity versus complexity operate on the large scale. The unity lended by the single source melody coupled with the contrasts furnished by the aforementioned dichotomies allow Breaking Through to be both coherent and interesting.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Ensemble: 2000-11-01 - CEMI: Impulse Response

Ensemble: 2000-11-01 - CEMI: Impulse Response

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: November 1, 2000
Creator: CEMI
Description: Concert presented at the UNT College of Music.
Contributing Partner: UNT Music Library
Ensemble: 2001-10-25 - NOVA

Ensemble: 2001-10-25 - NOVA

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: October 25, 2001
Creator: NOVA
Description: Ensemble performance at the UNT College of Music Concert Hall.
Contributing Partner: UNT Music Library
Rhapsody for Piano and Small Orchestra

Rhapsody for Piano and Small Orchestra

Date: December 2001
Creator: Ahn-Kim, Yong Hee
Description: Rhapsody for Piano and Small Orchestra is a one-movement composition in a concerto fashion for seventeen players, and is about nine minutes in duration. The overall form of this work is A B C D E D1 C1 B1 A1. This work contains various hidden compositional devices such as the golden section principle and a palindrome structure. These devices are applied not only to the structure of the work, but also to the pitch related and rhythm-related matters. Also, certain melodic and rhythmic cells are employed for each section in the developmental procedure of that section almost exclusively. Since this work is a concerto-like piece, there are two cadenza-like passages for the piano with an accompanying solo instrument, which plays the obbligato passage. The following essay addresses the form, pitch materials, harmony, rhythm and technical difficulties, orchestration, and variant elements between the corresponding sections used in this work.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries