Minding the Store: a Memoir

Minding the Store: a Memoir

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Date: August 15, 2001
Creator: Marcus, Stanley
Description: “‘There is never a good sale for Neiman Marcus unless it’s a good buy for the customer.’ That was one of the first declarations of business philosophy I heard my father, Herbert Marcus, make soon after I came to work at Neiman Marcus in 1926.” Thus began the 1974 edition of Minding the Store. Reprinted in hardcover in 1997 to celebrate the 90th anniversary of Neiman Marcus, it is now available for the first time in paperback and ebook. Mr. Marcus has spent most of his life not only in helping to create a retailing enterprise renowned throughout the world as the epitome of quality, but also in setting high standards for the level of taste of all who desire "the better things in life." In doing so he has played a key role in making Dallas itself a success. "Mr. Stanley," as he is affectionately called by all his Neiman Marcus friends and associates, has made The Store a legendary success. Although he retired from active involvement in Neiman Marcus in 1977, the influences of the philosophies of business he developed remain an important part of the training of Neiman Marcus personnel. Those basic principles—best exemplified by his belief ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Press
A Comparison of Mall Shopping Behavior Between Hispanic-Americans and Anglo-Americans

A Comparison of Mall Shopping Behavior Between Hispanic-Americans and Anglo-Americans

Date: August 2002
Creator: Sanchez, Marissa R.
Description: The population percentage, population growth, buying power, and geographic concentration of Hispanic-Americans in the United States is causing marketers and retailers to carefully examine this market segment. Through a better understanding of Hispanic-American consumers, marketers and retailers will be more capable of meeting their wants and needs. Tailoring marketing promotions and strategies can help a company more effectively reach the Hispanic-American market. This study compared Hispanic-Americans and Anglo-Americans in their general shopping characteristics, responses to excitement in the mall, consumption patterns, and repatronage intention. A total of seven hypotheses were developed, all of which were either supported or partially supported.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries