The Radiation Exposure Compensation Act (RECA): Compensation Related to Exposure to Radiation from Atomic Weapons Testing and Uranium Mining

The Radiation Exposure Compensation Act (RECA): Compensation Related to Exposure to Radiation from Atomic Weapons Testing and Uranium Mining

Date: March 24, 2015
Creator: Szymendera, Scott D.
Description: This report discusses the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act (RECA), which provides one-time benefit payments to persons who may have developed cancer or other specified diseases after being exposed to radiation from atomic weapons testing or uranium mining, milling, or transporting.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Radiological status report for the EBWR containment building. Volume 1: Summary and analysis

Radiological status report for the EBWR containment building. Volume 1: Summary and analysis

Date: February 1, 1996
Creator: Murdoch, B.T.
Description: At the conclusion of the EBWR D and D process, ANL Health Physics conducted a release survey to determine the radiological status of the facility. The primary goal of the survey was to verify that residual activities on building surfaces met DOE and ANL guidelines for downposting of a Radiologically Contaminated Area to a Radiologically Controlled Area. The resultant area was to bear no contamination designation, with no requirements for radiological personnel monitoring or protective clothing. ANL Health Physics designed a survey procedure, using a graded approach considering the building history, the D and D process, and the intended future use. The survey followed the general guidance of NRC NUREG/CR-5849, but simplified and reduced in scope to match the release goal. The building interior surfaces were divided into 15 principal survey units and one special survey unit. Each of the principal survey units had to meet the controlled release guidelines. The procedure consisted of dual full floor scans for beta/gamma activity, sampling measurements of total and removable alpha and beta/gamma activities, and background gamma exposure surveys. In the 15 principal survey units, surface activities were measured at a total of 444 locations. With the exception of certain excluded contaminated areas ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Radiological contamination penetration depth in Fernald transite panels

Radiological contamination penetration depth in Fernald transite panels

Date: December 6, 1995
Creator: Russ, W.R.; Valentine, J.D. & Chung, Wei
Description: To characterize the penetration depth of radiological contamination through the thickness of transite (an asbestos-cement building material) from the Department of Energy (DOE) Fernald site, both destructive and non-destructive analysis techniques were used. The destructive techniques were based on progressively removing layers of material and subsequent direct analysis of successive surfaces. These laminar analyses included quantitative measurements using a Geiger-Mueller (G-M) detector and qualitative measurements based on autoradiography and ultraviolet photography. G-M detector measurements during layer removal provided quantitative distributions consistent with diffusion theory and have served to validate a novel non-destructive technique. The ultraviolet analysis provided qualitative information with the advantage of instantaneous results that may be useful for screening samples. The autoradiographic analysis also provided qualitative results for comparison and image analysis. Both quantitative and qualitative results from this study indicated that the contamination did penetrate into the volume of the transite. However, this penetration depth was observed to be strongly dependent on the manner in which the transite was exposed to the contamination. Consequently, it is likely that significantly different penetration depths will be observed for different processes, buildings, and sites.
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Radiological conditions at Naen, Yugui, Lomiulal, Kabelle and Mellu Islands in the northern half of Rongelap Atoll

Radiological conditions at Naen, Yugui, Lomiulal, Kabelle and Mellu Islands in the northern half of Rongelap Atoll

Date: March 1, 1996
Creator: Robison, W.L. & Conrado, C.L.
Description: The data presented in the following tables is the total available for each northern island; they include both the data from the 1978 Northern Marshall Island Radiological Survey (NMIRS) and trips to Rongelap Atoll from 1986 through 1989. In one table we present the number of vegetation samples collected in the 1978 NMIRS and from 1986 through 1989. Again the majority of the {sup 137}Cs data is from the 1986-1989 trips. We have not made additional analyses of {sup 239+240}Pu, {sup 241}Am and {sup 90}Sr because the concentrations are very low and these radionuclides contribute less than 5% of an already very small dose. In another table we show the number of soil samples collected at each island in 1978 and the number collected since 1986. Most of the data are from 1986 through 1989. The major exception is {sup 90}Sr where all of the data are from the 1978 NMIRS. We have done some additional Pu analyses of surface soils (0-5 cm depth) in the northern islands. A significant amount of new data for {sup 137}Cs and {sup 241}Am have been generated from the samples collected from 1986 through 1989. The data are presented in the form of summary ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Environmental Report 1994, Volume No. 1

Environmental Report 1994, Volume No. 1

Date: September 1, 1995
Creator: Rath, K.S.; Harrach, R.J.; Gallegos, G.M. & Failor, R.A.
Description: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility operated by the University of California, serves as a national resource of scientific, technical, and engineering capability. The Laboratory`s mission focuses on nuclear weapons and national security, and over the years has been broadened to include areas such as strategic defense, energy, the environment, biomedicine, technology transfer, the economy, and education. The Laboratory carries out this multifaceted mission in compliance with local, state, and federal environmental regulatory requirements. It does so with the support of the Environmental Protection Department, which is responsible for environmental monitoring and analysis, hazardous waste management, environmental restoration, and ensuring compliance with environmental laws and regulations. LLNL comprises two sites: the Livermore site and Site 300. The Livermore site occupies an area of 3.28 square kilometers on the eastern edge of Livermore, California. Site 300, LLNL`s experimental testing site, is located 24 kilometers to the east in the Altamont Hills, and occupies an area of 30.3 square kilometers. Environmental monitoring activities are conducted at both sites as well as in surrounding areas. This summary provides an overview of LLNL`s environmental activities in 1994, including radiological and nonradiological sampling and surveillance monitoring, remediation, assessment of ...
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An aerial radiological survey of the Double Track Site and surrounding area. Central Nevada

An aerial radiological survey of the Double Track Site and surrounding area. Central Nevada

Date: July 1, 1995
Creator: Hendricks, T.J.
Description: An aerial radiological survey of the Double Track Site was conducted in December 1993. An interim report was issued. That report described survey procedures and presented terrestrial exposure rate and wide-area-averaged plutonium isopleth plots. This letter report presents additional plutonium plots and some ``rule-of-thumb`` calculations which should help the reader to properly interpret the data presented. Attached to this report are three isopleth plots produced from the Double Track data. No one processing method provides all the answers regarding a particular surveyed area. Where peak values are most important, isopleth {number_sign}1, created from the original unsmoothed data, is the presentation of choice. Isopleth {number_sign}2, from smoothed data, is superior for the detection of areas of widespread low-level contamination. Isopleth {number_sign}3, also smoothed data, satisfied a particular early mission goal but is not as useful for cleanup operations as the other two.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
An exposure assessment of radionuclide emissions associated with potential mixed-low level waste disposal facilities at fifteen DOE sites

An exposure assessment of radionuclide emissions associated with potential mixed-low level waste disposal facilities at fifteen DOE sites

Date: May 1, 1996
Creator: Lombardi, D.A. & Socolof, M.L.
Description: A screening method was developed to compare the doses received via the atmospheric pathway at 15 potential DOE MLLW (mixed low-level waste) sites. Permissible waste concentrations were back calculated using the radioactivity NESHAP (National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants) in 40 FR 61 (DOE Order 5820.2A performance objective). Site-specific soil and meteorological data were used to determine permissible waste concentrations (PORK). For a particular radionuclide, perks for each site do not vary by more than one order of magnitude. perks of {sup 14}C are about six orders of magnitude more restrictive than perks of {sup 3}H because of differences in liquid/vapor partitioning, decay, and exposure dose. When comparing results from the atmospheric pathway to the water and intruder pathways, {sup 14}C disposal concentrations were limited by the atmospheric pathway for most arid sites; for {sup 3}H, the atmospheric pathway was not limiting at any of the sites. Results of this performance evaluation process are to be used for planning for siting of disposal facilities.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Monthly health information report, August 1--31, 1948

Monthly health information report, August 1--31, 1948

Date: December 31, 1948
Creator: Bradley, J.E.
Description: This document presents details about health concerns resulting from the activities of the Mound Laboratory during the month of August 1948.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Radioactive Waste Management information for 1994 and record-to-date

Radioactive Waste Management information for 1994 and record-to-date

Date: July 1, 1995
Creator: French, D.L.; Lisee, D.J. & Taylor, K.A.
Description: This document, Radioactive Waste Management Information for 1994 and Record-To-Date, contains computerized radioactive waste data records from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Data are compiled from information supplied by the US Department of Energy (DOE) contractors. Data listed are on airborne and liquid radioactive effluents and solid radioactive waste that is stored, disposed, and sent to the INEL for reduction. Data are summarized for the years 1952 through 1993. Data are detailed for the calendar year 1994.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Predicting Induced Radioactivity at High Energy Accelerators

Predicting Induced Radioactivity at High Energy Accelerators

Date: August 27, 1999
Creator: Fasso, Alberto
Description: Radioactive nuclides are produced at high-energy electron accelerators by different kinds of particle interactions with accelerator components and shielding structures. Radioactivity can also be induced in air, cooling fluids, soil and groundwater. The physical reactions involved include spallations due to the hadronic component of electromagnetic showers, photonuclear reactions by intermediate energy photons and low-energy neutron capture. Although the amount of induced radioactivity is less important than that of proton accelerators by about two orders of magnitude, reliable methods to predict induced radioactivity distributions are essential in order to assess the environmental impact of a facility and to plan its decommissioning. Conventional techniques used so far are reviewed, and a new integrated approach is presented, based on an extension of methods used at proton accelerators and on the unique capability of the FLUKA Monte Carlo code to handle the whole joint electromagnetic and hadronic cascade, scoring residual nuclei produced by all relevant particles. The radiation aspects related to the operation of superconducting RF cavities are also addressed.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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