U.S. Disposal of Chemical Weapons in the Ocean: Background and Issues for Congress

U.S. Disposal of Chemical Weapons in the Ocean: Background and Issues for Congress

Date: May 24, 2006
Creator: Bearden, David M
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
U.S. Disposal of Chemical Weapons in the Ocean: Background and Issues for Congress

U.S. Disposal of Chemical Weapons in the Ocean: Background and Issues for Congress

Date: May 24, 2006
Creator: Bearden, David M
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Monthly health information report, August 1--31, 1948

Monthly health information report, August 1--31, 1948

Date: December 31, 1948
Creator: Bradley, J.E.
Description: This document presents details about health concerns resulting from the activities of the Mound Laboratory during the month of August 1948.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Fluor Daniel Hanford contract standards/requirements identification document

Fluor Daniel Hanford contract standards/requirements identification document

Date: April 24, 1997
Creator: Bennett, G.L.
Description: This document, the Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) for the Fluor Daniel Hanford Contract, represents the necessary and sufficient requirements to provide an adequate level of protection of the worker, public health and safety, and the environment.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Options for improving hazardous waste cleanups using risk-based criteria

Options for improving hazardous waste cleanups using risk-based criteria

Date: June 1, 1995
Creator: Elcock, D.
Description: This paper explores how risk- and technology-based criteria are currently used in the RCRA and CERCLA cleanup programs. It identifies ways in which risk could be further incorporated into RCRA and CERCLA cleanup requirements and the implications of risk-based approaches. The more universal use of risk assessment as embodied in the risk communication and risk improvement bills before Congress is not addressed. Incorporating risk into the laws and regulations governing hazardous waste cleanup, will allow the use of the best scientific information available to further the goal of environmental protection in the United States while containing costs. and may help set an example for other countries that may be developing cleanup programs, thereby contributing to enhanced global environmental management.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Yucca Mountain Project Prototype Testing Program; 1989 Status report

The Yucca Mountain Project Prototype Testing Program; 1989 Status report

Date: October 1, 1989
Creator: unknown
Description: The Yucca Mountain Project is conducting a Prototype Testing Program to ensure that the Exploratory Shaft Facility (ESF) tests can be completed in the time available and to develop instruments, equipment, and procedures so the ESF tests can collect reliable and representative site characterization data. This report summarizes the prototype tests and their status and location and emphasizes prototype ESF and surface tests, which are required in the early stages of the ESF site characterization tests. 14 figs.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Toward integrated design of waste management technologies

Toward integrated design of waste management technologies

Date: November 1, 1993
Creator: Carnes, S.A. & Wolfe, A.K.
Description: What technical, economic and institutional factors make radioactive and/or hazardous waste management technologies publicly acceptable? The goal of this paper is to initiate an identification of factors likely to render radioactive and hazardous waste management technologies publicly acceptable and to provide guidance on how technological R&D might be revised to enhance the acceptability of alternative waste management technologies. Technology development must attend to the full range of technology characteristics (technical, engineering, physical, economic, health, environmental, and socio-institutional) relevant to diverse stakeholders. ORNL`s efforts in recent years illustrate some attempts to accomplish these objectives or, at least, to build bridges toward the integrated design of waste management technologies.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Preliminary assessments the shortcut to remediation (category III-surplus facility assessments)

Preliminary assessments the shortcut to remediation (category III-surplus facility assessments)

Date: August 1, 1995
Creator: Byars, L.L.
Description: This report presents the details of the preliminary assessments for the shortcut of decontamination of surplus nuclear facilities. Topics discussed include: environment, health and safety concerns; economic considerations; reduction of transition time; preliminary characterization reports; preliminary project plan; health and safety plan; quality assurance plan; surveillance and maintenance plan; and waste management plan.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The smoke-fireplume model : tool for eventual application to prescribed burns and wildland fires.

The smoke-fireplume model : tool for eventual application to prescribed burns and wildland fires.

Date: August 17, 1999
Creator: Brown, D. F.; Dunn, W. E.; Lazaro, M. A. & Policastro, A. J.
Description: Land managers are increasingly implementing strategies that employ the use of fire in prescribed burns to sustain ecosystems and plan to sustain the rate of increase in its use over the next five years. In planning and executing expanded use of fire in wildland treatment it is important to estimate the human health and safety consequences, property damage, and the extent of visibility degradation from the resulting conflagration-pyrolysis gases, soot and smoke generated during flaming, smoldering and/or glowing fires. Traditional approaches have often employed the analysis of weather observations and forecasts to determine whether a prescribed burn will affect populations, property, or protected Class I areas. However, the complexity of the problem lends itself to advanced PC-based models that are simple to use for both calculating the emissions from the burning of wildland fuels and the downwind dispersion of smoke and other products of pyrolysis, distillation, and/or fuels combustion. These models will need to address the effects of residual smoldering combustion, including plume dynamics and optical effects. In this paper, we discuss a suite of tools that can be applied for analyzing dispersion. These tools include the dispersion models FIREPLUME and SMOKE, together with the meteorological preprocessor SEBMET.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Environmental management of assembled chemical weapons assessment program.

Environmental management of assembled chemical weapons assessment program.

Date: May 7, 1999
Creator: Frey, G.; Mohrman, G. & Templin, B. R.
Description: Environmental planning and management was an integral part of the ACWA Program planning process. To ensure that environmental protection issues could be addressed expeditiously and not delay the demonstrations, the PMACWA scaled the technology demonstrations such that simplified regulatory processes and existing research and development facilities could be used. The use of enclosed facilities for the demonstrations prevents any uncontrolled discharges to the environment and made it possible to conduct environmental assessments relatively quickly. The PMACWA also arranged for public briefings to ease any community concerns over the operations with chemical weapons. These steps precluded regulatory and community resistance to the ACWA activities. The cooperation of the regulators and stakeholders has been a key element in enabling the ACWA Program to move with the speed that it has to date. Technology demonstrations are currently underway and are scheduled to be completed in late May 1999. The data collected during these demonstrations will be used to prepare and submit a summary report to Congress by August 1999. The challenge continues for the ACWA management to guide the demonstrations to completion and to plan for possible pilot testing. As the scale of the ACWA facilities increase in size, the ease of reduced ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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