Applications of Modern Hydrodynamics to Aeronautics. Part 1: Fundamental Concepts and the Most Important Theorems. Part 2: Applications

Applications of Modern Hydrodynamics to Aeronautics. Part 1: Fundamental Concepts and the Most Important Theorems. Part 2: Applications

Date: December 1, 1979
Creator: Prandtl, L.
Description: A discussion of the principles of hydrodynamics of nonviscous fluids in the case of motion of solid bodies in a fluid is presented. Formulae are derived to demonstrate the transition from the fluid surface to a corresponding 'control surface'. The external forces are compounded of the fluid pressures on the control surface and the forces which are exercised on the fluid by any solid bodies which may be inside of the control surfaces. Illustrations of these formulae as applied to the acquisition of transformations from a known simple flow to new types of flow for other boundaries are given. Theoretical and experimental investigations of models of airship bodies are presented.
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Recent progress in the theory of air flow as applied to aeronautics

Recent progress in the theory of air flow as applied to aeronautics

Date: January 1, 1922
Creator: Prandtl, L
Description: In summing up it may be said that the hydrodynamic theories are best confirmed by experimental results for bodies with small resistance or drag and can accordingly be used in place of experimental tests.
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Application of the "Magnus effect" to the wind propulsion of ships

Application of the "Magnus effect" to the wind propulsion of ships

Date: June 1, 1926
Creator: Prandtl, L
Description: None
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Tasks of air flow research

Tasks of air flow research

Date: June 1, 1926
Creator: Prandtl, L
Description: The researches at the Gottingen Institute are discussed especially in regards to the physical properties of fluids. The three main properties of fluids examined concern density, viscosity, and compressibility.
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Motion of fluids with very little viscosity

Motion of fluids with very little viscosity

Date: March 1, 1928
Creator: Prandtl, L
Description: I have set myself the task to investigate systematically the laws of motion of a fluid whose viscosity is assumed to be very small. The viscosity is supposed to be so small that it can be disregarded wherever there are no great velocity differences nor accumulative effects.
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Applications of Modern Hydrodynamics to Aeronautics

Applications of Modern Hydrodynamics to Aeronautics

Date: January 1, 1923
Creator: Prandtl, L
Description: The report gives, rather briefly, in part one an introduction to hydrodynamics which is designed to give those who have not yet been actively concerned with this science such a grasp of the theoretical underlying principles that they can follow the subsequent developments. In part two there follows a separate discussion of the different questions to be considered, in which the theory of aerofoils claims the greatest portion of the space. The last part is devoted to the application of the aerofoil theory to screw propellers. A table giving the most important quantities is at the end of the report. A short reference list of the literature on the subject and also a table of contents are added.
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First experiences with the rotating laboratory

First experiences with the rotating laboratory

Date: July 1, 1926
Creator: Prandtl, L
Description: This report describes experiences with a rotating cylinder to explore the effects of motion and flow upon human sensory organs. One observation was that the variation of the resultant line of gravity (from gravity and centrifugal force) was not felt so strongly as might be expected. The impressions produced by the physical effects on the members of the body, especially the ones caused by the deflecting force (Coriolis force), are exactly what the laws of physics would lead us to expect, although somewhat surprising when observed in one's own body.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Note on the calculation of boundary layers

Note on the calculation of boundary layers

Date: November 1, 1940
Creator: Prandtl, L
Description: The properties of the solutions of the hydrodynamic equations of viscous fluid by "boundary-layer omission" are discussed. A method is indicated for the numerical determination of the solution for a known initial profile u(x(sub o),y) and pressure distribution p(x) within the region.
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Recent work on airfoil theory

Recent work on airfoil theory

Date: December 1, 1940
Creator: Prandtl, L
Description: The basic ideas of a new method for treating the problem of the airfoil are presented, and a review is given of the problems thus far computed for incompressible and supersonic flows. Test results are reported for the airfoil of circular plan form and the results are shown to agree well with the theory. As a supplement, a theory based on the older methods is presented for the rectangular of small aspect ratio.
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Report on Investigation of Developed Turbulence

Report on Investigation of Developed Turbulence

Date: January 18, 1949
Creator: Prandtl, L.
Description: The recent experiments by Jakob and Erk, on the resistance of flowing water in smooth pipes, which are in good agreement with earlier measurements by Stenton and Pannell, have caused me to change my opinion that the empirical Blasius law (resistance proportional to the 7/4 power of the mean velocity) was applicable up to arbitrarily high Reynolds numbers. According to the new tests the exponent approaches 2 with increasing Reynolds number, where it remains an open question whether or not a specific finite limiting value of the resistance factor lambda is obtained at R = infinity. With the collapse of Blasius' law the requirements which produced the relation that the velocity in the proximity of the wall varied in proportion to the 7th root of the wall distance must also become void. However, it is found that the fundamental assumption that led to this relationship can be generalized so as to furnish a velocity distribution for any empirical resistance law. These fundamental assumptions can be so expressed that for the law of velocity distribution in proximity of the wall as well as for that of friction at the wall, a form can be found in which the pipe diameter no ...
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