RECOVERY AND SEQUESTRATION OF CO2 FROM STATIONARY COMBUSTION SYSTEMS BY PHOTOSYNTHESIS OF MICROALGAE

RECOVERY AND SEQUESTRATION OF CO2 FROM STATIONARY COMBUSTION SYSTEMS BY PHOTOSYNTHESIS OF MICROALGAE

Date: May 1, 2001
Creator: Nakamura, Dr. T. & Senior, Dr. C.L.
Description: Most of the anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide result from the combustion of fossil fuels for energy production. Photosynthesis has long been recognized as a means, at least in theory, to sequester anthropogenic carbon dioxide. Aquatic microalgae have been identified as fast growing species whose carbon fixing rates are higher than those of land-based plants by one order of magnitude. Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI), Aquasearch, and the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute at the University of Hawaii are jointly developing technologies for recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from stationary combustion systems by photosynthesis of microalgae. The research is aimed primarily at demonstrating the ability of selected species of microalgae to effectively fix carbon from typical power plant exhaust gases. This report covers the reporting period 1 January to 31 March 2001 in which Aquasearch tested 24 different species of microalgae for growth at three different temperatures. Eleven species were analyzed for the presence of high-value pigments. Most of the algae analyzed were good sources of industrially valuable pigments. Analysis of the methods for introducing and dissolving CO{sub 2} in the commercial bioreactor was begun this quarter.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
BEST: Bilingual environmental science training, Grades 3--4

BEST: Bilingual environmental science training, Grades 3--4

Date: March 1, 1996
Creator: unknown
Description: This booklet is one of a series of bilingual guides to environmental-science learning activities for students to do at home. Lesson objectives, materials required, procedure, vocabulary, and subjects integrated into the lesson are described in English for each lesson. A bilingual glossary, alphabetized by English entries, with Spanish equivalents and definitions in both English and Spanish, follows the lesson descriptions, and is itself followed by a bibliography of English-language references with annotations in English. This booklet includes descriptions of ten lessons that cover the following topics: the identification of primary and secondary colors in the environment; recognizing the basic food tastes; the variety of colors that can be made by crushing plant parts; the variety of animal life present in common soil; animal tracks; evidence of plant and animal life in the local environment; recycling, reducing, and composting as alternative means of garbage disposal; waste associated with packaging; paper- recycling principles; and how organic waste can be composted into usable soil. 2 figs.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Replacement of thermally produced calcined clay with thermally structured pigments and methods for the same. Final technical report

Replacement of thermally produced calcined clay with thermally structured pigments and methods for the same. Final technical report

Date: January 23, 1997
Creator: Whalen-Shaw, M.
Description: The subject is coating of paperboard. Structured pigments designed to eliminate calcined clay were prepared and tested.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Replacemernt of thermally produced calcined clay with chemically structured pigments and methods for the same, quarterly report, January 1, 1995-April 1, 1995

Replacemernt of thermally produced calcined clay with chemically structured pigments and methods for the same, quarterly report, January 1, 1995-April 1, 1995

Date: April 25, 1995
Creator: Whalen-Shaw, M.
Description: The business objective is to manufacture an economically viable chemically structured clay to replace thermally structured calcined clay. The technology will provide substantial benefit in paper coating. The structured pigment containing 90% clay and 10% TiO2 vs the loose blend of these materials as a filler for paper was evaluated. A plan to improve the permanence of the structured pigment using dual functional dispersed pigments is in place. The cationic dispersant for TiO2 will also be a binder. Spray drying will be use to fix the structure of the internally bound structured pigment.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
[Replacement of thermally produced calcined clay with chemically structured pigments and methods for the same]. Quarterly report, April 1, 1995--August 1, 1995

[Replacement of thermally produced calcined clay with chemically structured pigments and methods for the same]. Quarterly report, April 1, 1995--August 1, 1995

Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: Whalen-Shaw, M.
Description: The objective is to license the present technology for replacing thermally structured clay (calcined clay) with chemically structured clay. Composite layered pigments using Titanium dioxide and {number_sign}1 standard clay have already been shown to have activity in replacing calcined clay. In this past quarter the effect of clay particle size and distribution as raw materials for making the layered pigment have been investigated.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Replacement of thermally produced calcined clay with chemically structured pigments and methods for the same, quarterly report, May 1, 1996-August 1, 1996

Replacement of thermally produced calcined clay with chemically structured pigments and methods for the same, quarterly report, May 1, 1996-August 1, 1996

Date: December 31, 1996
Creator: Whalen-Shaw, M.
Description: The focus was on the preparation and testing of Miragloss clay and Brazilian clay as copigments.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Replacement of thermally produced calcined clay with chemically structured pigments and methods for the same. Final technical report

Replacement of thermally produced calcined clay with chemically structured pigments and methods for the same. Final technical report

Date: January 23, 1997
Creator: Whalen-Shaw, M.
Description: This investigation focuses on layered pigments for the paper industry, more specifically layered (two non-identical particles) pigments for paper coating, with resulting improved opacity (brightness).
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Replacement of thermally produced calcined clay with chemically structured pigments and methods for the same, Final technical report, Quarterly report, February 3, 1996-May 1, 1996

Replacement of thermally produced calcined clay with chemically structured pigments and methods for the same, Final technical report, Quarterly report, February 3, 1996-May 1, 1996

Date: December 31, 1996
Creator: Whalen-Shaw, M.
Description: The testing of control formulas was repeated due to instability of the TiO2 dispersion being used. Calcined clay controls were compared to the performance of layered pigments of the instant invention in coatings on brown natural kraft paperboard from Mead Corporation.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Structure, Function and Reconstitution of Antenna Complexes from Green Photosynthetic Bacteria

Structure, Function and Reconstitution of Antenna Complexes from Green Photosynthetic Bacteria

Date: August 10, 2005
Creator: Blankenship, Robert E.
Description: This project is concerned with the structure and function of the chlorosome antennas found in green photosynthetic bacteria. Chlorosomes are ellipsoidal structures attached to the cytoplasmic side of the inner cell membrane. These antenna complexes provide a very large absorption cross section for light capture. Evidence is overwhelming that the chlorosome represents a very different type of antenna from that found in any other photosynthetic system yet studied. It is now clear that chlorosomes do not contain traditional pigment-proteins, in which the pigments bind to specific sites on proteins. Instead, the chlorosome pigments are organized in vivo into pigment oligomers in which direct pigment-pigment interactions are of dominant importance. Our group has used a multidisciplinary approach to investigate this unique system, as well as the complexes that they directly interact with. Our work has included using model systems, numerous types of both steady-state and ultrafast spectroscopy, molecular biology, protein chemistry and X-ray crystallography. Details of our recent results using these approaches are given below and in the references. Numbers cited in the sections refer to DOE-sponsored publications that are listed below. Only publications dated 2001-2004 or later are included in this report. In addition to the primary literature reports, a ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Structure, Function and Reconstitution of Antenna Complexes of Green Photosynthetic Bacteria

Structure, Function and Reconstitution of Antenna Complexes of Green Photosynthetic Bacteria

Date: June 10, 2005
Creator: Blankenship, Robert E.
Description: Most chlorophyll-type pigments in a photosynthetic organism function as an antenna, absorbing light and transferring excitations to a photochemical reaction center where energy storage takes place by a series of chemical reactions. The green photosynthetic bacteria are characterized by large antenna complexes known as chlorosomes, in which pigment-pigment interactions are of dominant importance. The overall objective of this project is to determine the mechanisms of excitation transfer and regulation of this unique antenna system, including how it is integrated into the rest of the photosynthetic energy transduction apparatus. Techniques that are being used in this research include biochemical analysis, spectroscopy, microscopy, X-ray structural studies, and reconstitution from purified components. Our recent results indicate that the chlorosome baseplate structure, which is the membrane attachment site for the chlorosome to the membrane, is a unique pigment-protein that contains large amounts of carotenoids and small amounts of bacteriochlorophyll a. Reconstitution of directed energy transfer in chlorosomes will be carried out using purified baseplates and oligomeric pigments. The integral membrane B808-866 antenna complex from Chloroflexus aurantiacus and the Fenna-Matthews-Olson protein-reaction center complex from green sulfur bacteria will be characterized by spectroscopic and structural techniques.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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