Photosensitive Point Defects in Optical Glasses: Science and Applications

Photosensitive Point Defects in Optical Glasses: Science and Applications

Date: July 28, 1999
Creator: Potter, B.G. Jr. & Simmons-Potter, K.
Description: The understanding and manipulation of the point defect structure in oxide glasses have been critical to the enhanced performance and reliability of optical-fiber-based, photosensitive photonic devices that currently found widespread application in telecommunications and remote sensing technologies. We provide a brief review of past research investigating photosensitive mechanisms in germanosilicate glasses, the primary material system used in telecommunications fibers. This discussion motivates an overview of ongoing work within our laboratories to migrate photosensitive glass technologies to a planar format for integrated photonic applications. Using reactive-atmosphere, RF-magnetron sputtering, we have demonstrated control of glass defect structure during synthesis, thereby controlling both the material photosensitivity (i. e. dispersion and magnitude of the refractive index change) and its environmental stability.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Semiconductor Nanowires: What's Next?

Semiconductor Nanowires: What's Next?

Date: April 28, 2010
Creator: Yang, Peidong; Yan, Ruoxue & Fardy, Melissa
Description: In this perspective, we take a critical look at the research progress within the nanowire community for the past decade. We discuss issues on the discovery of fundamentally new phenomena versus performance benchmarking for many of the nanowire applications. We also notice that both the bottom-up and top-down approaches have played important roles in advancing our fundamental understanding of this new class of nanostructures. Finally we attempt to look into the future and offer our personal opinions on what the future trends will be in nanowire research.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Nevada Test Site-Directed Research, Development, and Demonstration

Nevada Test Site-Directed Research, Development, and Demonstration

Date: September 1, 2006
Creator: Will Lewis, Compiler
Description: The Nevada Test Site-Directed Research, Development, and Demonstration (SDRD) program completed a very successful year of research and development activities in FY 2005. Fifty new projects were selected for funding this year, and five FY 2004 projects were brought to conclusion. The total funds expended by the SDRD program were $5.4 million, for an average per project cost of just under $100,000. Two external audits of SDRD accounting practices were conducted in FY 2005. Both audits found the program's accounting practices consistent with the requirements of DOE Order 413.2A, and one included the observation that the NTS contractor ''did an exceptional job in planning and executing year-start activities.'' Highlights for the year included: the filing of 18 invention disclosures for intellectual property generated by FY 2005 projects; programmatic adoption of 17 FY 2004 SDRD-developed technologies; participation in the tri-lab Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) and SDRD program review that was broadly attended by NTS, NNSA, LDRD, and U.S. Department of Homeland Security representatives; peer reviews of all FY 2005 projects; and the successful completion of 55 R&D projects, as presented in this report.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Nevada Test Site-Directed Research and Development, FY 2007 Report

Nevada Test Site-Directed Research and Development, FY 2007 Report

Date: February 20, 2008
Creator: Wil Lewis, editor
Description: The Nevada Test Site-Directed Research and Development (SDRD) program completed a very successful year of research and development activities in FY 2007. Twenty-nine new projects were selected for funding this year, and eight projects started in FY 2006 were brought to conclusion. The total funds expended by the SDRD program were $5.67 million, for an average per-project cost of $153 thousand. An external audit conducted in September 2007 verified that appropriate accounting practices were applied to the SDRD program. Highlights for the year included: programmatic adoption of 8 SDRD-developed technologies; the filing of 9 invention disclosures for innovation evolving from SDRD projects; participation in the tri-Lab Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) and SDRD Symposium that was broadly attended by Nevada Test Site (NTS), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), LDRD, U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) representatives; peer reviews of all FY 2007 projects; and the successful completion of 37 R&D projects, as presented in this report. In response to a company-wide call, authors throughout the NTS complex submitted 182 proposals for FY 2007 SDRD projects. The SDRD program has seen a dramatic increase in the yearly total of submitted proposals--from 69 in FY ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Electrostatic Mechanism of Emission Enhancement in Hybrid Metal-semiconductor Light-emitting Heterostructures

Electrostatic Mechanism of Emission Enhancement in Hybrid Metal-semiconductor Light-emitting Heterostructures

Date: May 2012
Creator: Llopis, Antonio
Description: III-V nitrides have been put to use in a variety of applications including laser diodes for modern DVD devices and for solid-state white lighting. Plasmonics has come to the foreground over the past decade as a means for increasing the internal quantum efficiency (IQE) of devices through resonant interaction with surface plasmons which exist at metal/dielectric interfaces. Increases in emission intensity of an order of magnitude have been previously reported using silver thin-films on InGaN/GaN MQWs. the dependence on resonant interaction between the plasmons and the light emitter limits the applications of plasmonics for light emission. This dissertation presents a new non-resonant mechanism based on electrostatic interaction of carriers with induced image charges in a nearby metallic nanoparticle. Enhancement similar in strength to that of plasmonics is observed, without the restrictions imposed upon resonant interactions. in this work we demonstrate several key features of this new interaction, including intensity-dependent saturation, increase in the radiative recombination lifetime, and strongly inhomogeneous light emission. We also present a model for the interaction based on the aforementioned image charge interactions. Also discussed are results of work done in the course of this research resulting in the development of a novel technique for strain measurement ...
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