An exploration of parental sensitivity and child cognitive and behavioral development.

An exploration of parental sensitivity and child cognitive and behavioral development.

Date: August 2005
Creator: Ingle, Sarah J.
Description: The current study attempted to show the relationship of paternal sensitivity and maternal sensitivity and their possible influences on child cognitive and behavioral development. This study used data collected as part of the National Institute for Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) Study of Early Child Care, which is a longitudinal, multi-site study. Correlation and regression analyses were computed to examine relationships between the variables at child age 6 and 36 months. Results indicated paternal sensitivity was a significant positive predictor of child cognitive abilities and a negative predictor of both fathers' reports of children's externalizing and internalizing behaviors. Maternal sensitivity was a significant negative predictor of mothers' reports of children's externalizing behaviors. Interpretations of these results and directions for future research are discussed.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Influence of Parental Conflict on Late Adolescent Perceptions of Parental Support

The Influence of Parental Conflict on Late Adolescent Perceptions of Parental Support

Date: August 1998
Creator: Flint, Pamela
Description: The question addressed in this study is whether either parent's conflict style affected the supportive quality of the parents' relationship with the son or daughter. It was important to explore variables that affect support because supportive relationships with parents have been related to adolescent adjustment. Past studies have suggested parental conflict has a negative impact on the parent-adolescent relationship. Research in the area of mediators of perceived support in the parent-adolescent relationships is limited. This study focused on perceived support in the specific relationship of the parent and adolescent. Qualitative measures of conflict were used since they have been more strongly related to changes in parent-adolescent relationships than quantitative measures. In this study the supportive quality of the parent-adolescent relationship was operationalized as a measure of parental support, depth of the parent-adolescent relationship, and conflict in the parent-adolescent relationship (Quality of Relationship Inventory).
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Filial Therapy with Immigrant Korean Parents in the United States

Filial Therapy with Immigrant Korean Parents in the United States

Date: August 2002
Creator: Lee, Mi-Kyong
Description: This study was designed to determine the effectiveness of filial therapy training in: (a) increasing immigrant Korean parents' empathic behavior with their children; (b) increasing immigrant Korean parents' acceptance level toward their children; and (c) reducing immigrant Korean parents' stress related to parenting.The experimental group, consisting of 17 immigrant Korean parents in the United States, received 10 weekly 2-hour filial therapy training sessions and participated in weekly 30-minute play sessions with one of their children. The control group, consisting of 15 immigrant Korean parents in the United States, received no treatment during the ten weeks. All the parents were videotaped playing with their child before and after the training as a means of measuring change in empathic behavior. The two written self-report instruments completed for pretesting and posttesting purposes were the Porter Parental Acceptance Scale and the Parenting Stress Index. Analyses of covariance revealed that the immigrant Korean parents in the experimental group had significant changes in 10 of 12 hypotheses, including (a) a significant increase in their level of empathic interactions with their children; (b) a significant increase in their attitude of acceptance toward their children; and (c) a significant reduction in their level of stress related to parenting. ...
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Adolescents' Perception of Parental Behavior toward Them and its Relationship with Sex, Delinquency, and Security

Adolescents' Perception of Parental Behavior toward Them and its Relationship with Sex, Delinquency, and Security

Date: May 1972
Creator: Mojallali, Shah, 1938-
Description: This study investigated adolescents' perception of parental behavior toward them and its relationship with sex, delinquency, and security. The subjects chosen for the study were sixty boys and sixty girls from eleventh grade English classes, and sixty boys and sixty girls from two institutions for juvenile delinquents. All subjects were white, they ranged in age from fifteen through eighteen years, and they had two living parents.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
A Comparison of Personality Traits Between College Students Reared Within a Selected Polar Region by Non-Native Parents and College Students Reared Within Non-Polar Regions by Native Parents

A Comparison of Personality Traits Between College Students Reared Within a Selected Polar Region by Non-Native Parents and College Students Reared Within Non-Polar Regions by Native Parents

Date: December 1971
Creator: Pope, John Winfred
Description: The problem with which this study was concerned was that of determining of climatic circumstances significantly affect personality development.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Relation Between the Sociability of Parents and the Social Success of their Children in School

The Relation Between the Sociability of Parents and the Social Success of their Children in School

Date: 1940
Creator: Patrick, Flora LaRue
Description: The purpose of this study is to determine what relation, if any, exists between the social interests and participation of parents and the social success of their children in elementary school. An additional purpose is to determine the relationship between occupational status of parents and social success of children.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Creative Ability and Perceived Parent-Child Relations

Creative Ability and Perceived Parent-Child Relations

Date: August 1969
Creator: Elsom, Billy Fred, 1943-
Description: The purpose of this study was to determine if selected perceived parent-child relationships were differentially associated with an individual's capacity to demonstrate the intellectual processes of creativity.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Parent Psychopathology, Marital Adjustment, and Child Psychological Dysfunction: The Mediating Role of Attachment and Sibling Relationship

Parent Psychopathology, Marital Adjustment, and Child Psychological Dysfunction: The Mediating Role of Attachment and Sibling Relationship

Date: August 2010
Creator: Hindman, Jason M.
Description: This study is part of a larger research project examining family attachment processes. The current study tests a family process model that postulates the mediating role of parent-child attachment and sibling relationship quality in the associations of parent psychopathology or marital adjustment to children's psychological dysfunction. A community sample of 86 families with at least one school-aged (8-12 years) child was recruited from area schools and organizations. Families came to the UNT Family Attachment Lab, where they participated in research tasks, including interviews, self-report instruments, and videotaped interaction tasks. Specific questionnaires used in this study included the Sibling Relationship Questionnaire, the Security Scale, the Behavior Assessment System for Children, the Symptom Assessment-45 Questionnaire, and the Dyadic Adjustment Scale. Using a single indicator for each variable, path analyses tested three paternal models, three maternal models, and three systemic models using different informants' (i.e., father, mother, child) reports of child functioning as the outcome variable. Results of this study highlight the positive relationship between parent marital adjustment and parent-child attachment security, as well as the inverse relationship between maternal psychopathology and mother-child attachment security. In addition, the inverse relationship between parent-child attachment security and child psychological dysfunction was significant across nearly all ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
School based child parent relationship therapy (CPRT) with low income Black American parents: Effects on children's behaviors and parent-child relationship stress, a pilot study.

School based child parent relationship therapy (CPRT) with low income Black American parents: Effects on children's behaviors and parent-child relationship stress, a pilot study.

Date: May 2008
Creator: Sheely, Angela
Description: This study examined the effectiveness of training low income Black American parents in child parent relationship therapy (CPRT). In response to the cultural values and challenges faced by low income Black American parents, the CPRT manual was adapted slightly for use with parents for this study. In this quasi-experimental design, 14 parents were assigned to the experimental group and 13 parents were assigned to the no treatment control group. Six hypotheses were analyzed. Different analyses were conducted based on the hypotheses. A two-factor repeated measures analysis of variance and analysis of covariance were conducted to determine if the CPRT treatment and the no treatment control group performed differently across time according to pretest and posttest results of the Child Behavior Checklist - Parent Version (CBCL) and the Parenting Stress Index (PSI). Additionally, partial η2 was calculated to determine practical significance. Five hypotheses were retained at the .025 level of significance. Findings indicated that parents who participated in the CPRT training reported a statistically significant decrease in parent-child relationship stress. Specifically, parents assigned to the experimental group demonstrated a statistically significant decrease in Child Domain (p < .001), Parent Domain (p < .001), and Total Stress (p < .001) of the ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Is video modeling enough to teach parent-child interactions? Toward a systematic evaluation of the key components of video modeling.

Is video modeling enough to teach parent-child interactions? Toward a systematic evaluation of the key components of video modeling.

Date: May 2008
Creator: Whaley-Carr, Anna Marie
Description: Parent-child interactions help set the foundation for a child's development. It is therefore important to investigate the relative efficiency and efficacy of procedures used to train them. One procedure that researchers continue to explore is video modeling. The current study evaluated the effect of a video model that displayed favorable parent-child interactions and a modified model with embedded instructions to determine if the introduction of either of these models would alter parent-child interactions. Both models were presented alone without supplemental guidance. Three families were involved in the study. The results showed no systematic change across families or conditions as a result of video viewing and are discussed within context of the needs of the parent, adequate stimulus control, community to support behavior change, measurement sensitivity, and influence of methodology. This study provided a great baseline for future studies to explore the necessary components to create an effective video model.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
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