Special Order Speeches and Other Forms of Non-Legislative Debate in the House

Special Order Speeches and Other Forms of Non-Legislative Debate in the House

Date: November 24, 2010
Creator: Palmer, Betsy
Description: This report briefly discusses non-legislative debate in the House of Representatives, specifically special order speeches, one-minute speeches, and morning hour debate. The purpose of these practices is to permit Members to address the House for specified durations and at specified times of their own choosing, outside the consideration of legislative business.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Introducing a House Bill or Resolution

Introducing a House Bill or Resolution

Date: November 24, 2010
Creator: Palmer, Betsy
Description: This report briefly discusses the procedure for introducing a bill or resolution in the House of Representatives.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Sponsorship and Cosponsorship of House Bills

Sponsorship and Cosponsorship of House Bills

Date: November 24, 2010
Creator: Palmer, Betsy
Description: This report briefly discusses the processes of sponsoring, cosponsoring, and gaining cosponsors for bills in the House of Representatives.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Senate Committee Rules in the 112th Congress: A Comparison of Key Provisions

Senate Committee Rules in the 112th Congress: A Comparison of Key Provisions

Date: February 17, 2012
Creator: Palmer, Betsy
Description: This report reviews the requirements contained in Senate rules pertaining to committees; it then explores how each Senate committee addresses 11 specific issues: meeting day, hearing and meeting notice requirements, scheduling of witnesses, hearing quorum, business quorum, amendment filing requirements, proxy voting, polling, nominations, investigations, and subpoenas. In addition, the report looks at the unique provisions some committees have included in their rules in the miscellaneous category.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Secret Sessions of the House and Senate: Authority, Confidentiality, and Frequency

Secret Sessions of the House and Senate: Authority, Confidentiality, and Frequency

Date: November 30, 2011
Creator: Palmer, Betsy
Description: Secret, or closed, sessions of the House and Senate exclude the press and the public. They may be held for matters deemed to require confidentiality and secrecy-such as national security, sensitive communications received from the President, and Senate deliberations during impeachment trials. Although Members usually seek advance agreement for going into secret session, any Member of Congress may request a secret session without notice. When the House or Senate goes into secret session, its chamber and galleries are cleared of everyone except Members and officers and employees specified in the rules or designated by the presiding officer as essential to the session. After the chamber is cleared, its doors are closed.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
9/11 Commission Recommendations: The Senate Confirmation Process for Presidential Nominees

9/11 Commission Recommendations: The Senate Confirmation Process for Presidential Nominees

Date: March 23, 2005
Creator: Palmer, Betsy
Description: On July 22, 2004, the National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States, known as the 9/11 Commission, issued its final report, detailing the events up to and including the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks upon the United States. The 9/11 Commission recommended that the Senate adopt rules requiring hearings and votes to confirm or reject national security nominees within 30 days of their submission at the start of each new presidential administration. Implementing the commission's proposal would involve imposing new restrictions on both the power of committee chairs to control the agenda of their committees and the rights of Senators to delay or block nominations through holds and extended debate. This report discusses in detail this proposal, how it could be implemented, and the potential effects of its implementation.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Evolution of the Senate's Role in the Nomination and Confirmation Process: A Brief History

Evolution of the Senate's Role in the Nomination and Confirmation Process: A Brief History

Date: March 29, 2005
Creator: Palmer, Betsy
Description: Over time, the Senate has developed a series of procedures to deal with the concerns of its Members on nominations. First is the custom of senatorial courtesy, whereby Senators from the same party as the President might influence a nomination or kill it by objecting to it. This tradition has not always been absolute, but it has allowed Senators to play a fairly large role, particularly in the selection of nominees within a Senator’s home state, such as for district court judgeships.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Evolution of the Senate's Role in the Nomination and Confirmation Process: A Brief History

Evolution of the Senate's Role in the Nomination and Confirmation Process: A Brief History

Date: June 5, 2003
Creator: Palmer, Betsy
Description: Over time, the Senate has developed a series of procedures to deal with the concerns of its Members on nominations. First is the custom of senatorial courtesy, whereby Senators from the same party as the President might influence a nomination or kill it by objecting to it. This tradition has not always been absolute, but it has allowed Senators to play a fairly large role, particularly in the selection of nominees within a Senator’s home state, such as for district court judgeships.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Changing Senate Rules: The "Constitutional" or "Nuclear" Option

Changing Senate Rules: The "Constitutional" or "Nuclear" Option

Date: May 26, 2005
Creator: Palmer, Betsy
Description: This report indicates possible attempts to curtail the use of filibusters in the Senate, perhaps in the 109th Congress. Some have suggested that proponents of this idea may invoke something called the “nuclear” or “constitutional” option in Senate floor procedure to try to end a filibuster without the need for 60 votes or to amend the cloture rule (Rule XXII) itself. This report presents several possible scenarios that would require one or more of the Senate’s precedents be overturned or interpreted otherwise than in the past.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Commonly Used Motions and Requests in the House of Representatives

Commonly Used Motions and Requests in the House of Representatives

Date: November 30, 2004
Creator: Palmer, Betsy
Description: This report identifies the most commonly used motions and requests available to Members during proceedings in the House of Representatives. The report divides the motions and requests into seven broad categories, based on when the motion or request is in order and who can make the motion or request. Daily Business is the category that includes items that are routine to the conduct of business in the House each day, such as the motion to adjourn. Decorum and Privilege covers issues of the rights and privileges of Members and the House and how Members conduct themselves on the floor.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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