Introducing a House Bill or Resolution

Introducing a House Bill or Resolution

Date: November 24, 2010
Creator: Palmer, Betsy
Description: This report briefly discusses the procedure for introducing a bill or resolution in the House of Representatives.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Special Order Speeches and Other Forms of Non-Legislative Debate in the House

Special Order Speeches and Other Forms of Non-Legislative Debate in the House

Date: November 24, 2010
Creator: Palmer, Betsy
Description: This report briefly discusses non-legislative debate in the House of Representatives, specifically special order speeches, one-minute speeches, and morning hour debate. The purpose of these practices is to permit Members to address the House for specified durations and at specified times of their own choosing, outside the consideration of legislative business.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Sponsorship and Cosponsorship of House Bills

Sponsorship and Cosponsorship of House Bills

Date: November 24, 2010
Creator: Palmer, Betsy
Description: This report briefly discusses the processes of sponsoring, cosponsoring, and gaining cosponsors for bills in the House of Representatives.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Secret Sessions of the House and Senate: Authority, Confidentiality, and Frequency

Secret Sessions of the House and Senate: Authority, Confidentiality, and Frequency

Date: November 30, 2011
Creator: Palmer, Betsy
Description: Secret, or closed, sessions of the House and Senate exclude the press and the public. They may be held for matters deemed to require confidentiality and secrecy-such as national security, sensitive communications received from the President, and Senate deliberations during impeachment trials. Although Members usually seek advance agreement for going into secret session, any Member of Congress may request a secret session without notice. When the House or Senate goes into secret session, its chamber and galleries are cleared of everyone except Members and officers and employees specified in the rules or designated by the presiding officer as essential to the session. After the chamber is cleared, its doors are closed.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Senate Committee Rules in the 112th Congress: A Comparison of Key Provisions

Senate Committee Rules in the 112th Congress: A Comparison of Key Provisions

Date: February 17, 2012
Creator: Palmer, Betsy
Description: This report reviews the requirements contained in Senate rules pertaining to committees; it then explores how each Senate committee addresses 11 specific issues: meeting day, hearing and meeting notice requirements, scheduling of witnesses, hearing quorum, business quorum, amendment filing requirements, proxy voting, polling, nominations, investigations, and subpoenas. In addition, the report looks at the unique provisions some committees have included in their rules in the miscellaneous category.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Evolution of the Senate's Role in the Nomination and Confirmation Process: A Brief History

Evolution of the Senate's Role in the Nomination and Confirmation Process: A Brief History

Date: July 2, 2008
Creator: Palmer, Betsy
Description: This report discusses the process of Advice and Consent in the Senate. Article II, Section 2 of the Constitution states that the President "shall nominate, and by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, shall appoint Ambassadors, other Public Ministers and Counsels, Judges of the Supreme Court, and all Other Officers of the United States, whose appointments are not herein otherwise provided for, and which shall be established by law…."
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Sponsorship and Cosponsorship of House Bills

Sponsorship and Cosponsorship of House Bills

Date: July 18, 2006
Creator: Palmer, Betsy
Description: This report briefly discusses the processes of sponsoring, cosponsoring, and gaining cosponsors for bills in the House of Representatives.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Hearings in the U.S. Senate: A Guide for Preparation and Procedure

Hearings in the U.S. Senate: A Guide for Preparation and Procedure

Date: December 3, 2007
Creator: Palmer, Betsy
Description: This report discusses hearings in the U.S. Senate and is divided into four main sections. This introduction addresses the role of hearings in the committee process, types of hearings, and broad organizational issues.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Senate Committee Hearings: Preparation

Senate Committee Hearings: Preparation

Date: February 22, 2007
Creator: Palmer, Betsy
Description: Committee hearings allow Senators an opportunity to gather information on, and draw attention to, legislation and issues within a committee’s purview, conduct oversight of programs or agencies, and investigate allegations of wrongdoing. This report contains a checklist that identifies many of the tasks that need to be performed by a full committee and, in most cases, subcommittees in advance of a hearing. Some of the tasks are required by Senate or committee rules; others are common committee practice. Some tasks are usually the responsibility of the committee’s majority staff, some are shared by majority and minority staff, and some are performed by a Senator’s personal office staff.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Senate Committee Hearings: Preparation

Senate Committee Hearings: Preparation

Date: September 17, 2009
Creator: Palmer, Betsy
Description: Committee hearings allow Senators an opportunity to gather information on, and draw attention to, legislation and issues within a committee’s purview, conduct oversight of programs or agencies, and investigate allegations of wrongdoing. This report contains a checklist that identifies many of the tasks that need to be performed by a full committee and, in most cases, subcommittees in advance of a hearing. Some of the tasks are required by Senate or committee rules; others are common committee practice. Some tasks are usually the responsibility of the committee’s majority staff, some are shared by majority and minority staff, and some are performed by a Senator’s personal office staff.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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