Visitor's Impressions of New Orleans Before 1860

Visitor's Impressions of New Orleans Before 1860

Date: May 1937
Creator: Boyles, Jane Russell
Description: This thesis depicts the growth and history of New Orlens before 1860 as it was seen by vistors from the outside.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Between Logos and Eros: New Orleans' Confrontation with Modernity

Between Logos and Eros: New Orleans' Confrontation with Modernity

Date: May 2008
Creator: Moore, Erin Christine
Description: This thesis examines the environmental and social consequences of maintaining the artificial divide between thinking and feeling, mind and matter, logos and eros. New Orleans, a city where the natural environment and human sensuality are both dominant forces, is used as a case study to explore the implications of our attempts to impose rational controls on nature - both physical and human nature. An analysis of New Orleans leading up to and immediately following Hurricane Katrina (2005) reveals that the root of the trouble in the city is not primarily environmental, technological, political, or sociological, but philosophical: there is something amiss in the relationship between human rationality and the corporeal world. I argue that policy decisions which do not include the contributions of experts from the humanities and qualitative social sciences - persons with expertise on human emotions, intentions, priorities and desires - will continue to be severely compromised.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Mama D's 2 Blocks: A Documentary Film

Mama D's 2 Blocks: A Documentary Film

Date: May 2007
Creator: Ferris, Mika
Description: Mama D's 2 Blocks tells the story of a neighborhood home in New Orleans that was transformed into a distribution center and used to assist residents impacted by Hurricane Katrina's devastation in 2005. Mama D stayed at her home throughout the storm and remained there until the floodwaters had subsided. After the water had drained, socially minded youth from all over the country were drawn to Mama D's home and stayed there while supporting local renewal efforts. The film documents their joining together, without electricity or running water, and assisting in the rebuilding process undertaken by Mama D and other neighborhood residents. This film captures a community in action, how it survived, and the first steps taken towards the rebuilding of New Orleans.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Creole Angel: The Self-Identity of the Free People of Color of Antebellum New Orleans

Creole Angel: The Self-Identity of the Free People of Color of Antebellum New Orleans

Date: August 2006
Creator: Hobratsch, Ben Melvin
Description: This thesis is about the self-identity of antebellum New Orleans's free people of color. The emphasis of this work is that French culture, mixed Gallic and African ancestry, and freedom from slavery served as the three keys to the identity of this class of people. Taken together, these three factors separated the free people of color from the other major groups residing in New Orleans - Anglo-Americans, white Creoles and black slaves. The introduction provides an overview of the topic and states the need for this study. Chapter 1 provides a look at New Orleans from the perspective of the free people of color. Chapter 2 investigates the slaveownership of these people. Chapter 3 examines the published literature of the free people of color. The conclusion summarizes the significance found in the preceding three chapters and puts their findings into a broader interpretive framework.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Continuity of Caste: Free People of Color in the Vieux Carré of New Orleans, 1804-1820

Continuity of Caste: Free People of Color in the Vieux Carré of New Orleans, 1804-1820

Date: May 2012
Creator: Foreman, Nicholas
Description: Because of its trademark racial diversity, historians have often presented New Orleans as a place transformed by incorporation into the American South following 1804. Assertions that a comparatively relaxed, racially ambiguous Spanish slaveholding regime was converted into a two-caste system of dedicated racial segregation by the advent of American assumption have been posited by scholars like Frank Tannenbaum, Gwendolyn Midlo Hall, and a host of others. Citing dependence on patronage, concubinage, and the decline in slave manumissions during the antebellum period, such studies have employed descriptions of the city’s prominent free people of color to suggest that the daily lives of non-whites in New Orleans experienced uniform restriction following 1804, and that the Crescent City’s transformation from Atlantic society with slaves to rigid slave society forced free people of color out of the heart of the city, known as the Vieux Carré, and into “black neighborhoods” on the margins of town. Despite the popularity of such generalized themes in the historiography, however, the extant sources housed in New Orleans’s valuable archival repositories can be used to support a vastly divergent narrative. By focusing on individual free people of color, or libres, rather than the non-white community as a whole, this ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Social Vulnerability and Faith in Disasters: an Investigation Into the Role of Religion in New Orleans After Hurricane Katrina

Social Vulnerability and Faith in Disasters: an Investigation Into the Role of Religion in New Orleans After Hurricane Katrina

Date: May 2012
Creator: Herring, Alison M.
Description: Disasters are an ever increasing phenomena in our society, resulting in many people being adversely affected. the social vulnerability paradigm explores the social, economic and political factors which contribute to certain populations being disproportionately affected by disasters. However, the paradigm has not yet begun to investigate the cultural or religious ideologies which may affect a population's behavior in disaster. This study is an exploratory investigation into whether religious ideologies may impact a person's decision to prepare, or not, in the event of a disaster. Specifically, it seeks to investigate whether a person who holds a belief that natural disasters are under God's control will prepare for the hazard? the study undertaken five years after Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans show that religious ideology is closely linked with one's capacity to prepare for the hazard which is closely tied in with social structure. It may appear that a person's 'fatalistic' attitude is tied to economic inability to prepare for a hazard. This does not mean that they will not prepare but that preparation may include prayer as their initial attempt to mitigate.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
[Letter from Mary Moore to Charles B. and Linnet Moore, November 8, 1897]

[Letter from Mary Moore to Charles B. and Linnet Moore, November 8, 1897]

Date: November 8, 1897
Creator: Moore, Mary
Description: Letter from Mary Moore to Charles and Linnet Moore in which she updates them on the health of family and friends; the weather; and the people she has seen or missed seeing. She has plans to visit a grave yard. She writes about the crops and what price farmers are getting for their produce.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
[Letter from Alice McGee to to Aunt Mary and Uncle Charles Moore]

[Letter from Alice McGee to to Aunt Mary and Uncle Charles Moore]

Date: May 1890
Creator: McGee, Alice
Description: Letter from Alice McGee to her aunt and uncle, Mary and Charles Moore. She wrote about her trip home to Tennessee through New Orleans. She encountered a train wreck and saw flooding in Morgan City. Her letter that said that she was returning home had not arrived, so her arrival surprised her family.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections