N-Acylethanolamine Metabolism Interacts with Abscisic Acid Signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana Seedlings

N-Acylethanolamine Metabolism Interacts with Abscisic Acid Signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana Seedlings

Date: August 2007
Creator: Teaster, Neal D.; Motes, Christy M.; Tang, Yuhong; Wiant, William C.; Cotter, Matthew Q.; Wang, Yuh-Shuh et al.
Description: Article discussing N-acylethanolamine metabolism interacting with abscisic acid signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Arts and Sciences
Lauroylethanolamide and linoleoylethanolamide improve functional outcome in a rodent model for stroke

Lauroylethanolamide and linoleoylethanolamide improve functional outcome in a rodent model for stroke

Date: April 4, 2011
Creator: Garg, Puja; Duncan, Scott R.; Kaja, Simon; Zabaneh, Alexander; Chapman, Kent D. & Koulen, Peter
Description: Article on lauroylethanolamide and linoeloylethanolamide improving the functional outcome in a rodent model for stroke.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Arts and Sciences
N-Acylethanolamine Signaling in Tobacco is Mediated by a Membrane-Associated, High-Affinity Binding Protein

N-Acylethanolamine Signaling in Tobacco is Mediated by a Membrane-Associated, High-Affinity Binding Protein

Date: April 2003
Creator: Tripathy, Swati; Kleppinger-Sparace, Kathryn; Dixon, R. A. & Chapman, Kent D.
Description: Article on N-acylethanolamine signaling in tobacco and how it is mediated by a membrane-associated, high-affinity binding protein.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Arts and Sciences
A regulatory role for N-acylethanolamine metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana seeds and seedlings.

A regulatory role for N-acylethanolamine metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana seeds and seedlings.

Date: May 2009
Creator: Teaster, Neal D.
Description: N-Acylethanolamines (NAEs) are bioactive acylamides that are present in a wide range of organisms. Because NAE levels in seeds decline during imbibition similar to ABA, a physiological role was predicted for these metabolites in Arabidopsis thaliana seed germination and seedling development. There is also a corresponding increase of AtFAAH (fatty acid amide hydrolase), transcript levels and activity, which metabolizes NAE to ethanolamine and free fatty acids. Based on whole genome microarray studies it was determined that a number of up-regulated genes that were responsive to NAE were also ABA responsive. NAE induced gene expression in these ABA responsive genes without elevating endogenous levels of ABA. It was also determined that many of these NAE/ABA responsive genes were associated with an ABA induced secondary growth arrest, including ABI3. ABI3 is a transcription factor that regulates the transition from embryo to seedling growth, the analysis of transcript levels in NAE treated seedlings revealed a dose dependent, inverse relationship between ABI3 transcript levels and growth, high ABI3 transcript levels were associated with growth inhibition. Similar to ABA, NAE negatively regulated seedling growth within a narrow window of early seedling establishment. When seedlings are exposed to NAE or ABA within the window of sensitivity, ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
N-Acylethanolamine (NAE) profiles change during Arabidopsis thaliana seed germination and seedling growth.

N-Acylethanolamine (NAE) profiles change during Arabidopsis thaliana seed germination and seedling growth.

Date: August 2006
Creator: Wiant, William C.
Description: An understanding of the potential roles as lipid mediators of a family of bioactive metabolites called N-acylethanolamines (NAEs) depends on their accurate identification and quantification. The levels of 18C unsaturated NAEs (e.g. NAE18:2, NAE 18:3, etc.) in wild-type seeds (about 2000 ng/g fw) generally decreased by about 80% during germination and post-germinative growth. In addition, results suggest NAE-degradative fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) expression does not play a major role in normal NAE metabolism as previously thought. Seedlings germinated and grown in the presence of abscisic acid (ABA), an endogenous plant hormone, exhibited growth arrest and secondary dormancy, similar to the treatment of seedlings with exogenous N­lauroylethanolamine (NAE12:0). ABA-mediated growth arrest was associated with higher levels of unsaturated NAEs. Overall, these results are consistent with the concept that NAE metabolism is activated during seed germination and suggest that the reduction in unsaturated NAE levels is under strict temporal control and may be a requirement for normal seed germination and post-germinative growth.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
N-Acylethanolamine metabolism during seed germination: Molecular identification of a functional N-acylethanolamine amidohydrolase.

N-Acylethanolamine metabolism during seed germination: Molecular identification of a functional N-acylethanolamine amidohydrolase.

Date: August 2004
Creator: Shrestha, Rhidaya
Description: N-Acylethanolamines (NAEs) are endogenous lipid metabolites that occur in a variety of dry seeds, and their levels decline rapidly during the first few hours of imbibition (Chapman et al., 1999, Plant Physiol., 120:1157-1164). Biochemical studies supported the existence of an NAE amidohydrolase activity in seeds and seedlings, and efforts were directed toward identification of DNA sequences encoding this enzyme. Mammalian tissues metabolize NAEs via an amidase enzyme designated fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). Based on the characteristic amidase signature sequence in mammalian FAAH, a candidate Arabidopsis cDNA was identified and isolated by reverse transcriptase-PCR. The Arabidopsis cDNA was expressed in E. coli and the recombinant protein indeed hydrolyzed a range of NAEs to free fatty acids and ethanolamine. Kinetic parameters for the recombinant protein were consistent with those properties of the rat FAAH, supporting identification of this Arabidopsis cDNA as a FAAH homologue. Two T-DNA insertional mutant lines with disruptions in the Arabidopsis NAE amidohydrolase gene (At5g64440) were identified. The homozygous mutant seedlings were more sensitive than the wild type to exogenously applied NAE 12:0. Transgenic seedlings overexpressing the NAE amidohydrolase enzyme showed noticeably greater tolerance to NAE 12:0 than wild type seedlings. These results together provide evidence in vitro ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries