Fidget, Sway, and Swerve: Three Works Inspired By Movement From the Intricate Maneuvers Series

Fidget, Sway, and Swerve: Three Works Inspired By Movement From the Intricate Maneuvers Series

Date: December 2012
Creator: Summar, Sarah Page
Description: Intricate Maneuvers is a series of musical works that were composed using movement as a model for compositional processes and forms. This essay presents in-depth analyses of three works from the series; Fidget, Sway: The Mildest Form of Falling, and Swerve for Chamber Ensemble. The analysis of each work highlights correlations between the musical characteristics of that work and the temporal, spatial, contextual, and psychological implications of the motion after which it was modeled. The third chapter also demonstrates the ways in which the creation of Sway was influenced by materials and processes taken from Ruth Crawford's String Quartet 1931. In order to investigate the question of how life experiences can function as models for compositional processes, the essay examines precedents for the compositional modeling of extra-musical ideas and images in the works of Bed?ich Smetana, Elliott Carter and Roger Reynolds. It also discusses approaches to modeling movement in music created for dance. Throughout the Intricate Maneuvers series, movement is modeled not merely to create an association between a musical work and a particular movement pattern, but rather to infuse the compositions with the dynamism that defines a particular kinetic experience.
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The Characteristics of Teacher-Directed Modeling Evidenced in the Practices of Three Experienced High School Choral Directors.

The Characteristics of Teacher-Directed Modeling Evidenced in the Practices of Three Experienced High School Choral Directors.

Date: December 2001
Creator: Grimland, Fredna H.
Description: The purpose of this study was to analyze the characteristics of teacher directed modeling evidenced in the practices of three experienced high school choral directors. Research questions were: 1. What modeling activities were exhibited in each teacher's rehearsals? 2. When viewing a 45-minute composite tape of each teacher's instructional activities representative of all rehearsals, what instructional behaviors did each choral director recognize and identify as modeling? 3. What instructional episodes on the composite tape not identified by the teachers contained elements of modeling? 4. What other episodes from the remainder of each choral director's rehearsal practice contributed to an understanding of modeling? Videotapes of three high school choral directors were recorded over the course of one semester. Excerpts from rehearsals were combined to form a 45-minute composite tape of each choral director. A text transcription was made of the composite tape. Participant directors viewed their tape and identified instructional episodes that they recognized as examples of modeling. Identifications were analyzed, and descriptive categories of modeling behaviors were established. Modeling was found to be a teacher generated or delegated act of demonstration. Demonstrations were musical or non-musical and belonging to either of three distinct categories: audible, visible, or process modeling. Subdivisions ...
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The use of streambed temperatures to estimate transmission losses on an experimental channel.

The use of streambed temperatures to estimate transmission losses on an experimental channel.

Date: October 18, 2001
Creator: Naranjo, Ramon C.; Young, Michael H.; Niswonger, Richard; Miller, Julianne J. & French, Richard H.
Description: Quantifying channel transmission losses in arid environments is important for a variety of reasons, from engineering design of flood control structures to evaluating recharge. To quantify the losses in an alluvial channel, an experiment was performed on a 2-km reach of an alluvial fan located on the Nevada Test Site. The channel was subjected to three separate flow events. Transmission losses were estimated using standard discharge monitoring and subsurface temperature modeling approach. Four stations were equipped to continuously monitor stage, temperature, and water content. Streambed temperatures measured at 0, 30, 50 and 100 cm depths were used to calibrate VS2DH, a two-dimensional, variably saturated flow model. Average losses based on the difference in flow between each station indicate that 21 percent, 27 percent, and 53 percent of the flow was reduced downgradient of the source. Results from the temperature monitoring identified locations with large thermal gradients, suggesting a conduction-dominated heat transfer on streambed sediments where caliche-cemented surfaces were present. Transmission losses at the lowermost segment corresponded to the smallest thermal gradient, suggesting an advection-dominated heat transfer. Losses predicted by VS2DH are within an order of magnitude of the estimated losses based on discharge measurements. The differences in losses are a ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Modeling of Glass Making Processes for Improved Efficiency

Modeling of Glass Making Processes for Improved Efficiency

Date: March 31, 2003
Creator: III, Thomas P. Seward
Description: The overall goal of this project was to develop a high-temperature melt properties database with sufficient reliability to allow mathematical modeling of glass melting and forming processes for improved product quality, improved efficiency and lessened environmental impact. It was initiated by the United States glass industry through the NSF Industry/University Center for Glass Research (CGR) at Alfred University [1]. Because of their important commercial value, six different types/families of glass were studied: container, float, fiberglass (E- and wool-types), low-expansion borosilicate, and color TV panel glasses. CGR member companies supplied production-quality glass from all six families upon which we measured, as a function of temperature in the molten state, density, surface tension, viscosity, electrical resistivity, infrared transmittance (to determine high temperature radiative conductivity), non-Newtonian flow behavior, and oxygen partial pres sure. With CGR cost sharing, we also studied gas solubility and diffusivity in each of these glasses. Because knowledge of the compositional dependencies of melt viscosity and electrical resistivity are extremely important for glass melting furnace design and operation, these properties were studied more fully. Composition variations were statistically designed for all six types/families of glass. About 140 different glasses were then melted on a laboratory scale and their viscosity and ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Studying Wildlife at Local and Landscape Scales: Bachman's Sparrow at the Savannah River Site

Studying Wildlife at Local and Landscape Scales: Bachman's Sparrow at the Savannah River Site

Date: October 1, 2000
Creator: Dunning, J.B.; Danielson, B.J.; Watts, B.D.; Liu, J. & Krementz, D.R.
Description: Mutual interests between land managers at SRS and scientists resulted in a landscape ecology study of Bachman's sparrow. The species is declining throughout it's range. The distribution of suitable habitats across the landscape may provide an explanation. The species occupies early successional and late successional savanna habitat. Modeling was closely linked to field observations to demonstrate how the species demographics change with the distribution and dynamics of habitats.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Determining the mechanical constitutive properties of metals as a function of strain rate and temperature: A combined experimental and modeling approach

Determining the mechanical constitutive properties of metals as a function of strain rate and temperature: A combined experimental and modeling approach

Date: January 5, 2004
Creator: Robertson, I. M.; Beaudoin, A. & Lambros, J.
Description: OAK-135 Development and validation of constitutive models for polycrystalline materials subjected to high strain rate loading over a range of temperatures are needed to predict the response of engineering materials to in-service type conditions (foreign object damage, high-strain rate forging, high-speed sheet forming, deformation behavior during forming, response to extreme conditions, etc.). To account accurately for the complex effects that can occur during extreme and variable loading conditions, requires significant and detailed computational and modeling efforts. These efforts must be closely coupled with precise and targeted experimental measurements that not only verify the predictions of the models, but also provide input about the fundamental processes responsible for the macroscopic response. Achieving this coupling between modeling and experimentation is the guiding principle of this program. Specifically, this program seeks to bridge the length scale between discrete dislocation interactions with grain boundaries and continuum models for polycrystalline plasticity. Achieving this goal requires incorporating these complex dislocation-interface interactions into the well-defined behavior of single crystals. Despite the widespread study of metal plasticity, this aspect is not well understood for simple loading conditions, let alone extreme ones. Our experimental approach includes determining the high-strain rate response as a function of strain and temperature with ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Prediction of Corrosion of Alloys in Mixed-Solvent Environments

Prediction of Corrosion of Alloys in Mixed-Solvent Environments

Date: June 5, 2003
Creator: A. Anderko, P. Wang, R. D. Young, D. P. Riemer, P. McKenzie and M. M. Lencka (OLI Systems Inc.) & Laboratory), S. S. Babu and P. Angelini (Oak Ridge National
Description: Corrosion is much less predictable in organic or mixed-solvent environments than in aqueous process environments. As a result, US chemical companies face greater uncertainty when selecting process equipment materials to manufacture chemical products using organic or mixed solvents than when the process environments are only aqueous. Chemical companies handle this uncertainty by overdesigning the equipment (wasting money and energy), rather than by accepting increased risks of corrosion failure (personnel hazards and environmental releases). Therefore, it is important to develop simulation tools that would help the chemical process industries to understand and predict corrosion and to develop mitigation measures. To create such tools, we have developed models that predict (1) the chemical composition, speciation, phase equilibria, component activities and transport properties of the bulk (aqueous, nonaqueous or mixed) phase that is in contact with the metal; (2) the phase equilibria and component activities of the alloy phase(s) that may be subject to corrosion and (3) the interfacial phenomena that are responsible for corrosion at the metal/solution or passive film/solution interface. During the course of this project, we have completed the following: (1) Development of thermodynamic modules for calculating the activities of alloy components; (2) Development of software that generates stability diagrams ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Cast Metal Coalition Research and Development Closeout Report

Cast Metal Coalition Research and Development Closeout Report

Date: August 1, 2000
Creator: Allen, D.
Description: The Cast Metal Coalition, composed of more than 22 research providers and universities and 149 industrial partners, has completed a four-year research and development partnership with the Department of Energy. This report provides brief summaries of the 29 projects performed by the Coalition. These projects generated valuable information in such aspects of the metals industry as process prediction technologies, quality control, improved alloys, product machinability, and casting process improvements.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
4th International Plant Biomechanics Conference Proceedings (Abstracts)

4th International Plant Biomechanics Conference Proceedings (Abstracts)

Date: July 20, 2003
Creator: Telewski, Frank W.; Koehler, Lothar H. & Ewers, Frank W.
Description: The 4th International Plant Biomechanics Conference facilitated an interdisciplinary exchange between scientists, engineers, and educators addressing the major questions encountered in the field of Plant Biomechanics. Subjects covered by the conference include: Evolution; Ecology; Mechanoreception; Cell Walls; Genetic Modification; Applied Biomechanics of Whole Plants, Plant Products, Fibers & Composites; Fluid Dynamics; Wood & Trees; Fracture Mechanics; Xylem Pressure & Water Transport; Modeling; and Introducing Plant Biomechanics in Secondary School Education.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Role of Transport Phenomena in the Evolution of Geometry, Composition and Structure

Role of Transport Phenomena in the Evolution of Geometry, Composition and Structure

Date: November 17, 2005
Creator: DebRoy, Tarasankar
Description: Abstract Fusion welding is used extensively in industries that support the nation's energy supply, defense, infrastructure, and standard of living. Safety and reliability of the welded joints are affected by their geometry, composition and structure. This report provides an account of the significant advances made in quantitative understanding of the geometry, composition and various aspects of the weldment structure with financial support from DOE/BES. In particular, this report provides an account of the research conducted under the grant DE-FG02-84ER45158 in this important area and lists all the publications that document the details of the technical accomplishments that resulted from the work. Investigations of heat transfer, fluid flow and alloying element vaporization during laser welding resulted in a new technique for the determination of the peak temperature in the weld pool and provided a new method to estimate weld metal composition. Studies on the interfacial phenomena in fusion welding resulted in quantitative understanding of the interrelationship between the weld metal composition and geometry and provided new knowledge as to when the surface active elements would affect the weldment geometry and when these elements would have no effect on the geometry. Partitioning of oxygen nitrogen and hydrogen between the welding environment and ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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