Newsmap. Monday, August 9, 1943 : week of July 29 to August 5, 204th week of the war, 86th week of U.S. participation

Newsmap. Monday, August 9, 1943 : week of July 29 to August 5, 204th week of the war, 86th week of U.S. participation

Date: August 9, 1943
Creator: [United States.] Army Orientation Course
Description: Front: Text describes action on various war fronts: Italy, Sicily, Rumania, Russia, Germany, Burma-China, Southwest Pacific. Map: Strategic air distances across the Mediterranean./ Relief shown by hachures. Photographs: Army engineers work in the Aluetians; A Tommy reads "Soldier's guide to Sicily"; Royal Artillery Detachment stationed north of Syracuse, Sicily examines damage done by Italians to a mobile anti-aircraft train; Nazis surrender to U.S. Infantrymen near Carlentini; Junkers-290 transport shot down by an RAF Marauder near the coast of Bastia, Corsica; U.S. Marines push a generator into position near Munda; Japanese interpreters of the U.S. Army decipher papers found on a wounded Japanese officer; A winch pulls a mud-splattered jeep free on Rendova; 155mm rifle sends rounds into Munda from Rendova Island. Back: [text and ill.]: The long, tough fight ahead : beyond sunny Italy!/ Back text includes quote from the President of the United States, July 28, 1943: "I confess that I myself am sometimes bewildered by conflicting statements that I see in the press ..."
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Preliminary maps of crustal thickness and regional seismic phases for the Middle East and North Africa

Preliminary maps of crustal thickness and regional seismic phases for the Middle East and North Africa

Date: September 6, 1995
Creator: Sweeney, J.J.
Description: As part of the development of regional seismic discrimination methods for the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) the author is building a database of information related to seismic propagation and crustal structure as well as associated geologic-tectonic and geophysical data. He hopes to use these data to construct and test models of regional seismic propagation and evaluate various detection/discrimination scenarios. To date, the database has been developed by building on a list of references for MENA provided by the Institute for the Study of the Continents (INSTOC) at Cornell University. To this list the author has added an equal number of references resulting from his own literature search which has emphasized papers dealing with seismicity and regional and teleseismic phase data. This paper represents an initial attempt to consolidate some of the information from the database into a form useful to researchers modeling regional seismic waveforms. The information compiled in this report is supplemental to the INSTOC database and has not been compiled anywhere else. What follows is a series of maps which illustrate the spatial variation of seismic phase velocities and crustal thickness. The text identifies the sources of information used in the map preparation. Data for the ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Status report of propagation models: Middle East and North Africa (S5.3)

Status report of propagation models: Middle East and North Africa (S5.3)

Date: November 1, 1995
Creator: Schultz, C.A.; Patton, H.J. & Goldstein, P.
Description: An improved understanding of the influence that tectonic structure has on regional seismic phases is needed to improve the current performance of regional discriminants and their transportability to the Middle East and North Africa. In the case that the crustal structure can be approximated by a flat layered laterally invariant medium, layer-cake reflectivity modeling can be used to obtain an accurate representation of regional phases. However, a laterally heterogeneous crust is just as common as a layered cake structure and in this case large variations in regional phase amplitudes are not uncommon. For instance, it has been shown that rough surface topography and undulations in the Moho can cause the transfer of energy between various surface wave modes and between surface waves and body waves greatly increasing the potential variability of seismic phases. Larger scale structure such as thickening or thinning of the crust can also greatly affect phase propagation. In some instances, changes between different tectonic regions such as that which occurs at a continental-oceanic boundary can completely block phases such as Lg rendering certain discriminants useless. In addition to structure along the path, lateral structure and free surface topography near the source and receiver can cause complex scattering ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Relocation of Gulf of Aqaba earthquakes using the JSOP Bulletin

Relocation of Gulf of Aqaba earthquakes using the JSOP Bulletin

Date: July 3, 1997
Creator: Sweeney, J.J.
Description: Ground truth information (i.e. precise information about the hypocenter and origin time of aseismic event) is difficult to obtain in the Middle East and North Africa region. One source of ground truth we are attempting to exploit is data from local seismic networks. An electronic bulletin from the second phase of the Joint Seismic Observation Period (JSOP), with participating countries in the eastern Mediterranean region, provides a source of local network data not ordinarily available. I have used JSOP bulletin data for the period January 1996 through June 1996 to relocate over 100 earthquakes occurring in and around the Gulf of Aqaba. Fourteen of these earthquakes have picks in the bulletin for stations surrounding the Gulf (Egypt Saudi Arabia, Israel,and Jordan). The rest of the data involves picks for stations either in Israel, Jordan, and Saudi Arabia (east side and north of the Gulf) or for stations in Israel, Jordan, and Egypt (west side and north of the Gulf). The VELEST code (Joint Hypocenter Determination method) was used to calculate improved locations (over what can be obtained from single event determinations--SED with poor station configurations) for the all the earthquakes in the data set. Location differences between the JHD solution ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Comparison of gridded versus observation data to initialize ARAC dispersion models for the Algeciras, Spain steel mill CS-137 release

Comparison of gridded versus observation data to initialize ARAC dispersion models for the Algeciras, Spain steel mill CS-137 release

Date: May 28, 1999
Creator: Aluzzi, F J; Pace, J C; Pobanz, B M & Vogt, P J
Description: On May 30, 1998 scrap metal containing radioactive Cesium-137 (Cs-137) was accidentally melted in a furnace at the Acerinox steel mill in Algeciras, Spain. Cs-137 was released from the mill's smokestack, and spread across the western Mediterranean Sea to France and Italy and beyond. The first indication of the release was radiation levels up to 1000 times background reported by Swiss, French, and Italian authorities during the following two weeks. Initially no elevated radiation levels were detected over Spain. A release of hazardous material to the atmosphere is the type of situation the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) emergency response organization was designed to address. The amount and exact time of the release were unknown, though the incident was thought to have taken place during the last week in May. Using air concentration measurements supplied by colleagues of ARAC in Spain, France, Switzerland, Italy, Sweden, Russia and the European Union, ARAC meteorologists estimated the magnitude and timing of the release (Vogt, 1999). Correctly locating the downwind footprint is the most important goal of emergency response modeling. In this study, we compare predicted results for the Algeciras event based on four wind data sources: (1) US Navy Operational Global Atmospheric Prediction ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department