Sunbonnet

Sunbonnet

Date: 1910
Creator: unknown
Description: Sunbonnet of blue cotton with white lace trim. The brim is slightly square-shaped and heavily starched. The top of the crown is stitched to the brim in a flat seam, with fullness created in the lower crown through a set of 3 snaps on each side which fasten the crown to the brim, giving the lower crown a crenelated shape. The bonnet has no tail, and has self-fabric chin ties of blue ribbon. The left tie is formed from two pieces of fabric pieced together, while the right tie is of a single length of fabric. The ties are narrow hemmed, except for one side of a lower section of left tie, which is cut along the selvage and left unfinished. There are no labels or marks in the piece. The fact that this bonnet does not have a tail probably indicates that this was a visiting bonnet rather than a field bonnet. The TFC thanks Rebecca Jumper Matheson for her research on this object.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
Sunbonnet

Sunbonnet

Date: 1900/1909
Creator: unknown
Description: Sunbonnet of off-white calico cotton with a tiny repeated print of three stylized leaves in brown. The brim of the hat is quilted in L-shaped rows of stitching and is very stiff from starch and stiffening material within it. The crown is gathered along the entire length of the seam where it attaches to the brim. The crown and tail are formed from a single piece of fabric, and the tail is stitched flat to the lower sides of brim. The neck is adjustable, having outer neck ties stitched to the lower corners of the brim on both sides. The chin ties are of the same fabric, with unfinished edges. The long tail on the bonnet indicates that it was used as a field bonnet. The TFC thanks Rebecca Jumper Matheson for her research on this object.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
Sunbonnet

Sunbonnet

Date: 1830/1839
Creator: unknown
Description: Sunbonnet of tan and blue braided straw. The hat has a wired brim and a grayish-white silk lining. It is trimmed in tan silk ribbon, and the bavolet, or back panel which shades the neck, is composed of brown, brick red, tan and blue striped cotton fabric. The ties are of brown silk taffeta and are attached to lower edge of brim with a herringbone stitch. The TFC thanks Rebecca Jumper Matheson for her research on this object.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
Sunbonnet

Sunbonnet

Date: 1890/1899
Creator: unknown
Description: Sunbonnet of brown linen. Made of a plain weave with both white and brown threads, the hat has pasteboard staves within the brim, a crenelated buttoning crown and long tail. The crown and tail are separate pieces, sewn together at neck seam, with the tail fastening to the sides of the brim by 3 off-white buttons on each side. The tail is semi-circular in shape, and the narrow chin ties are hemmed by hand. Poke-style bonnets are generally those that have brims stiffened either through quilting or plain starched fabric. Sunbonnets that rely on staves for brim support are not considered poke-style sunbonnets. The TFC thanks Rebecca Jumper Matheson for her research on this object.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
Sunbonnet

Sunbonnet

Date: 1850
Creator: unknown
Description: Sunbonnet of black silk taffeta. The brim of the hat has 6 shirred hoops with deep padding in between, and a ruffled edge of the same fabric. At center back of neck, on the tail of the hat, is a flat bow of black silk taffeta, and the ties are of black silk taffeta ribbon. The crown is lined with brown glazed cotton fabric. The TFC thanks Rebecca Jumper Matheson for her research on this object.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
Sunbonnet

Sunbonnet

Date: 1890/1899
Creator: unknown
Description: Sunbonnet of white cotton broadcloth. The hat has a square-shaped brim with an outer layer of off-white weave material with a plain-weave backing, and crocheted trim. The brim is thin and does not appear to contain much stiffening material or starch. The crenelated crown fastens to brim by a series of 9 buttons on top and 2 buttons on each side. The crown is trimmed with the same crocheted trim as is the brim. The crown and tail are of a made of a single length of fabric. The TFC thanks Rebecca Jumper Matheson for her research on this object.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design