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Models of Consultation, Referral Problems and the Perceived Effectiveness of Parent and Teacher Consultation

Models of Consultation, Referral Problems and the Perceived Effectiveness of Parent and Teacher Consultation

Date: December 1986
Creator: Epperson, Sidney Reins
Description: This study evaluated the school psychologist's perception of effective models of consultation based upon referral problem and parent, teacher, and student response to treatment. Analyses of covariance determined that (a) parents' receptivity and total number of teacher contacts significantly influenced the parents' response to treatment; (b) teacher receptivity and total number of parent contacts significantly affected teachers' response to treatment; (c) students' response to treatment was significantly affected by the model of teacher consultation and the average number of minutes spent with the school psychologists; and (d) students in a Mental Health consultation group responded significantly more favorably than s tudents in Behavioral or Collaborative consultation groups.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Social Skills Training with High-Functioning Autistic Adolescents

Social Skills Training with High-Functioning Autistic Adolescents

Date: August 1988
Creator: Eversole, Amy
Description: Social skills training is a need among autistic adolescents. This investigation examined a social skills training program involving several teaching strategies. Specific social skills were targeted for improvement. Attempts to decrease negative social behaviors were made. Five autistic adolescents participated in the program and five were selected for the no-treatment group. Two measures were used. A survey addressing the skills targeted in the program was completed by parents and teachers before and after the program. A test conversation with a stranger and a peer was conducted with each subject before and after the program. Anecdotal information was obtained from therapists, teachers, and parents. Results provided information on the effectiveness of this social skills program. The benefits and limitations of the program were discussed.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Criteria and Assessment Measures for Diagnosing Learning Disabled Children

Criteria and Assessment Measures for Diagnosing Learning Disabled Children

Date: May 1986
Creator: Moyer, Melynda Karol
Description: A total of 60 school psychologists and educational diagnosticians across Texas completed a survey to identify the instruments used to screen and diagnose learning disabled (LD) students, and to identify the criteria on which the final diagnosis and placement of LD or non-LD is made. The results of this survey indicate that consistent methods and criteria are not being used for identifying children as LD within the state. Many of the instruments currently used may not be technically adequate for use with a LD population. Implications of the use of inconsistent criteria, inadequate screening and assessment measures are discussed.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Effects of Gender and Self-Monitoring on Observer Accuracy in Decoding Affect Displays

Effects of Gender and Self-Monitoring on Observer Accuracy in Decoding Affect Displays

Date: December 1982
Creator: Spencer, R. Keith (Raymond Keith)
Description: This study examined gender and self-monitoring as separate and interacting variables predicting judgmental accuracy on the part of observers of facial expressions of emotional categories. The main and interaction effects failed to reach significant levels during the preliminary analysis. However, post hoc analyses demonstrated a significant encoder sex variable. Female encoders of emotion were judged more accurately by both sexes. Additionally, when the stimulus was limited to female enactments of emotional categories, the hypothesized main and interaction effects reached significant F levels. This study utilized 100 observers and 10 encoders of seven emotional categories. Methodological considerations and alternatives are examined at length.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Influence of Family Environment on Ease of Discussion of Sexual Issues With a Partner

Influence of Family Environment on Ease of Discussion of Sexual Issues With a Partner

Date: May 1995
Creator: Broodo, Beth (Beth Lauren)
Description: The purpose of the present study was to investigate the relationship between ease of discussion of sexual likes and dislikes with a sexual partner and religious, expressive, and affectional influences in the family of origin.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Effects of Cultural Bias: a Comparison of the WISC-R and the WISC-III

The Effects of Cultural Bias: a Comparison of the WISC-R and the WISC-III

Date: December 1994
Creator: Ewing, Melissa Cox
Description: It has been suggested that the use of standardized intelligence tests is biased against minorities. This study investigates the newly revised Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-III in which Wechsler states that the new scale has eliminated biased items. Comparisons of the scores on the WISC-R and the WISC-III of a clinical population of sixteen African American and eighteen Caucasian males, ages ten to sixteen, revealed significant differences between the two groups on the WISC-III. The minority scores decreased predictably from the WISC-R to the WISC-III, but the Caucasian scores increased rather than decreasing. The findings of this study do not support the predictions and goals of revision as stated in the manual of the WISC-III.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Interpersonal Decentering and Psychopathology in a University Clinic Sample

Interpersonal Decentering and Psychopathology in a University Clinic Sample

Date: May 2008
Creator: Burkman, Summer D.
Description: This study examined the relationship between interpersonal decentering and symptoms of psychopathology among 48 clients from the Psychology Clinic at the University of North Texas. The Thematic Apperception Test (TAT) and the Symptom Checklist 90-Revised (SCL-90-R®) instrument were administered to clients along with demographic packets. Interpersonal decentering was assessed using Melvin Feffer's Interpersonal Decentering Scoring System for the TAT. It was hypothesized that higher scores of global symptom severity would be associated with lower scores of interpersonal decentering. Higher scores of paranoid ideation, psychoticism, and hostility were also hypothesized to be associated with lower scores of interpersonal decentering. Results did not support these hypotheses. However, exploratory analyses revealed a significant correlation between higher scores of phobic anxiety and lower scores of interpersonal decentering. Results also provided information regarding the three methods for calculating interpersonal decentering summary scores.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Acculturation Level, Generational Status and Gender: Their Role in Acculturative Stress in Young Adolescent Mexican Americans

Acculturation Level, Generational Status and Gender: Their Role in Acculturative Stress in Young Adolescent Mexican Americans

Date: August 2004
Creator: Manning, Suzanne C.
Description: The purpose of this study was to determine relationships between acculturation level, generational status, and gender with acculturative stress. Acculturation level was determined by the Acculturation Rating Scale for Mexican Americans-II (ARSMA-II) and acculturative stress was determined by the Societal, Attitudinal, Familial and Environmental Acculturative Stress Scale-Children's Version (SAFE-C). Subjects included 1268 Hispanic children ages 11-15. In order to validate the usefulness of the ARSMA-II with this sample, analyses were conducted between acculturation level and generational status. The Pearson product moment correlation (r=.44) and the ANOVA between the mean acculturation score and generational status were significant. However, the mean acculturation score from this study was considerably lower than the ARSMA-II score; therefore, new acculturation levels were developed to establish local adolescent norms for the ARSMA-II. All analyses involving acculturation levels were conducted using both the ARSMA-II and new acculturation levels because 300 subjects were reclassified with the new norms. Significant results were similar using both acculturation levels; however, there were more between group differences using the new acculturation levels. It was hypothesized that as acculturation level increased toward the Anglo culture, acculturative stress would decrease. The one-way ANOVA confirmed this relationship. It was also hypothesized that as generational status increased, ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Hierarchical neuropsychological functioning in pediatric survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

Hierarchical neuropsychological functioning in pediatric survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

Date: August 2007
Creator: Larery, Angela R. D.
Description: Acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) is one of the most common types of pediatric cancers. Improvements in treatment within the last 20 years have resulted in reduced mortality and a greater focus upon quality of life. Several researchers have documented neuropsychological impairments in children following treatment for ALL; however, there have not been any comparative studies documenting differences in neuropsychological functioning based upon treatment modality despite the documented effects of radiation therapy and combined radiation/chemotherapy upon the developing brain. In addition, past studies have focused on unitary measures, ignoring the hierarchical relationship between basic cognitive functions and more abstract skills. This study examined the neuropsychological functioning of 81 children who were treated for ALL at a metropolitan children's hospital. All children were tested a minimum of two years after the final treatment session and were administered the NEPSY. Results do not support any interactions or main effects with the exception of the age of the child at diagnosis. Children diagnosed prior to the age of 5 showed greater impairments on tasks measuring attention, memory, and visuospatial reasoning in comparison to peers diagnosed after age 6.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Efficacy of Filial Therapy with Families with Chronically Ill Children

The Efficacy of Filial Therapy with Families with Chronically Ill Children

Date: May 1997
Creator: Tew, Kristi L. (Kristi Lee)
Description: This study was designed to determine the effectiveness of Filial Therapy as a method of intervention with families with chronically ill children. Filial Therapy is an intervention that focuses on strengthening and enhancing the parent-child relationship. Parents are trained to become the agents of change for their children's behaviors by utilizing basic child-centered play therapy skills in weekly play sessions. The purpose of this study was to a) determine the effectiveness in decreasing parental stress, b) determine the effectiveness in increasing parental acceptance, and c) determine the effectiveness in decreasing problematic behaviors in the chronically ill child as assessed by their parents.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Effect of the Home Environment on Children's 10 Scores and the Influence of Family Socioeconomic Status

Effect of the Home Environment on Children's 10 Scores and the Influence of Family Socioeconomic Status

Date: May 1994
Creator: Singer, David D.
Description: Contributions of home environment and family socioeconomic status (SES) on the intelligence test performance of 24 exceptional children aged five through seven years were investigated. It was hypothesized that higher SES would enrich the children's environment providing a more stimulating learning experience, and would reflect a positive correlation with measures of the home environment. Additional hypotheses were that both HOME scores and SES scales would show a positive correlation with intelligence test performance. The positive association found between SES and HOME Inventory scores suggests that families with a higher SES have the ability to direct more resources toward their children. However, according to the present study, this does not affect the intelligence test performance of exceptional children.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Children's Perceived Contingency of Teacher Reinforcements Measured with a Specific Scale, Helplessness and Academic Performance

Children's Perceived Contingency of Teacher Reinforcements Measured with a Specific Scale, Helplessness and Academic Performance

Date: May 1994
Creator: Mayo, Albert Elton
Description: A specifically oriented instrument was used to partially replicate a study by Dietz (1988) in an effort to compare the utility of the phi coefficient and Rescorla index measures of perceived contingency of reinforcement in children and examine the relationship of these measures to locus of control, teacher ratings of helplessness and academic performance.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Performance of Children With and Without Traumatic Brain Injury on the Process Scoring System for the Intermediate Category Test

Performance of Children With and Without Traumatic Brain Injury on the Process Scoring System for the Intermediate Category Test

Date: May 1997
Creator: Bass, Catherine
Description: The clinical utility of the Intermediate Category Test, a measure of executive functioning in children 9 to 14 years of age, is currently limited by the availability of only a Total Error score for normative interpretation. The Process Scoring System (PSS) was developed to provide a standardized method of assessing specific processing patterns and problem-solving errors. The purpose of this study was to determine the ability of the PSS scores to discriminate between children with and without suspected executive deficits, thereby providing evidence of criterion-related validity.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
A Tagmemic Analysis of Coherence in the Writing of Descriptive Texts by College Students

A Tagmemic Analysis of Coherence in the Writing of Descriptive Texts by College Students

Date: August 1988
Creator: Kent, Carolyn E. (Carolyn Elizabeth)
Description: For this study an attempt was made to bridge the disciplines of linguistics and composition in order to examine factors contributing to textual coherence. Pairs of descriptive texts written by fifty college students were examined in order to identify the factors which differentiate quality and topic. Students were asked to compose a descriptive paragraph on the topic of fall. They were then encouraged to use their five senses, given leaves, and asked to compose a paragraph describing the leaves. The pairs of texts thus elicited were evaluated for preference by readers. The ANOVA revealed a significant difference (p=.001) between the two topics with fall texts preferred over the more specific leaves texts. Results suggest that encouraging students to use their five senses does not improve their writing. It may be more important to move through various levels of abstraction than to merely focus on sensory detail. The texts were also scored holistically by two trained evaluators. Results of this grading were used to choose five high- and five low-coherence texts on each of the two topics. These 20 texts were then analyzed in terms of the tagmemic referential hierarchy. A MANOVA was done to examine the dependent variables of Slot ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Influence of Self-Monitoring on Return Rate Following Intake at a Child Guidance Clinic

The Influence of Self-Monitoring on Return Rate Following Intake at a Child Guidance Clinic

Date: December 1986
Creator: Matthews, Catherine Henson
Description: Research has yet to identify any characteristics of clients, therapists, or treatment dyads which consistently identify those clients most likely to drop out of treatment. A frame of reference which may prove useful in identifying such clients is the social psychological construct of selfmonitoring. This theory proposes that individuals involved in any social encounter differ from each other in their approach to constructing a relevant self-presentation. High self-monitors emphasize matching their behavior to situational cues while low self-monitors match their behavior to perceived internal values and traits. The present study demonstrates the effects that selfmonitoring styles of therapists and clients have on the effectiveness of a therapeutic intake interview and the client's decision whether or not to return for treatment. Additionally examined are the effects of therapist selfmonitoring style on theoretical orientations toward psychotherapy. The hypothesis that pairings of high self-monitors would be most effective is tested by Chi-square and found to be nonsignificant. Using the Chi-square test, low self-monitoring therapists are found to endorse a single approach to therapy and to strongly endorse the psychoanalytical orientation. Low self-monitors are found to be eclectic in approach. Satisfaction with the interview is examined using ANOVA. Results are nonsignificant with the exception ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Perceptions of Temperament Characteristics of Children Classified as Learning Disabled

Perceptions of Temperament Characteristics of Children Classified as Learning Disabled

Date: August 1986
Creator: Cardell, Cheryl Dianne Elizabeth
Description: This study addresses how the temperament characteristics of seven year old learning disabled students are viewed in relation to those of the normally achieving students. Teacher perceptions, parent perceptions, and teacher versus parent perceptions are examined utilizing the six dimensions (activity, adaptability, approach/withdrawal, intensity, distractibility, and persistence) and the three factors (emotionality, sociability, and persistence) of the Temperament Assessment Battery.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Predictors of Use and Outcomes of Youth and Family Centers

Predictors of Use and Outcomes of Youth and Family Centers

Date: May 2001
Creator: Scharff, Karen
Description: This study analyzed data from Dallas Public Schools and Dallas Youth and Family Centers (YFCs) to explore variables associated with referrals to and utilization of Youth and Family Centers. Data from students enrolled in third, eighth or tenth grade during the 1996-1997, 1997-1998 and 1998-1999 school years were analyzed to determine the reasons for YFC referral and utilization, and to compare standardized test scores and attendance. Of the 6956 students in third, eighth and tenth grades initially referred to YFCs during those three school years, 5173 (74.3%) made at least one YFC visit. The 5173 students made an average of 2.69 visits and accessed an average of 1.18 services per year. Medical visits accounted for 42.5% of YFC visits, and mental health visits accounted for 46% of YFC visits. Results of logistic regression analyses indicate a significant difference for utilization upon referral and continued use of the YFC when the constant is compared to a set of predictor variables. For both analyses, the predictor variables were Chapter I status, LEP status, reason for referral, gender, special education status, ethnicity, distance from home school to referral YFC, food stamp eligibility and referral source. While outcome data regarding attendance and scores on ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Differences in IQ Scores, Referral Source and Presenting Problem Between Boys and Girls Diagnosed ADD-H

Differences in IQ Scores, Referral Source and Presenting Problem Between Boys and Girls Diagnosed ADD-H

Date: August 1986
Creator: Harbeitner, Mary Hilado
Description: The purpose of this research was to investigate the possibility that there are sex differences between ADD-H boys and girls. ADD-H boys and girls were compared on the four variables of presenting problem, referral source, intelligence test performance on the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised (WISC-R) and WISC-R subtest configuration. General demographics of the ADD-H boys and girls families were also examined. The subjects participating in this study were 39 girls and 41 boys from a large child outpatient facility in the Dallas/Fort Worth metroplex diagnosed as ADD-H between February 1984 and February 1986. No differences were found when comparing ADD-H boys and girls on all four variables. These results may suggest that there are no real differences in regards to presenting problem, referral source, IQ scores and subtest configuration between boys and girls diagnosed ADD-H.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Validity of Two Childhood Autism Rating Instruments for Use with Autistic Adolescents

Validity of Two Childhood Autism Rating Instruments for Use with Autistic Adolescents

Date: May 1986
Creator: McCallon, Denise
Description: It is now known that autism is a lifelong handicapping condition. While some of the characteristic behaviors of autistic children remain unchanged in adolescence and adulthood, there is evidence that other behaviors change as a function of development. Assessment instruments for identifying autism are generally intended for use with. young children and may not accurately assess autism in adolescents. Two studies compared autistic adolescents with matched autistic children and nonautistic adolescents on two autism rating scales. The validity of the Childhood Autism Rating Scale for use with adolescents was supported while the validity of the Prescreening Checklist was questioned. The findings were discussed in relation to the age-related changes which occur in autistic adolescents.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Parental Expectations of Social-Emotional and Self-Help/Self-Direction Development in Abused Children

Parental Expectations of Social-Emotional and Self-Help/Self-Direction Development in Abused Children

Date: May 1988
Creator: Costas, Lisa Daniels
Description: The present study examined the existence of unrealistic expectations in abusive parents. It was hypothesized that abusive parents would have higher expectations of their children's social-emotional and self-help skills than nonabusive parents. It was also hypothesized that abusive parents would have higher expectations of their children's social-emotional skills than nonabusive parents when both groups compared their children to average children. Abusive and nonabusive parents were administered the Social Competence Scales of the Child Behavior Checklist and the Daily Living Skills domain of the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales. The results contradict previous studies in this area and raise questions about present conceptualizations of expectations in abusive parents and the importance of this factor in child abuse.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Social Skills Training with Verbal Autistic Adolescents: A Case Study Approach

Social Skills Training with Verbal Autistic Adolescents: A Case Study Approach

Date: August 1988
Creator: Nichols, Jill Howard
Description: Autistic adolescents need direct, systematic training of social skills since major difficulties in communication, lack of empathy, and various changes during adolescence present major roadblocks to the acquisition of normal peer relationships and increasing independence. A case study approach was utilized to examine treatment effects of a social skills training program implemented with four autistic adolescent boys in a naturalistic setting. Findings based on objective measures and subjective reports indicated that each subject made gains in targeted social skills over the course of treatment. Treatment strategies such as modeling, coaching, roleplaying, one to one instruction, and in vivo procedures were found to be effective teaching techniques. Major benefits and limitations of the study were discussed.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
A Comparison of Behavioral Therapy and Contextual Therapy for the Treatment of Overweight

A Comparison of Behavioral Therapy and Contextual Therapy for the Treatment of Overweight

Date: May 1984
Creator: Mathews, Matt
Description: The purpose of the present study is to compare a "traditional" behavioral therapy approach (based on selfcontrol techniques) with a previously unresearched "contextual therapy" for the treatment of overweight. The remainder of this chapter is devoted to a discussion of a variety of relevant behavioral techniques, an evaluation of them, and a discussion of a contextual model for the treatment of overweight.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Importance of Staff Cohesiveness in Treatment Effectiveness as Demonstrated by Client Self-Disclosure

The Importance of Staff Cohesiveness in Treatment Effectiveness as Demonstrated by Client Self-Disclosure

Date: December 1984
Creator: MacMullan, Peter Alex
Description: Much research has studied cohesiveness within client groups in terms of making therapeutic gains. These studies have defined cohesiveness in terms of a) attraction of the group as perceived by a group member, b) how clearly each member sees his/her role within the group, and c) the effectiveness of one's skills in attaining group goals. Little research has dealt with the role of staff cohesiveness in developing an effective treatment program. Effectiveness, in this study, is defined as the degree to which clients are willing to disclose personal information to the staff. The results show a positive correlation between staff's perceived effectiveness with clients and the clients' willingness to self-disclose. On-hand experience with clients seems important in involving clients in therapy.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Effects of School Performance on the Self-Concept and Locus of Control of Learning Disabled and Emotionally Disturbed Elementary Students

The Effects of School Performance on the Self-Concept and Locus of Control of Learning Disabled and Emotionally Disturbed Elementary Students

Date: May 1984
Creator: Ronalder, Ronnie Lee
Description: A number of authors have suggested recently that the behavioral characteristics and self-perceptions of learning disabled and emotionally disturbed children are so similar as to negate the fruitfulness of trying to differentiate between these two groups. These characteristics are quite similar for the two special education groups when they have been compared independently of each other to regular education students. In order to provide support for these prior studies, the self-concepts and locus of control of 36 learning disabled, emotionally disturbed, and regular education students were compared. A significant difference was found between the LD and RE students in terms of self-concept only. No significant differences were noted between the ED and RE students. These results are discussed in relation to the somewhat conflicting results of prior studies with implications for future research.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
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