A Computational Study on 18+δ Organometallics

A Computational Study on 18+δ Organometallics

Date: May 2002
Creator: Yu, Liwen
Description: The B3LYP density functional has been used to calculate properties of organometallic complexes of Co(CO)3 and ReBr(CO)3, with the chelating ligand 2,3-bisphosphinomaleic anhydride, in 19- and 18-electron forms. The SBKJC-21G effective core potential and associated basis set was used for metals (Co/Re) and the 6-31G* basis set was used for all other elements. The differences of bond angles, bond distances, natural atomic charges and IR vibrational frequencies were compared with the available experimental parameters. The differences between the 19- and 18-electron systems have been analyzed. The results reveal that the 19th electron is mostly distributed over the ligand of 2,3-bisphosphinomaleic anhydride, although partially localized onto the metal fragment in 1 and 2*. Two different methods, IR-frequencies and natural atomic charges, were used to determine the value of δ. Present computed values of δ are compared with available experimental values, and predictions are made for unknown complexes.
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Kinetics of Sulfur: Experimental Study of the Reaction of Atomic Sulfur with Acetylene and Theoretical Study of the Cn + So Potential Energy Surface

Kinetics of Sulfur: Experimental Study of the Reaction of Atomic Sulfur with Acetylene and Theoretical Study of the Cn + So Potential Energy Surface

Date: May 2013
Creator: Ayling, Sean A.
Description: The kinetics of the reaction of atomic sulfur with acetylene (S (3P) + C2H2) were investigated experimentally via the flash photolysis resonance fluorescence method, and the theoretical potential energy surface for the reaction CN + SO was modeled via the density functional and configuration interaction computational methods. Sulfur is of interest in modern chemistry due to its relevance in combustion and atmospheric chemistry, in the Claus process, in soot and diamond-film formation and in astrochemistry. Experimental conditions ranged from 295 – 1015 K and 10 – 400 Torr of argon. Pressure-dependence was shown at all experimental temperatures. The room temperature high-pressure limit second order rate constant was (2.10 ± 0.08) × 10-13 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. The Arrhenius plot of the high-pressure limit rate constants gave an Ea of (11.34 ± 0.03) kJ mol-1 and a pre-exponential factor of (2.14 ± 0.19) × 10-11 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. S (3P) + C2H2 is likely an adduct forming reaction due to pressure-dependence (also supported by a statistical mechanics analysis) which involves intersystem crossing. The potential energy surface for CN + SO was calculated at the B3LYP/6-311G(d) level and refined at the QCISD/6-311G(d) level. The PES was compared to that of the analogous reaction ...
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Kinetic Investigation of the Gas Phase Atomic Sulfur and Nitrogen Dioxide Reaction

Kinetic Investigation of the Gas Phase Atomic Sulfur and Nitrogen Dioxide Reaction

Date: May 2011
Creator: Thompson, Kristopher Michael
Description: The kinetics of the reaction of atomic sulfur and nitrogen dioxide have been investigated over the temperature range 298 to 650 K and pressures from 14 - 405 mbar using the laser flash photolysis - resonance fluorescence technique. The overall bimolecular rate expression k (T) = (1.88 ± 0.49) x10-11 exp-(4.14 ± 0.10 kJ mol-1)/RT cm3 molecule-1 s-1 is derived. Ab initio calculations were performed at the CCSD(T)/CBS level of theory and a potential energy surface has been derived. RRKM theory calculations were performed on the system. It is found that an initially formed SNO2 is vibrationally excited and the rate of collisional stabilization is slower than the rate of dissociation to SO + NO products by a factor of 100 - 1000, under the experimental conditions.
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Investigation of the Pressure Dependence of SO3    Formation

Investigation of the Pressure Dependence of SO3 Formation

Date: December 2003
Creator: Naidoo, Jacinth
Description: The kinetics of the pressure dependent O + SO2 + Ar reaction have been investigated using laser photolysis resonance fluorescence at temperatures of 289 K, 399 K, 581 K, 699 K, 842 K and 1040 K and at pressures from 30-665 torr. Falloff was observed for the first time in the pressure dependence. Application of Lindemann theory yielded an Arrhenius expression of k(T) = 3.3 x 10-32exp(-992/T) cm6 molecule-1 s-1 for the low pressure limit and k(T) = 8.47 x 10-14exp(-468/T) cm3 molecule-1 s-1 for the high pressure limit at temperatures between 289 and 842 K. The reaction is unusual as it possesses a positive activation energy at low temperature, yet at higher temperatures the activation energy is negative, illustrating a reaction barrier.
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Investigations of Thermochemistry and the Kinetics of H Atom Radical Reactions

Investigations of Thermochemistry and the Kinetics of H Atom Radical Reactions

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: December 2002
Creator: Peebles, Lynda Renee
Description: The thermochemistry of several species, and the kinetics of various H atom radical reactions relevant to atmospheric and combustion chemistry were investigated using ab initio theoretical techniques and the flash photolysis / resonance fluorescence technique. Using ab initio quantum mechanical calculations up to the G3 level of theory, the C-H bond strengths of several alkanes were calculated. The bond strengths were calculated using two working reactions. From the results, it is apparent that the bond strengths decrease as methyl groups are added to the central carbon. The results are in good agreement with recent experimental halogenation kinetic studies. Hydrogen bond strengths with sulfur and oxygen were studied via CCSD(T) theory, together with extrapolation to the complete basis set limit. The results for the bond dissociation energies (ground state at 0 K, units: kJ mol-1) are: S-H = 349.9, S-D = 354.7, HS-H = 376.2, DS-D = 383.4, and HO-H = 492.6. These data compare well with experimental literature. The rate constants for the isotopic reactions of H + H2S, D + H2S, H + D2S, and D + D2S are studied at the QCISD(T)/6-311+G(3df,2p) level of theory. The contributions of the exchange reaction versus abstraction are examined through transition state ...
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Synthesis and properties of novel cage-functionalized crown ethers and cryptands.

Synthesis and properties of novel cage-functionalized crown ethers and cryptands.

Date: August 2001
Creator: Hazlewood, Anna
Description: A novel cryptand was synthesized which contained a 3,5-disubstituted-4- oxahexacyclo[5.4.1.02,6.03,10.05,9.08,11] dodecane "cage" moiety. In alkali metal picrate extraction experiments the cryptand exhibited high avidity towards Rb+ and Cs+, when compared with the corresponding model compound. A computational study of a series of cage-functionalized cryptands and their alkali metal-complexes was performed. The X-ray crystal structure of a K+-complexed bis-cage-annulated 20-crown-6 was obtained. The associated picrate anion was found to be intimately involved in stabilization of the host-guest complex. The interaction energy between the host-guest complex and picrate anion has been calculated, and the energy thereby obtained has been corrected for basis set superposition error.
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Kinetic studies and computational modeling of atomic chlorine reactions in the gas phase.

Kinetic studies and computational modeling of atomic chlorine reactions in the gas phase.

Date: August 2009
Creator: Alecu, Ionut M.
Description: The gas phase reactions of atomic chlorine with hydrogen sulfide, ammonia, benzene, and ethylene are investigated using the laser flash photolysis / resonance fluorescence experimental technique. In addition, the kinetics of the reverse processes for the latter two elementary reactions are also studied experimentally. The absolute rate constants for these processes are measured over a wide range of conditions, and the results offer new accurate information about the reactivity and thermochemistry of these systems. The temperature dependences of these reactions are interpreted via the Arrhenius equation, which yields significantly negative activation energies for the reaction of the chlorine atom and hydrogen sulfide as well as for that between the phenyl radical and hydrogen chloride. Positive activation energies which are smaller than the overall endothermicity are measured for the reactions between atomic chlorine with ammonia and ethylene, which suggests that the reverse processes for these reactions also possess negative activation energies. The enthalpies of formation of the phenyl and β-chlorovinyl are assessed via the third-law method. The stability and reactivity of each reaction system is further rationalized based on potential energy surfaces, computed with high-level ab initio quantum mechanical methods and refined through the inclusion of effects which arise from the ...
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Thermodynamic and Structural Studies of Layered Double Hydroxides

Thermodynamic and Structural Studies of Layered Double Hydroxides

Date: May 1998
Creator: Boclair, Joseph W. (Joseph Walter)
Description: The preparation of layered double hydroxides via titration with sodium hydroxide was thoroughly investigated for a number of M(II)/M(III) combinations. These titration curves were examined and used to calculate nominal solubility product constants and other thermodynamic quantities for the various LDH chloride systems.
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Kinetic Studies of Hydroxyl and Hydrogen Atom Reactions

Kinetic Studies of Hydroxyl and Hydrogen Atom Reactions

Date: May 2002
Creator: Hu, Xiaohua
Description: Gas phase kinetics of the reactions involving hydroxyl radical and hydrogen atom were studied using experimental and ab initio theoretical techniques. The rate constant for the H + H2S reaction has been measured from 298 to 598 K by the laser photolysis/resonance fluorescence (LP-RF) technique. The transition state theory (TST) analysis coupled with the measurements support the suggestion that the reaction shows significant curvature in the Arrhenius plot. The LP-RF technique was also used to measure the rate constant of the H + CH3Br reaction over the temperature range 400-813 K. TST and density functional theory (DFT) calculations show that the dominant reaction channel is Br-abstraction. The reaction H + CF2=CF-CF=CF2 was first studied by flash photolysis/resonance fluorescence (FP-RF) method. The experiments of this work revealed distinctly non-Arrhenius behavior, which was interpreted in terms of a change in mechanism. DFT calculations suggest that the adduct is CF2H-CF•-CF=CF2. At lower temperatures a mixture of this molecule and CF2•-CFH-CF=CF2 is likely. The theoretical calculations show that H atom migrates in the fluoroethyl radicals through a bridging intermediate, and the barrier height for this process is lower in the less fluorinated ethyl radical. High level computations were also employed in studies of the ...
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Layered Double Hydroxides: Morphology, Interlayer Anion, and the Origins of Life

Layered Double Hydroxides: Morphology, Interlayer Anion, and the Origins of Life

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: December 2002
Creator: Halcom-Yarberry, Faith Marie
Description: The preparation of layered double hydroxides via co-precipitation of a divalent/trivalent metal solution against a base results in 1 mm LDH particles with a disorganized metal lattice. Research was performed to address these morphological issues using techniques such as Ostwald ripening and precipitation via aluminate. Another interesting issue in layered double hydroxide materials is the uptake and orientation of anions into the interlayer. Questions about iron cyanide interlayer anions have been posed. Fourier transform infared spectroscopy and powder x-ray diffraction have been used to investigate these topics. It was found that factors such as orientation, anion charge, and anion structure depended on the divalent/trivalent metal ratio of the hydroxide layer and reactivity time. The cyanide self-addition reaction is an important reaction of classical prebiotic chemistry. This reaction has been shown to give rise to amino acids, purines and pyrimidines. At cyanide concentrations similar to that expected on the early earth, hydrolysis to formamide rather than self-addition occurs. One theory to alleviate this side reaction is the use of minerals or clays that are thought to concentrate and catalyze prebiotics of interest. Layered double hydroxides have been studied as a catalyst for this reaction.
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