Flight tests of a delta-wing vertically rising airplane model powered by a ducted fan

Flight tests of a delta-wing vertically rising airplane model powered by a ducted fan

Date: April 6, 1955
Creator: Lovell, Powell M , Jr
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The effect of wind bending deflection on the rolling moment due to sideslip

The effect of wind bending deflection on the rolling moment due to sideslip

Date: February 1, 1948
Creator: Lovell, Powell M , Jr
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Flight Tests of a 0.13-Scale Model of the Convair XFY-1 Vertically Rising Airplane in a Setup Simulating that Proposed for Captive-Flight Tests in a Hangar, TED No. NACA DE 368

Flight Tests of a 0.13-Scale Model of the Convair XFY-1 Vertically Rising Airplane in a Setup Simulating that Proposed for Captive-Flight Tests in a Hangar, TED No. NACA DE 368

Date: January 1, 1953
Creator: Lovell, Powell M., Jr.
Description: An experimental investigation has been conducted to determine the dynamic stability and control characteristics of a 0.13-scale free-flight model of the Convair XFY-1 airplane in test setups representing the setup proposed for use in the first flight tests of the full-scale airplane in the Moffett Field airship hangar. The investigation was conducted in two parts: first, tests with the model flying freely in an enclosure simulating the hangar, and second, tests with the model partially restrained by an overhead line attached to the propeller spinner and ground lines attached to the wing and tail tips. The results of the tests indicated that the airplane can be flown without difficulty in the Moffett Field airship hangar if it does not approach too close to the hangar walls. If it does approach too close to the walls, the recirculation of the propeller slipstream might cause sudden trim changes which would make smooth flight difficult for the pilot to accomplish. It appeared that the tethering system proposed by Convair could provide generally satisfactory restraint of large-amplitude motions caused by control failure or pilot error without interfering with normal flying or causing any serious instability or violent jerking motions as the tethering lines restrained ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Flight Tests of a 0.13-Scale Model of the Convair XFY-1 Vertically Rising Airplane with the Lower Vertical Tail Removed, TED No.DE 368

Flight Tests of a 0.13-Scale Model of the Convair XFY-1 Vertically Rising Airplane with the Lower Vertical Tail Removed, TED No.DE 368

Date: May 12, 1954
Creator: Lovell, Powell M., Jr.
Description: An experimental investigation has been conducted to determine the dynamic stability and control characteristics in hovering and transition flight of a 0.13-scale flying model of the Convair XFY-1 vertically rising airplane with the lower vertical tail removed. The purpose of the tests was to obtain a general indication of the behavior of a vertically rising airplane of the same general type as the XFY-1 but without a lower vertical tail in order to simplify power-off belly landings in an emergency. The model was flown satisfactorily in hovering flight and in the transition from hovering to normal unstalled forward flight (angle of attack approximately 30deg). From an angle of attack of about 30 down to the lowest angle of attack covered in the flight tests (approximately 15deg) the model became progressively more difficult to control. These control difficulties were attributed partly to a lightly damped Dutch roll oscillation and partly to the fact that the control deflections required for hovering and transition flight were too great for smooth flight at high speeds. In the low-angle-of-attack range not covered in the flight tests, force tests have indicated very low static directional stability which would probably result in poor flight characteristics. It appears, ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Hovering-flight tests of a model of a transport vertical-take-off airplane with tilting wing and propellers

Hovering-flight tests of a model of a transport vertical-take-off airplane with tilting wing and propellers

Date: March 1, 1956
Creator: Lovell, Powell M , Jr & Parlett, Lysle P
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Transition-flight tests of a model of a low-wing transport vertical-take-off airplane with tilting wing and propellers

Transition-flight tests of a model of a low-wing transport vertical-take-off airplane with tilting wing and propellers

Date: September 1, 1956
Creator: Lovell, Powell M , Jr & Parlett, Lysle P
Description: An investigation of the stability and control of a low-wing four-engine transport vertical-take-off airplane during the transition from hovering to normal forward flight has been conducted with a remotely controlled free-flight model. The model had four propellers distributed along the wing with the thrust axes in the wing-chord plane. The wing could be rotated to 90 degrees incidence so that the propeller thrust axes were vertical for hovering flight.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Flight tests of a model of a high-wing transport vertical-take-off airplane with tilting wing and propellers and with jet controls at the rear of the fuselage for pitch and yaw control

Flight tests of a model of a high-wing transport vertical-take-off airplane with tilting wing and propellers and with jet controls at the rear of the fuselage for pitch and yaw control

Date: March 1, 1957
Creator: Lovell, Powell M , Jr & Parlett, Lysle P
Description: An investigation of the stability and control of a high-wing transport vertical-take-off airplane with four engines during constant-altitude transitions from hovering to normal forward flight was conducted with a remotely controlled free-flight model. The model had four propellers distributed along the wing with the thrust axes in the wing chord plane. The wing could be rotated to 90 degrees incidence so that the propeller thrust axes were vertical for hovering flight. An air jet at the rear of the fuselage provided pitch and yaw control for hovering and low-speed flight.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
A comparison of the lateral controllability with flap and plug ailerons on a sweptback-wing model

A comparison of the lateral controllability with flap and plug ailerons on a sweptback-wing model

Date: May 1, 1950
Creator: Lovell, Powell M , Jr & Stassi, Paul P
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Dynamic Stability and Control Characteristics of a Delta-Wing Vertically Rising Airplane Model in Take-Offs, Landings and Hovering Flight

Dynamic Stability and Control Characteristics of a Delta-Wing Vertically Rising Airplane Model in Take-Offs, Landings and Hovering Flight

Date: October 9, 1951
Creator: Lovell, Powell M.; Bates, William R. & Smith, Charles C., Jr.
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Vertical Descent and Landing Tests of a 0.13-Scale Model of the Convair XFY-1 Vertically Rising Airplane in Still Air, TED No. NACA DE 368

Vertical Descent and Landing Tests of a 0.13-Scale Model of the Convair XFY-1 Vertically Rising Airplane in Still Air, TED No. NACA DE 368

Date: March 4, 1954
Creator: Smith, Charlee C., Jr. & Lovell, Powell M., Jr.
Description: An investigation is being conducted to determine the dynamic stability and control characteristics of a 0.13-scale flying model of Convair XFY-1 vertically rising airplane. This paper presents the results of flight and force tests to determine the stability and control characteristics of the model in vertical descent and landings in still air. The tests indicated that landings, including vertical descent from altitudes representing up to 400 feet for the full-scale airplane and at rates of descent up to 15 or 20 feet per second (full scale), can be performed satisfactorily. Sustained vertical descent in still air probably will be more difficult to perform because of large random trim changes that become greater as the descent velocity is increased. A slight steady head wind or cross wind might be sufficient to eliminate the random trim changes.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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