Managed Health Care: A Primer

Managed Health Care: A Primer

Date: September 30, 1997
Creator: Lee, Jason S
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
FINAL REPORT FOR INDEPENDENT CONFIRMATORY SURVEY SUMMARY AND RESULTS FOR THE HEMATITE DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT, FESTUS, MISSOURI

FINAL REPORT FOR INDEPENDENT CONFIRMATORY SURVEY SUMMARY AND RESULTS FOR THE HEMATITE DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT, FESTUS, MISSOURI

Date: September 21, 2012
Creator: Bailey, Erika N. & Lee, Jason D.
Description: ORAU conducted confirmatory surveys of the Hematite site during the period of June 12 through June 13, 2012. The survey activities included in-process inspections, document review, walkover surveys, sampling activities, and laboratory analysis of split samples. WEC was forthcoming with information relating to practices, procedures, and surface scan results. Scans performed by the WEC technician were extremely thorough and methodical. The WEC and ORAU technicians identified the same areas of elevated activity with comparable detector responses. WEC sampling of re-use soils, waste soils, sediments, and groundwater were conducted under ORAU observation. The sampling efforts observed by ORAU were performed in accordance with site-specific procedures and in a manner sufficient to provide quality supporting data. Three observations were made during groundwater sampling activities. First, the water level indicator was re-used without submitting rinse blank. Second, bubbles created during tubing extraction could indicate the presence of volatilized organic compounds. Third, samplers did not use a photo ionization detector prior to sample collection to indicate the presence of volatile organic vapors. Results of split samples indicated a high level of comparability between the WEC and ORAU/ORISE radiological laboratories. Analytical practices and procedures appear to be sufficient in providing quality radiochemical data. All concentrations ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Enabling network-aware applications

Enabling network-aware applications

Date: August 1, 2001
Creator: Tierney, Brian L.; Gunter, Dan; Lee, Jason & Stouffer, Martin
Description: Many high performance distributed applications use only a small fraction of their available bandwidth. A common cause of this problem is not a flaw in the application design, but rather improperly tuned network settings. Proper tuning techniques, such as setting the correct TCP buffers and using parallel streams, are well known in the networking community, but outside the networking community they are infrequently applied. In this paper, we describe a service that makes the task of network tuning trivial for application developers and users. Widespread use of this service should virtually eliminate a common stumbling block for high performance distributed applications.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Using High-Speed WANs and Network Data Caches to Enable Remote and Distributed Visualization

Using High-Speed WANs and Network Data Caches to Enable Remote and Distributed Visualization

Date: April 18, 2000
Creator: Bethel, Wes; Lau, Stephen; Tierney, Brian; Lee, Jason & Gunter, Dan
Description: Visapult is a prototype application and framework for remote visualization of large scientific datasets. We approach the technical challenges of tera-scale visualization with a unique architecture that employs high speed WANs and network data caches for data staging and transmission. This architecture allows for the use of available cache and compute resources at arbitrary locations on the network. High data throughput rates and network utilization are achieved by parallelizing I/O at each stage in the application, and by pipe-lining the visualization process. On the desktop, the graphics interactivity is effectively decoupled from the latency inherent in network applications. We present a detailed performance analysis of the application, and improvements resulting from field-test analysis conducted as part of the DOE Combustion Corridor project.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Applied techniques for high bandwidth data transfers across wide area networks

Applied techniques for high bandwidth data transfers across wide area networks

Date: April 30, 2001
Creator: Lee, Jason; Gunter, Dan; Tierney, Brian; Allcock, Bill; Bester, Joe; Bresnahan, John et al.
Description: Large distributed systems such as Computational/Data Grids require large amounts of data to be co-located with the computing facilities for processing. Ensuring that the data is there in time for the computation in today's Internet is a massive problem. From our work developing a scalable distributed network cache, we have gained experience with techniques necessary to achieve high data throughput over high bandwidth Wide Area Networks (WAN). In this paper, we discuss several hardware and software design techniques and issues, and then describe their application to an implementation of an enhanced FTP protocol called GridFTP. We also describe results from two applications using these techniques, which were obtained at the Supercomputing 2000 conference.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Network aware distributed applications

Network aware distributed applications

Date: February 4, 2001
Creator: Agarwal, Deborah; Tierney, Brian L.; Gunter, Dan; Lee, Jason & Johnston, William
Description: Most distributed applications today manage to utilize only a small percentage of the needed and available network bandwidth. Often application developers are not aware of the potential bandwidth of the network, and therefore do not know what to expect. Even when application developers are aware of the specifications of the machines and network links, they have few resources that can help determine why the expected performance was not achieved. What is needed is a ubiquitous and easy-to-use service that provides reliable, accurate, secure, and timely estimates of dynamic network properties. This service will help advise applications on how to make use of the network's increasing bandwidth and capabilities for traffic shaping and engineering. When fully implemented, this service will make building currently unrealizable levels of network awareness into distributed applications a relatively mundane task. For example, a remote data visualization application could choose between sending a wireframe, a pre-rendered image, or a 3-D representation, based on forecasts of CPU availability and power, compression options, and available bandwidth. The same service will provide on-demand performance information so that applications can compare predicted with actual results, and allow detailed queries about the end-to-end path for application and network tuning and debugging.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department