Metaphoric Analysis of a Shipyard Union Dispute: Theory and Method in the Cultural Analysis of Collective Action

Metaphoric Analysis of a Shipyard Union Dispute: Theory and Method in the Cultural Analysis of Collective Action

Date: February 2009
Creator: Ignatow, Gabriel
Description: This book chapter discusses the metaphoric analysis of a shipyard union dispute and the theory and method in the cultural analysis of collective action. Rather than treating grievances and political opportunities, given, and exogenous to organized movement groups, cultural analysts of social movements have recently focused on cognitive and linguistic processes by which factors relevant to collective behavior are themselves interpreted collectively.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Arts and Sciences
[Review] Habits of the Heartland: Small-Town Life in Modern America

[Review] Habits of the Heartland: Small-Town Life in Modern America

Date: January 2011
Creator: Ignatow, Gabriel
Description: This article reviews the book "Habits of the Heartland: Small-Town Life in Modern America," by Lyn C. MacGregor published in 2010.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Public Affairs and Community Service
Inter-organizational digital divide: Civic groups' media strategies in the Trinity River Corridor Project

Inter-organizational digital divide: Civic groups' media strategies in the Trinity River Corridor Project

Date: November 7, 2011
Creator: Ignatow, Gabriel & Schuett, Jessica Lynn
Description: Article on inter-organizational digital divides and civic groups' media strategies in the Trinity River Corridor Project.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Public Affairs and Community Service
Public Libraries and Democratization in Three Developing Countries: Exploring the Role of Social Capital

Public Libraries and Democratization in Three Developing Countries: Exploring the Role of Social Capital

Date: March 2012
Creator: Ignatow, Gabriel; Webb, Sarah M.; Poulin, Michelle; Parajuli, Ramesh; Fleming, Peter; Batra, Shika et al.
Description: This article explores the role of social capital. The authors develop a theoretical framework intended to facilitate systematic investigation of the contributions public libraries may make to democratization.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Public Affairs and Community Service