Doctoral Lecture Recital: 2010-06-07 - Steven Hunter, trombone

Doctoral Lecture Recital: 2010-06-07 - Steven Hunter, trombone

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: June 7, 2010
Creator: Hunter, Steven
Description: Recital presented at the UNT College of Music Recital Hall in partial fulfillment of the Doctor of Musical Arts (DMA) degree.
Contributing Partner: UNT Music Library
Doctoral Recital: 2009-03-09 - Steven Hunter, trombone

Doctoral Recital: 2009-03-09 - Steven Hunter, trombone

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: March 9, 2009
Creator: Hunter, Steven
Description: Recital presented at the UNT College of Music Recital Hall in partial fulfillment of the Doctor of Musical Arts (DMA) degree.
Contributing Partner: UNT Music Library
Doctoral Recital: 2008-04-10 - Steven Hunter, trombone

Doctoral Recital: 2008-04-10 - Steven Hunter, trombone

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: April 10, 2008
Creator: Hunter, Steven
Description: Recital presented at the UNT College of Music Recital Hall in partial fulfillment of the Doctor of Musical Arts (DMA) degree.
Contributing Partner: UNT Music Library
The Instrumental Music of Ida Gotkovsky: Finding Intertextual Meaning

The Instrumental Music of Ida Gotkovsky: Finding Intertextual Meaning

Date: August 2010
Creator: Hunter, Steven K.
Description: Ida Gotkovsky, a student of Olivier Messiaen and Nadia Boulanger, composed for nearly every instrument, voice, and ensemble. Although Gotkovsky's Concerto for Trombone is a monumental work for the trombone it is rarely performed and recordings are scarce. There is a general lack of scholarly attention to the music of Ida Gotkovsky, however, the technical and aesthetic quality of her music merits further examination. Previous studies of Gotkovsky's music focused on the analysis of individual compositions. However, much more can be learned by examining a work within the context of her general compositional output. Gotkovsky's compositional style includes extensive musical self-borrowing. The goal of this project is to demonstrate melodic and textural similarities and differences within her music to inform performance practice and to establish interest in her music. The context in which Gotkovsky reuses her music is significant and can provide additional musical insight. An informed awareness of her extensive use of self-quotation familiarizes the performer with her compositional language in a variety of musical settings. Such familiarity with her musical style leads to an improved and artistically educated performance.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries