Battle for the Punchbowl: The U. S. 1st Marine Division 1951 Fall Offensive of the Korean War

Battle for the Punchbowl: The U. S. 1st Marine Division 1951 Fall Offensive of the Korean War

Date: August 2007
Creator: Montandon, Joshua W.
Description: This study is an operational and tactical study of a battle fought by the U. S. 1st Marine Division near "the Punchbowl," an extinct volcano of military value in the Taebaek Mountains of Korea, from late August through mid September 1951. That engagement was to be the last 1st Marine Division offensive of the Korean War. This battle, for Yoke and Kanmubong Ridges, has received little coverage from historians. That it is all but forgotten is surprising, since it was one of the hardest fought for United States Marines in the war. The casualties were high, and Americans did not understand why so many had to die for a war that seemed to already be set to conclude by negotiations. This study tells the story of that battle more completely than ever before, and assesses its significance to the course of the Korean War.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Oral History Interview with Marvin Dunn, October 11, 2007

Oral History Interview with Marvin Dunn, October 11, 2007

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: October 11, 2007
Creator: Montandon, Josh & Dunn, Marvin
Description: Interview with Korean War veteran Marvin Dunn as part of the Tarrant County War Veterans Oral History Project. The interview includes Dunn's personal experiences about boot camp and training, combat in Korea, combat at Hill 749 and Hill 884, and of being a teacher, principal, and administrator in Dallas ISD. Additionally, Dunn discusses his decision to drop out of college to join the U.S. Marine Corps, his assignment to combat unit, the battlefield injury at "the Punchbowl," that resulted in his leg amputation, the following recuperation, his opinions regarding enemy soldiers and what the U.S. accomplished in the war, civilian opinions of the war, struggling with post-traumatic stress disorder, returning to college and graduate school, and his involvement with Korean War Veterans Organization. The interview also includes an appendix with photographs.
Contributing Partner: UNT Oral History Program