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Disclosure of Children's Positive Serostatus to Family and Nonfamily Members: Informal Caregivers in Togo, West Africa

Disclosure of Children's Positive Serostatus to Family and Nonfamily Members: Informal Caregivers in Togo, West Africa

Date: April 14, 2011
Creator: Moore, Ami R. & Williamson, David Allen
Description: Article on the disclosure of children's positive serostatus to family and nonfamily members.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Public Affairs and Community Service
Perceptions of Control and Social Support: Correlates of HIV-Related Self-Efficacy

Perceptions of Control and Social Support: Correlates of HIV-Related Self-Efficacy

Date: May 2011
Creator: Lopez, Eliot Jay
Description: This study examines the extent to which locus of control and social support are linked to self-efficacy with regard to disease management in HIV-positive adults. Perceived ability to effectively manage illness was measured with the Self-Efficacy for Managing Chronic Disease Scale. Scores from the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support and the Multidimensional Locus of Control Scale were used as predictors. The gender-balanced sample (N = 69) of HIV+ adults was primarily African-American (65.3%) and European American (30.5%), with a mean age of 47 years (SD = 8.37). Correlational analyses suggested significant positive relationships between self-efficacy, social support, and locus of control due to powerful others. A regression analysis found that the model accounted for 23% of the variance in self-efficacy (adj. R-squared =.23, F (5, 63) = 4.81, p < .01), with social support (&#946; = .37, t = 3.28, p < .01) and locus of control (&#946; = .25, t = 2.26, p < .05) both significant predictors. Results suggest that social support and locus of control contribute to the belief that HIV can be managed. Interestingly, an external locus of control contributed to this belief, perhaps due to the perception of a physician, religious icon, or partner ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Minority Hiv Rates, Inequality, and the Politics of Aids Funding

Minority Hiv Rates, Inequality, and the Politics of Aids Funding

Date: August 2012
Creator: Miles, Thomas
Description: Since the 1990s, the HIV/AIDS epidemic has increasingly impacted minority groups in the United States, particularly African Americans. Why is this happening? Comparative studies of developing nations have convincingly established a relationship between concentrated poverty, ethnic boundaries, and lack of effective governmental response as contributing to high levels of infection in those countries. To date, however, no study has sought to apply these insights to the American context. This dissertation endeavors to show that, first, marginalization of U.S. sub-groups most at risk of infection is largely a product of poor health outcomes associated with concentrated urban poverty and economic stratification. Second, this sub-group marginalization is exacerbated by the politics of retrenchment which increasingly privatizes risks onto individuals, states, and non-governmental providers. The net result of these changes is a U.S. health care system too fractured to recognize and respond to changes in HIV/AIDS demographics.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Body Dissatisfaction, Disordered Eating Behaviors and Body Image Quality of Life in African American Women with Hiv

Body Dissatisfaction, Disordered Eating Behaviors and Body Image Quality of Life in African American Women with Hiv

Date: December 2012
Creator: Hammon, Sarah A.
Description: The purpose of the current study was to further our understanding of the subjective experience of middle-age African American women who are HIV+ and on highly active antiretroviral therapy, particularly how self-reported lipodystrophy (LD), levels of body dissatisfaction, body image quality of life, and engagement in disordered eating behaviors are related. Multiple regression, MANOVA, MANCOVA, ANOVA, and chi-square were utilized to test hypotheses. Results revealed that HIV+ and HIV- women did not differ significantly on their levels of body dissatisfaction or drive for thinness. When HIV+ women were examined in more detail a pattern emerged: women who self-reported fat hypertrophy had significantly higher levels of body dissatisfaction, bingeing, but not purging, and dietary restriction and fear of weight gain compared to women who did not self-report LD. About 75% of the sample was overweight or obese, and when BMI was controlled for, these differences persisted for body dissatisfaction and disordered eating behaviors for fat hypertrophy, but not fat atrophy. Overall, the findings indicate that the type of LD, specifically hypertrophy, is more related to body dissatisfaction and disordered eating behaviors, than LD in general. Clinical implications and limitations of these findings are discussed.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
HIV in Asia: History, Challenges, and Solutions

HIV in Asia: History, Challenges, and Solutions

Date: December 1, 2011
Creator: Chng, Chwee-Lye
Description: This presentation is part of the faculty lecture series UNT Speaks Out on HIV/AIDS. This presentation discusses HIV in Asia, including its history, challenges, and solutions.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Education
Current Behavioral and Psychosocial Interventions for HIV/AIDS

Current Behavioral and Psychosocial Interventions for HIV/AIDS

Date: December 1, 2011
Creator: Vosvick, Mark A.
Description: This presentation is part of the faculty lecture series UNT Speaks Out on AIDS. This presentation discusses recent directions in psychosocial research on HIV/AIDS in the United States.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Arts and Sciences
World AIDS Day

World AIDS Day

Date: December 1, 2011
Creator: Mondragon-Becker, Antonio
Description: This poster introduces the faculty lecture series UNT Speaks Out on HIV/AIDS. This series features Dr. Mark Vosvick, associate professor of psychology, Dr. Chwee-Lye Chng, regents professor of kinesiology, health promotion, and recreational studies, Dr. Joseph R. Oppong, professor of geography, and Dr. Ami R. Moore, associate professor of sociology.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
HIV and AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa

HIV and AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa

Date: December 1, 2011
Creator: Moore, Ami R.
Description: This presentation is part of the faculty lecture series UNT Speaks Out on HIV/AIDS. This presentation discusses HIV and AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Public Affairs and Community Service
Geographic Distribution of HIV/AIDS in Texas

Geographic Distribution of HIV/AIDS in Texas

Date: December 1, 2011
Creator: Oppong, Joseph R.
Description: This presentation is part of the faculty lecture series UNT Speaks Out on HIV/AIDS. This presentation discusses the geographic distribution of HIV/AIDS in Texas and the associated factors.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Arts and Sciences
An Investigation of the Relationship between HIV and Prison Facilities in Texas: The Geographic Variation and Vulnerable Neighborhood Characteristics

An Investigation of the Relationship between HIV and Prison Facilities in Texas: The Geographic Variation and Vulnerable Neighborhood Characteristics

Date: August 2011
Creator: Kutch, Libbey
Description: Previous research suggests that prisons may be fueling the spread of HIV infection in the general population. In 2005, the HIV rate was more than 2.5 times higher in US prison populations. Environmental factors in prisons such as illicit drug use and unprotected sexual activities can be conducive for HIV transmission. Because the vast majority of prison inmates are incarcerated for less than three years, transmission of HIV between prison inmates and members of the general population may occur at a high rate. The environment in which an individual lives and the entities that comprise it affect the health of that person. Thus the location of prisons within communities, as well as socio-demographic characteristics may influence the geography of HIV infection. HIV surveillance data, obtained from the Texas Department of State Health Services, were used to investigate the relationship between the location of prison units in Texas and HIV infection rates in the surrounding zip codes. The results suggest that HIV prevalence rates are higher among geographic areas in close proximity to a prison unit. With continued behavioral risks and low treatment adherence rates among individuals infected with HIV, there is a possibility of increased HIV prevalence. Vulnerable places, locations ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Effect of Resistance Training on Cytokines in Hiv+ Men with Chemical Dependence

Effect of Resistance Training on Cytokines in Hiv+ Men with Chemical Dependence

Date: May 2012
Creator: Curtis, John Harper
Description: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and substance abuse (drug and/or alcohol) independently impair the immune system; importantly, the combination of HIV infection and substance abuse might produce more than an additive effect on this system. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-?) and Interferon gamma (IFN?) are pro-inflammatory cytokines involved in differentiation of Th0 cells into Th1 cells. Interleukin 4 (IL-4) and Interleukin 10 (IL-10) are anti-inflammatory cytokine involved in differentiation of Th0 cells to Th2 cells. Unbalanced Th1 and Th2 cells can lead to immune suppression. Thus, changes in these cytokines could have important implications for people infected with HIV (HIV+). Resistance training can counteract muscle wasting, improve strength, and improve muscle mass. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of resistance training on resting concentrations of circulating TNF-?, IFN-?, IL-4, and IL-10. Sixteen men (42 ± 11 years, 180.4 ± 9.1 cm, 89.2 ± 20.7 kg) infected with HIV and enrolled in an intensive 60-day in-patient substance addiction/abuse treatment program were recruited shortly after admission to the treatment facility. Participants were assigned to one of two groups using randomization: supervised resistance exercise 3 times per week using a progressive and non-linear periodized program (Exercise) or no exercise training (Non-Exercise) ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Effect of Age on Likelihood to Test for Hiv

Effect of Age on Likelihood to Test for Hiv

Date: May 2012
Creator: Dreyer, Katherine
Description: HIV/AIDS can affect individuals of any age. Efforts to educate those considered to be most at-risk, based on the age at which the most individuals are infected, are ongoing and public. Less work and mainstream education outreach, however, is being directed at an older population, who can be more likely to contract HIV, is more susceptible to the effects of HIV, and more likely to develop AIDS, than younger persons. Guided by the Health Belief Model theory, research was conducted to determine what, if any, relationship existed between age of an individual and the possibility that an HIV test will be sought. Factors of gender, education, ethnicity and marital status were included in analyses. the research indicated that as age increased, likelihood for getting an HIV test decreased. Overall, most individuals had not been tested for HIV. the implications of an aged and aging population with HIV include a need for coordinated service delivery, increased education and outreach.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Forgiveness and Loneliness: Stress and Anxiety’s Correlates in a Student and Clinical Hiv-positive Sample

Forgiveness and Loneliness: Stress and Anxiety’s Correlates in a Student and Clinical Hiv-positive Sample

Date: May 2012
Creator: Hill, Jonathan
Description: Persistent periods of stress exacerbate the symptoms of chronic illness. Additionally, loneliness is strongly correlated with stress and both state and trait anxiety. Prolonged periods of loneliness are linked with depression in both clinical and student samples. Forgiveness, a cognitive, emotional, and behavioral response to interpersonal or intrapersonal conflict, is important to social harmony. in this study I describe three studies that examine forgiveness, loneliness, stress, and anxiety in two populations, a student population and an HIV+ clinical population. Study 1 examined how the variables of forgiveness and loneliness are associated with perceived stress in a student sample of undergraduate students. Study 2 examined the same variables (forgiveness, loneliness, and perceived stress) in an HIV-positive clinical population. Finally, study 3 extends the model and examines the relationship of forgiveness and loneliness to variables related to stress, state and trait anxiety. for studies 2 and 3, 63 HIV-positive individuals participated in the cross-sectional correlational study. the data was analyzed in each study using hierarchical linear regression analysis. We also tested the models for the three studies to determine if forgiveness moderates the relationship between loneliness and state and trait anxiety. in study 1, using hierarchical linear regression analyses, I found that ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Positive and Negative Affect: Differential Impact of Optimism, Pessimism, and Coping in People Living with HIV/AIDS

Positive and Negative Affect: Differential Impact of Optimism, Pessimism, and Coping in People Living with HIV/AIDS

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: August 2005
Creator: Ranucci, Melissa B.
Description: People living with HIV/AIDS (PLH) struggle with depression. Recent research suggests that depression affects medical regimen adherence, disease progression, and risky sexual behaviors. The present study uses a stress and coping theory viewing HIV-related stigma and physical symptoms as stressors in PLH. Results suggest whereas symptoms and stigma consistently predict negative affect, positive affect, and overall depression, the role of optimism, pessimism, active coping, denial, and behavioral disengagement is not as clear. Pessimism and denial predict negative affect and depression. Optimism and behavioral disengagement predict depression and positive affect. Active coping only predicts positive affect. Focusing on positive and negative affect as distinct components that contribute to overall depression may help researchers develop interventions more effectively.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
[AIDS Resource Center PSA]

[AIDS Resource Center PSA]

Date: [1983..1988]
Creator: AIDS Resource Center
Description: Flyer for the AIDS Resource Center advertising services that the organization provides as part of its community outreach and educational programming.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
[Letter to the Editor from Ann Brown - 1983]

[Letter to the Editor from Ann Brown - 1983]

Date: 1983
Creator: Brown, Ann
Description: Letter from Ann Brown to members of the Dallas Gay Alliance concerning issues during 1983 centering around the AIDS epidemic and the Texas Freedom Festival.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
Psychosocial and Spiritual Factors Affecting Persons Living with HIV and AIDS

Psychosocial and Spiritual Factors Affecting Persons Living with HIV and AIDS

Date: August 1993
Creator: Elkins, Tamara L. (Tamara Lynn)
Description: The purposes of this study were (a) to examine whether social support decreases as the person with HIV disease progresses from asymptomatic HIV to symptomatic AIDS and (b) to examine the extent to which general well-being might be mediated through a religious and/or spiritual support system.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Preparedness to Counsel HIV-Positive Clients: a Survey of Practitioners

Preparedness to Counsel HIV-Positive Clients: a Survey of Practitioners

Date: December 1994
Creator: Rowe, Christina J. (Christina Jo)
Description: This purpose of this study was to investigate and examine the attitudes of therapists who treat HIV-positive (HIV+) clients. Specifically, therapists' perceptions of their own preparedness in dealing with specific issues and emotions of HIV+ clients were examined. Also, therapists' evaluation of their own efficacy of specific therapeutic approaches with HIV+ clients was examined. These therapists' perceptions and evaluations of all their clients in general were compared to their HIV+ clients. Comparisons were also made within the two groups.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
HIV and Duty to Protect: a Survey of Licensed Professional Counselors and Physicians

HIV and Duty to Protect: a Survey of Licensed Professional Counselors and Physicians

Date: May 1995
Creator: Johnson, Laura K. (Laura Kimberly)
Description: This study was designed to investigate what course of action therapists and physicians report they would take in reconciling their conflicting duties to maintain confidentiality and protect third parties from harm in HIV-related situations. The physicians surveyed were licensed to practice medicine in Texas and board certified in Internal Medicine. The therapists surveyed were licensed professional counselors in Texas and members of one of three selected divisions within the Texas Counseling Association. A survey instrument developed by the researcher was mailed to 200 subjects randomly selected from each group.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Lipodystrophy, Body Image and Depression in Hiv Positive Black Women

Lipodystrophy, Body Image and Depression in Hiv Positive Black Women

Date: May 2014
Creator: Carr, Jarice N.
Description: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seropositive men on highly active antiretroviral therapy treatment (HAART) who experience lipodystrophy syndrome (LD), a side effect of HAART, rate themselves as more depressed than those who did not experience LD(Crane et al., 2008). Furthermore, men who rated their LD symptoms as more severe also scored higher on depression measures than men who experienced less severe symptoms. It is unknown these findings can be generalized to other groups of HIV positive individuals. The current study seeks to fill this gap in the literature by exploring the associations between LD, body image, and depressive symptoms in an archival sample of HIV positive Black women. This study aims to describe the body changes associated with HAART in a Black female sample and explore the relationships between LD, body image, depression, and quality of life. Findings supported past research indicating a correlation between depression and poor body image but did not indicate that body image quality of life moderated the relationship between perceived body changes and depression. Results expanded on the literature by indicating that perceived body changes may be more distressing to Black women with HIV than objective changes. Lastly, findings suggested that Black women may have inaccurate ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Perceived Stress as a Mediator Between Self-Efficacy and Depression in HIV positive Individuals

Perceived Stress as a Mediator Between Self-Efficacy and Depression in HIV positive Individuals

Date: April 14, 2011
Creator: Parks, Eddie; Vosvick, Mark A. & Chng, Chwee-Lye
Description: Presentation for the 2011 University Scholars Day at the University of North Texas discussing research on perceived stress as a mediator between self-efficacy and depression in human immunodeficiency virus positive (HIV+) individuals.
Contributing Partner: UNT Honors College
HIV/AIDS Management and Control in sub-Saharan Africa

HIV/AIDS Management and Control in sub-Saharan Africa

Date: April 15, 2010
Creator: Echun, Akello & Spinks, Todd
Description: Paper on HIV/AIDS management and control in sub-Saharan Africa.
Contributing Partner: UNT Honors College
The roles of stress, self-distraction and behavioral disengagement: Perceived stigma in HIV-positive individuals

The roles of stress, self-distraction and behavioral disengagement: Perceived stigma in HIV-positive individuals

Date: April 14, 2011
Creator: Gomez, Brooke; Chng, Chwee-Lye & Vosvick, Mark A.
Description: Paper on denial, daily hassles, and health distress in HIV positive individuals. The authors' findings are important from a therapeutic perspective, and suggest that experiencing hassles and choosing to use denial as a coping strategy are associated with more health distress.
Contributing Partner: UNT Honors College
Anger Within an HIV+ Population in Relation to Stigma and Anxiety

Anger Within an HIV+ Population in Relation to Stigma and Anxiety

Date: April 14, 2011
Creator: Pierson, Mark & Vosvick, Mark A.
Description: Presentation for the 2011 University Scholars Day at the University of North Texas discussing research on anger within a human immunodeficiency virus positive (HIV+) population in relation to stigma and anxiety.
Contributing Partner: UNT Honors College
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