Interagency Contracting: An Overview of Federal Procurement and Appropriations Law

Interagency Contracting: An Overview of Federal Procurement and Appropriations Law

Date: October 1, 2010
Creator: Manuel, Kate M. & Yeh, Brian T.
Description: "Interagency contracting" is the term used to describe several procurement relationships between government agencies. This report provides an overview of the federal procurement and appropriations laws governing interagency contracting. It defines key terms used in discussing interagency contracting; surveys the various interagency contracting vehicles; and describes recently enacted and proposed amendments to the laws governing interagency contracting.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Overview of the Federal Procurement Process and Resources

Overview of the Federal Procurement Process and Resources

Date: February 23, 2011
Creator: Halchin, L. Elaine
Description: he federal government's basic procurement or acquisition process involves an agency identifying the goods and services it needs (also known as the agency's "requirements"), determining the most appropriate method for purchasing these items, and carrying out the acquisition. Although this process is simple in theory, any given procurement can be complex, involving a multitude of decisions and actions. This report describes the most common elements of the federal procurement process and resources that may be used in that process.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Inherently Governmental Functions and Other Work Reserved for Performance by Federal Government Employees: The Obama Administration's Proposed Policy Letter

Inherently Governmental Functions and Other Work Reserved for Performance by Federal Government Employees: The Obama Administration's Proposed Policy Letter

Date: October 1, 2010
Creator: Halchin, L. Elaine; Manuel, Kate M.; Reese, Shawn & Schwartz, Moshe
Description: On March 31, 2010, the Office of Federal Procurement Policy (OFPP) in the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issued a proposed policy letter on inherently governmental functions and other "work reserved for performance by federal government employees." While not final, the policy letter represents the Obama Administration's proposed guidance for agencies determining (1) whether particular functions are inherently governmental and (2) when functions closely associated with the performance of inherently governmental functions and critical functions should be performed by government personnel. The proposed policy letter raises several legal and policy issues of potential interest to Congress, given recently enacted and proposed legislation regarding inherently governmental functions and other limitations upon contracting out.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Contract Types: An Overview of the Legal Requirements and Issues

Contract Types: An Overview of the Legal Requirements and Issues

Date: October 1, 2010
Creator: Manuel, Kate M.
Description: This report provides an overview of the various contract types (e.g., fixed-price, cost-reimbursement) used in federal procurement and the legal requirements and issues pertaining to each. Current congressional and public interest in contract types is, in part, an outgrowth of the reported increase in the use of cost-reimbursement contracts during the George W. Bush Administration1 and the Obama Administration's proposal to reduce by at least 10% the funds obligated in FY2010 by "high risk-contracting authorities," such as cost-reimbursement, time-and-materials, and labor-hour contracts.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
V-22 Osprey Tilt-Rotor Aircraft: Background and Issues for Congress

V-22 Osprey Tilt-Rotor Aircraft: Background and Issues for Congress

Date: March 10, 2011
Creator: Gertler, Jeremiah
Description: This report discusses background information on the V-22 Osprey Tilt-Rotor Aircraft, as well as procurement issues for FY2012 and related oversight issues for Congress.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
GAO Bid Protests: An Overview of Timeframes and Procedures

GAO Bid Protests: An Overview of Timeframes and Procedures

Date: October 4, 2010
Creator: Manuel, Kate M. & Schwartz, Moshe
Description: Protests of high-profile awards and reports that the number of protests is increasing have recently prompted congressional and public interest in bid protests, particularly bid protests filed with the Government Accountability Office (GAO). This report is one of two providing Congress with background on the GAO bid-protest process. It provides an overview of the timeframes and procedures in a GAO bid protest, including several issues enumerated in the report's introduction.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Interagency Contracting: An Overview of Federal Procurement and Appropriations Law

Interagency Contracting: An Overview of Federal Procurement and Appropriations Law

Date: January 11, 2011
Creator: Manuel, Kate M. & Yeh, Brian T.
Description: Recently, federal agencies have increasingly resorted to interagency contracting, relying on the contracts or contracting operations of other agencies to acquire goods and services. This increased use of interagency contracting has made it a topic of interest to some members of Congress. This report provides an overview of the federal procurement and appropriations laws governing interagency contracting. It defines key terms used in discussing interagency contracting; surveys the various interagency contracting vehicles; and describes recently enacted and proposed amendments to the laws governing interagency contracting.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Competition in Federal Contracting: An Overview of the Legal Requirements

Competition in Federal Contracting: An Overview of the Legal Requirements

Date: January 10, 2011
Creator: Manuel, Kate M.
Description: This report describes the competition requirements currently governing the procurement activities of federal agencies. It addresses several issues, including what contracts are subject to competition requirements, what constitutes full and open competition for government contracts, and the circumstances permitting agencies to award contracts on the basis of other than full and open competition. It also briefly describes the benefits and drawbacks of competition, situates recent reform efforts within their historical context, and discusses how the policy debates surrounding competition in federal contracting can shape legislative responses.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
GAO Bid Protests: An Overview of Timeframes and Procedures

GAO Bid Protests: An Overview of Timeframes and Procedures

Date: March 15, 2011
Creator: Manuel, Kate M. & Schwartz, Moshe
Description: This report is one of two providing Congress with background on the Government Accountability Office (GAO) bid-protest process. It provides an overview of the timeframes and procedures in a GAO bid protest, including several issues enumerated in the report's introduction.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Domestic Content Legislation: The Buy American Act and Complementary Little Buy American Provisions

Domestic Content Legislation: The Buy American Act and Complementary Little Buy American Provisions

Date: April 25, 2012
Creator: Luckey, John R.
Description: Congress has broad authority to place conditions on the purchases made by the federal government or with federal dollars. One of many conditions that it has placed on direct government purchases is a requirement that they be produced in the United States. The most well-known of these requirements is the Buy American Act, which is the major domestic preference statute governing procurement by the federal government. This report summarizes (1) the Buy American Act, what it does and does not cover; (2) the Little Buy American Acts found in permanent law, emphasizing what they govern, major exceptions and why Congress felt them necessary in light of the requirements of the Buy American Act; and (3) the temporary Little Buy American provision found in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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