Factors related to cycling performance

Factors related to cycling performance

Date: May 2001
Creator: Naukkarinen, Vesa
Description: There were two primary goals in this investigation. The first goal was to determine if results from field tests (time-trials and a Conconi incremental test) are related to performance in mass-start long-distance bicycle races. The second goal was to investigate inter-relationships among field test variables. The testing variables measured were critical velocity (CV), Conconi anaerobic threshold (AT) velocity, 4mM AT velocity, fatigue index, peak blood lactate, and anaerobic work capacity. Participants were USCF 30 category 1 through 5 cyclists. Participants performed one 20.75 km and two 10.37 km all-out tests in the field. They also performed an incremental test. The tests were performed at one-week intervals. Results from the field tests were compared to recent mass-start racing performance. Results indicated that Conconi AT velocity was related to performance in a 161-km race. There was also a relationship between 4mM AT velocity and CV and between Conconi AT velocity and 4mM AT velocity. It was concluded that field tests might provide information about performance ability in mass-start long-distance bicycle races.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Use of repeated tests and rolling breath averages affects the precision of quantifying the VO2 response profile in moderate intensity cycling.

Use of repeated tests and rolling breath averages affects the precision of quantifying the VO2 response profile in moderate intensity cycling.

Date: August 2006
Creator: Pedini, Daniela Marie
Description: The purpose of this study was to determine whether working in the field of deaf education, as opposed to general education, results in a higher level of technology integration. A secondary goal was to determine if deaf educators who are deaf integrate technology at a higher level than their hearing counterparts. The instrument chosen for this study was the LoTi Technology Use Profile, a tool used to explore the role of technology in the classroom. A total of 92 participates were included in the study of which 48 were regular educators and 44 were deaf educators. The participants were selected from a population pool whereby teachers were presumably pre-disposed to using technology based upon their attendance at a technology training session in the form of a conference or a class. Deaf educators as a whole did not perform as well as general educators on the LoTi scales. Given the fact that the technology-minded general educators who comprised the sample population of this study scored exceptionally high on the LoTi scales, further research is needed to ensure comparability between the two groups. The findings of the current study do suggest, though, that deaf educators who are deaf have the potential to ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
VO2 response profile in heavy intensity cycling after heavy intensity arm or leg exercise.

VO2 response profile in heavy intensity cycling after heavy intensity arm or leg exercise.

Date: December 2006
Creator: Ptak, April Louise
Description: The elevated CO2 levels, elevated temperature, and lower blood pH that may occur during exercise should enhance O2 delivery to the exercising muscles. It was hypothesized that performance of prior exercise (PE) would result in a faster VO2 response, as well as a reduced slow component contribution, in subsequent exercise bouts. Five women (21 ± 1 yr) and 10 men (23 ± 2 yr) performed nine 6-min bouts of heavy intensity cycle ergometer exercise (i.e., above the ventilatory threshold, individually determined by an incremental test). Three bouts were performed without prior heavy exercise (noPE), three were performed 6 min after a 6-min bout of heavy intensity arm cranking (PEA), and three were performed 6 min after a 6-min bout of heavy intensity cycle ergometer exercise (PEL). Breath-by-breath VO2 data from each of the three sets of three tests were combined and fitted to a two-component model, which ignores the cardiodynamic phase. The primary and slow component amplitudes were truncated to reflect actual increases in VO2 in each phase. The effects of PE on the time constant of the primary component were inconsistent. As hypothesized, the amplitude of the slow component was reduced by PE (noPE vs PEA vs. PEL: 25% ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Relationship Among Gender, Gender Role Attitudes, and the Anticipated Commitment to Career, Marriage, Family, and Housework

The Relationship Among Gender, Gender Role Attitudes, and the Anticipated Commitment to Career, Marriage, Family, and Housework

Date: August 2002
Creator: Hunter, Kate
Description: The relationships between gender, gender role attitudes, and participants' anticipation of future life roles (career, marriage, family, and homecare) were examined. Participants consisted of 297 single college students between the ages of 17-29 years (M = 20). Females reported significantly (p< .01) more egalitarian gender role attitudes than males. Significant results were found for the relationship between gender and anticipated life roles (p< .01) as well as between gender role attitudes and anticipated life roles (career role value, r = .14 and marital role value, r = - .18). The study findings suggest a possible gender conflict for females with more egalitarian gender role attitudes and behavior intentions and their male counterparts.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Muscular Differences Between Female Power and Endurance Athletes

Muscular Differences Between Female Power and Endurance Athletes

Date: August 1997
Creator: Akers, Allen (Roy Allen)
Description: The purpose of this study was to compare the torque generating capabilities and fatigue responses of female power athletes, female endurance athletes, and age-matched female non-athletic controls.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Effect of Steroid Dose Regimen on the Relationship Between Lower Extremity Muscle Function and Cardiac Function in Post Heart Transplant Patients

The Effect of Steroid Dose Regimen on the Relationship Between Lower Extremity Muscle Function and Cardiac Function in Post Heart Transplant Patients

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: May 2001
Creator: Galatas, Mary V.
Description: Differences in cardiovascular/aerobic function in heart transplant patients might be attributed to the rate of corticosteroid withdrawal and/or to skeletal muscle function. This hypothesis was tested among nine male, cardiac transplant recipients. Prednisone dosage was monitored, and isokinetic strength testing was performed at 4 different time periods throughout the first year post-transplantation. Cardiovascular/aerobic measurements were obtained at the fourth time period. Pre-surgery characteristics were obtained from the patient's medical record. Significant Pearson-product moment correlations were only found between muscle function and aerobic function and between pre-surgery characteristics and cardiovascular/aerobic performance. The results of this study show no evidence that rapid reduction of prednisone dosage enhances aerobic function by benefiting skeletal muscle function.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Oxygen Uptake Kinetics in Severe Intensity Exercise

Oxygen Uptake Kinetics in Severe Intensity Exercise

Date: May 2000
Creator: Blumoff, Sonja
Description: The purpose of this study was to describe mathematically the oxygen uptake kinetics during cycle ergometry, and to examine the effect of intensity on the kinetic responses within the severe domain. Sixteen volunteers performed a series of exercise tests at a range of intensities selected to elicit fatigue in ~3 to 10 min. A simple mono-exponential model effectively described the response across all intensities. There was a positive correlation between the response time and the time to fatigue, demonstrating that the maximal oxygen uptake was achieved faster at higher intensities within the severe domain. Models incorporating two components effectively described the responses only in tests lasting 8 min or more. It was concluded that there is a second, slow component in the oxygen uptake response only at the lower intensities within the severe domain.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
NCAA division I athletes preferences for coaching behaviors.

NCAA division I athletes preferences for coaching behaviors.

Date: December 2003
Creator: Barnes, Kelly A.
Description: The purpose of this study was to determine whether coaching behavior preferences of NCAA Division I athletes differ as a function of gender and type of sport. The Coaching Behavior Questionnare (CBQ; Martin & Barnes, 1999) was administered to 195 NCAA Division I athletes. Gender and sport type were the independent variables and the participant's mean scores for the subscales on the CBQ were the dependent variables. Descriptive statistics revealed that, overall, NCAA Division I athletes prefer positive and instructional behaviors more than non-responses or negative behaviors. A 2 (gender) x 3 (type of sport) MANOVA and follow-up discriminant function analysis indicated that coaching behavior preferences differed as a function of gender and type of sport played. Thus, NCAA Division I coaches should consider both individual and situational characteristics when working with their athletes to achieve the desired outcome.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The effect of mode and intensity on VO2 kinetics in the severe intensity domain

The effect of mode and intensity on VO2 kinetics in the severe intensity domain

Date: May 2000
Creator: Updyke, Rhonda S.
Description: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of mode and intensity on VO2 kinetics in the severe intensity domain. Seventeen participants completed 3-7 tests each on a cycle ergometer and treadmill. For each test, Tfatigue, VO2max, Tmean response, VO2GAIN, TVO2max and T@VO2max were determined. Linear regression techniques were used to describe the relationship between TVO2max and Tfatigue . VO2max values were higher in running. The VO2 response profile was faster for running than cycling and faster at higher intensities. The faster VO2 response in running may be associated with larger active muscle mass or differences in muscle activation patterns. The faster response at higher intensities may suggest that VO2 response is driven by O2 demand.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Timed Vs. Untimed Initiation Intervals and the Effects of Confidence on a Golf Putting Task

Timed Vs. Untimed Initiation Intervals and the Effects of Confidence on a Golf Putting Task

Date: August 1999
Creator: Sundberg, Jeffrey D.
Description: Low, moderate, and high handicap golfers, while wearing glasses with a blinder on the side, attempted 9 putts differing in length from 5 to 21 ft under timed (less than 3.5s from grounding of club to initiation of back swing) and untimed conditions in a counterbalanced design. Confidence ratings were taken prior to and following each putt. The results revealed a significant condition by handicap group interaction (p=.021). The lower handicap group had a more consistent and lower initiation interval duration than did the moderate and high handicap players. Post interviews determined that 33 of the 35 golfers felt more comfortable in the untimed condition. However, golfers' confidence levels were not significantly different in the untimed condition as compared to the timed condition.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
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