Gloves

Gloves

Date: 1950~
Creator: unknown
Description: Pair of gloves of white cotton. The daytime gloves are wrist length, with 3 tucks at top along back of hand, and a 1/2" fold-over band at wrist hem.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
Mitts

Mitts

Date: 186u
Creator: unknown
Description: Pair of ivory cotton or silk mitts. The elbow-length fingerless gloves are of crocheted ivory material in the style of the 1860's. The long sleeves have bands of lacework patterning. The hands are fingerless, with cording between where fingers would go, and an oval opening for the thumb.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
Mitts

Mitts

Date: [1850..1867]
Creator: unknown
Description: Pair of black cotton lace mitts. The wrist-length fingerless gloves are of hand-crocheted lace, in a wide mesh. Slight frill at wrist, and separate thumb. A narrow black ribbon is threaded through the cuff, one ribbon lacking.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
Mitts

Mitts

Date: 1965~
Creator: Hansen Glove Corporation
Description: Pair of off-white nylon mitts. The elbow-length fingerless gloves have a loop for the thumb, and are embellished along the finger opening with a trim of openwork daisy heads. Stamped: "Nylasuede / by Hansen / 6 1/2"
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
Gloves

Gloves

Date: 1950~
Creator: unknown
Description: Pair of gloves of white cotton. The plain, daytime gloves are wrist-length. Retailer's label sewn inside: "Made in Western Germany / expressly for / Neiman-Marcus / 100% Cotton"
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
Gloves

Gloves

Date: 1955~
Creator: Fare, Roger
Description: Pair of gloves of tan suede. The wrist-length gloves are plain, with hand-stitching. Size/Designer Label stamped inside: "7 / Made in France / by / Roger Fare" Retailer Label: "Neiman-Marcus / Made in France"
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
Dried plutonium nitrate decontamination using HNO{sub 3} or Freon 113

Dried plutonium nitrate decontamination using HNO{sub 3} or Freon 113

Date: February 4, 1988
Creator: Holcomb, H. P.
Description: A request was made of the Separations Technology Laboratory to perform tests to determine the relative effectiveness of Freon 113 and 18% (3.15M) nitric acid on removing dried plutonium nitrate from Hypalon{reg_sign} gloves destined for use in F B-Line. Freon 113 was very inefficient for removing dried plutonium nitrate under conditions of moderate agitation of the liquid in contact with the dried compound. Nitric acid proved to be an excellent agent for decontaminating purposes for both the gloves and for the Pyrex glass. In tests conducted on the glass or on the gloves on which dried plutonium nitrate had not been removed by Freon 113, followup with nitric acid efficiently removed the residual plutonium nitrate. Tests were also conducted to give some measure of the resistance of the Hypalon glove to continuous contact with 18% HNO{sub 3} or with Freon 113. Following two weeks` immersion, there was little physical difference noted from the starting material, except the glove piece immersed in the Freon underwent an 8% weight gain.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Glovebox characterization and barrier integrity testing using fluorescent powder

Glovebox characterization and barrier integrity testing using fluorescent powder

Date: July 1, 1996
Creator: Wahlquist, D.R.
Description: This paper presents a method for characterizing the spread of contamination and testing the barrier integrity of a new glovebox during material transfer operations and glove change-outs using fluorescent powder. Argonne National Laboratory-West has performed this test on several new gloveboxes prior to putting them into service. The test is performed after the glovebox has been leak tested and all systems have been verified to be operational. The purpose of the test is to show that bag-in/bag-out operations and glove change-outs can be accomplished without spreading the actual contaminated material to non-contaminated areas. The characterization test also provides information as to where contamination might be expected to build-up during actual operations. The fluorescent powder is used because it is easily detectable using an ultra-violet light and disperses in a similar fashion to radioactive material. The characterization and barrier integrity test of a glovebox using fluorescent powder provides a visual method of determining areas of potential contamination accumulation and helps evaluate the ability to perform clean transfer operations and glove change-outs.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Technology Development, Evaluation, and Application (TDEA) FY 1995 progress report - Environmental, Safety, and Health (ESH) division

Technology Development, Evaluation, and Application (TDEA) FY 1995 progress report - Environmental, Safety, and Health (ESH) division

Date: September 1, 1996
Creator: Andrews, L.L.
Description: This report covers six months of effort, including startup time. Five projects were supported by the division: Pilot Program for the Risk-Based Surveillance of Lung Cancer in Los Alamos National Laboratory Workers, Optimization of Placement of Workplace Continuous Air Monitoring Instrumentation, A Polymeric Barrier Monitor to Protect Workers, Evaluation of a Real-Time Beryllium Detection Instrument and the Implications of Its Use, and High-Energy Dosimetry. A project summary for each is provided. An appendix to the report includes the 1995 Request for Proposals, Committee Members, Priority Technical Areas of Interest for FY95, Relative Prioritization and Weighting Factors, Format for Proposals, and Charter.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
A new glove for glovebox workers

A new glove for glovebox workers

Date: October 1, 1996
Creator: Macdonald, J.M.; Nekimken, H.L.; Hermes, R.E.; Castro, J.M. & Evans, M.E.
Description: Lead-lined gloves used during the processing of nuclear materials within gloveboxes is an example of a barrier. To help prevent work contamination, current practice includes visual inspection and radiological monitoring of each glove on a regular basis. One administrative control requires radiological workers to monitor their hands upon removal form the glovebox gloves. In reality, either a catastrophic glove failure or the formation of pinholes can cause contamination which is detected after the fact. Real-time monitoring of glove integrity during use would help prevent the spread of contamination, minimize decontamination costs, and protect the glovebox worker. Another benefit of real-time monitoring is remotely alerting proper personnel of a glovebox glove breech. One of the most exciting aspects of this technology is the rapid detection of a breech in the glovebox glove. A puncture to a glove can be detected followed by an alert to a worker in less than a second. The benefits of a real-time monitoring system for glove integrity are immense. Examples of benefits using this new glove are: reducing work stoppage, personnel contamination, glovebox glove replacements, and the filing of costly reports. The primary application of this technology at Los Alamos National Laboratory would be protecting the ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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