China's Currency: Economic Issues and Options for U.S. Trade Policy

China's Currency: Economic Issues and Options for U.S. Trade Policy

Date: April 18, 2006
Creator: Morrison, Wayne M & Labonte, Marc
Description: When the U.S. runs a trade deficit with the Chinese, this requires a capital inflow from China to the United States. This, in turn, lowers U.S. interest rates and increases U.S. investment spending. On the negative side, lower priced goods from China may hurt U.S. industries that compete with those products, reducing their production and employment. In addition, an undervalued yuan makes U.S. exports to China more expensive, thus reducing the level of U.S. exports to China and job opportunities for U.S. workers in those sectors. However, in the long run, trade can affect only the composition of employment, not its overall level. Thus, inducing China to appreciate its currency would likely benefit some U.S. economic sectors, but would harm others, including U.S. consumers. Several estimates of the yuan’s undervaluation are evaluated in the report.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Agriculture: U.S.-China Trade Issues

Agriculture: U.S.-China Trade Issues

Date: October 16, 2002
Creator: Becker, Geoffrey S & Hanrahan, Charles E
Description: With China’s entry into the World Trade Organization (WTO) in December 2001, U.S. agricultural interests were hopeful that longstanding barriers to trade with that vast and growing market would begin to fall. However, critics charge that China is failing to honor commitments to open its markets, affecting U.S. exports of grains, oilseeds, meat and poultry, and other products. U.S. agriculture and trade officials have been working to resolve these differences.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
China-U.S. Trade Issues

China-U.S. Trade Issues

Date: July 12, 2006
Creator: Morrison, Wayne M
Description: U.S.-China economic ties have expanded substantially over the past several years. China is now the third largest U.S. trading partner, its second largest source of imports, and its fourth largest export market. However, U.S.-China commercial ties have been strained by a number of issues, including a surging U.S. trade deficit with China, China's refusal to float its currency, and failure to fully comply with its World Trade Organization (WTO) commitments, especially its failure to provide protection for U.S. intellectual property rights (IPR). This report explores these issues in detail, especially concerning the lack of protection for U.S. IPR.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
China's Most-Favored-Nation Status: U.S. Wheat, Corn, and Soybean Exports

China's Most-Favored-Nation Status: U.S. Wheat, Corn, and Soybean Exports

Date: June 4, 1996
Creator: Sek, Lenore
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
China's Exchange Rate Peg:  Economic Issues and Options for U.S. Trade Policy

China's Exchange Rate Peg: Economic Issues and Options for U.S. Trade Policy

Date: May 10, 2005
Creator: Morrison, Wayne M & Labonte, Marc
Description: The continued rise in the U.S.-China trade imbalance and complaints from U.S. manufacturing firms and workers over the competitive challenges posed by cheap Chinese imports have led several Members to call for a more aggressive U.S. stance against certain Chinese trade policies they deem to be unfair, such as China’s policy of pegging its currency (the yuan) to the U.S. dollar. Some Members assert this policy constitutes a form of “currency manipulation” intended to give China an unfair trade advantage and is contributing to the loss of U.S. manufacturing jobs.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
China's Trade with the United States and the World

China's Trade with the United States and the World

Date: August 18, 2006
Creator: Lum, Thomas & Nanto, Dick K
Description: This report provides a quantitative framework for policy considerations dealing with U.S. trade with China. It provides basic data and analysis of China’s international trade with the United States and other countries. Since Chinese data differ considerably from those of its trading partners (because of how entrepot trade through Hong Kong is counted), data from both PRC sources and those of its trading partners are presented. Charts showing import trends by sector for the United States highlight China’s growing market shares in many industries and also show import shares for Japan, Canada, Mexico, the European Union, and the Association for Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN ).
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department