The Effects of Biofeedback and Verbal Feedback on the Training and Maintenance of Diaphragmatic Breathing

The Effects of Biofeedback and Verbal Feedback on the Training and Maintenance of Diaphragmatic Breathing

Date: May 2003
Creator: Armstrong, Earl E.
Description: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a computer program on the training and maintenance of diaphragmatic breathing. The biofeedback portion was visual computer training and the results were displayed concurrently with participants' breathing responses to monitor display. The verbal feedback portion was praise that was given and recorded when participants responded with predominantly diaphragmatic breathing at the scheduled moment and response instruction that was given when participants responded with predominantly thoracic breathing. The results of this study indicate the computer program's effectiveness needs to be increased by supplementation with verbal feedback.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The effects of a feedback package on the facial orientation of a young girl with autism during restricted and free operant conditions

The effects of a feedback package on the facial orientation of a young girl with autism during restricted and free operant conditions

Date: August 2000
Creator: Jacobs, Wendy Lynn
Description: A multiple baseline design across activities and people was used to assess the effectiveness of a feedback package on the facial orientation of a young girl with autism. During baseline, observations indicated low rates of facial orientation and high rates of gaze avoidance during conversation (restricted operant) and play (free operant) conditions. After treatment, facial orientation rates increased and gaze avoidance rates decreased to levels similar to typically-developing peers and maintained at one month follow up. These results suggest that the feedback package was effective in producing durable facial orientation across different environments and people. Possible interpretations, strengths, and limitations are discussed.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Effects of goal setting, e-mail feedback and graphic feedback on the productivity of public school attendance clerks

Effects of goal setting, e-mail feedback and graphic feedback on the productivity of public school attendance clerks

Date: August 2000
Creator: Rexroat, Robin D.
Description: A package intervention, consisting of daily-adjusted goal setting, e-mail feedback, and graphic feedback, was used in a public school attendance office to increase the efficiency with which 3 attendance clerks documented student attendance. During the intervention phase, the attendance secretary set a daily goal for each attendance clerk. This goal was a percentage of student absences to be coded and entered in the school computer program. After establishing a daily goal, the attendance secretary provided daily feedback, in the form of a written e-mail response and graphed feedback to each clerk. If the subjects had attained their daily goal, the attendance secretary also delivered a praise statement along with the e-mail feedback. Results indicated that the intervention package was ineffective in producing change in the attendance clerks' absence coding behavior.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Effects of Cumulative Consumption Feedback On Demand For Money As A Commodity

The Effects of Cumulative Consumption Feedback On Demand For Money As A Commodity

Date: May 2001
Creator: Bailey, Kathleen
Description: Behavioral economic theory describes a relation between response requirement and magnitude of reinforcement, and combines these variables into one independent variable (unit price) affecting operant behavior. This study investigated the relative effects of cumulative feedback on consumption for money as a commodity. Subjects were exposed to ranges of unit prices with or without a cumulative feedback bar on the computer screen indicating monetary earnings. For all participants in this study, consumption of money was a decreasing function of unit prices and the results from the present study are consistent with the behavioral economic prediction that increasing the unit price of a commodity will decrease consumption of that commodity. Analyses of demand curves, elasticity coefficients and response rates suggested differences between Feedback and No Feedback groups, although these were small and not statistically significant. The small differences observed were consistent with a behavior strengthening effect of feedback.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Does the Provision of an Intensive and Highly Focused Indirect Corrective Feedback Lead to Accuracy?

Does the Provision of an Intensive and Highly Focused Indirect Corrective Feedback Lead to Accuracy?

Date: May 2010
Creator: Jhowry, Kheerani
Description: This thesis imparts the outcomes of a seven-week long quasi-experimental study that explored whether or not L2 learners who received intensive and highly focused indirect feedback on one type of treatable error - either the third person singular -s, plural endings -s, or definite article the - eventually become more accurate in the post-test as compared to a control group that did not. The paired-samples t-test comparing the pre-test and post-test scores of both groups demonstrates that the experimental group did no better than the control group after they received indirect corrective feedback. The independent samples t-test measuring the experimental and control group's accuracy shows no significant difference between the two groups. Effect sizes calculated, however, do indicate that, had the sample sizes been bigger, both groups would have eventually become more accurate in the errors targeted, although this would not have been because of the indirect feedback.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Analysis of leadership perceptions using multirater feedback.

Analysis of leadership perceptions using multirater feedback.

Date: May 2004
Creator: Bradley, Thomas P.
Description: Performance improvement intervention begins with assessment. How that assessment is interpreted can mean the difference between success and failure. Previous research of 360-degree feedback instruments has tried to reconcile the differences between multiple rater groups. Rather than searching for agreement, this research proposes to understand the meaning of the differences using multirater feedback. Individuals determine ratings based upon their own perspective and building upon the understanding of rater perspective may result in improved assessments. Data from an existing data set was processed using a second-order CFA in structural equation modeling. Covariance between the second-order factors and rater groups determined the difference in how each rater group perceived the leader.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Effects of an Electronic Feedback Sign on Speeding

The Effects of an Electronic Feedback Sign on Speeding

Date: May 2006
Creator: Flores, Jaime
Description: Although a handful of experiments have utilized indirect feedback in attempts to reduce speeding on roadways, fewer experiments have utilized direct feedback as a means to reduce incidences of speeding. The current study evaluated the effects of direct and individualized feedback provided by a large electronic feedback sign that displayed the speed of oncoming vehicles as they approached the sign along the roadways of a college campus. The effects of the sign were evaluated using a non-simultaneous multiple baseline experimental design employing two control conditions and intervention phase. Each condition was implemented at three sites on the college campus. The results showed that intervention produced significant decreases in both measures of vehicle speeds at each site, relative to measures collected during both control conditions.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Tracking to Pliance: Effects of Punishment on Non-Compliance

Tracking to Pliance: Effects of Punishment on Non-Compliance

Date: August 2005
Creator: Harmon, D. Austin
Description: Inaccurate instructions have been shown to interfere with or override the effects of otherwise effective behavioral contingencies. This effect may be mediated by such factors as the discriminability of current contingencies, histories with accurate and inaccurate instructions, and consequences associated with following instructions. The current experiment investigated the effects of instructions (both accurate and inaccurate) on response patterns when paired with feedback regarding correspondence between responding and instructions, feedback indicating potential point loss for non-correspondence, and point loss for non-correspondence. Inaccurate instructions produced only small and temporary disruptions in response patterns, as did the addition of feedback alone and feedback indicating potential point loss. The introduction of escalating point losses contingent on non-correspondence, ranging from 20%-50% of points earned, produced changes in response patterns that corresponded to the inaccurate instructions. These outcomes indicate that the imposition of direct consequences for noncompliance may alter the effects of other contingencies. Depending on the point at which point losses disrupt responding, such effects may be interpreted in terms of point loss avoidance or, alternatively, maximizing point gains.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Effect of Two Methods of Reporting Pupil Progress on Adjustment and Achievement of Fourth Grade Students in a Suburban Elementary School

The Effect of Two Methods of Reporting Pupil Progress on Adjustment and Achievement of Fourth Grade Students in a Suburban Elementary School

Date: August 1971
Creator: Horn, John Duane, 1941-
Description: The present research was an investigation of the effect of two methods of reporting pupil progress on adjustment and achievement of fourth grade pupils in a suburban elementary school. One method involved the use of an evaluation form reflecting performance in terms of ability, parent-teacher conferences, and work samples. The other method was comprised primarily of competitive grading and marking procedures, utilizing a standard report card to report results.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
A Comparison of Focused Feedback Techniques in Individual Counseling

A Comparison of Focused Feedback Techniques in Individual Counseling

Date: August 1972
Creator: Bucur, Raymond Roy
Description: The problem with which this study is concerned is a comparison of the effects of three methods of focused feedback upon selected client behaviors in individual counseling. This study has a twofold purpose. The first is to examine which of three methods of focused feedback (videotape, audiotape, or verbal) is most effective in producing selected behavioral changes in clients seen in individual counseling. The second is to compare the effects of the three methods of focused feedback on individual clients with the effects of a traditional individual counseling approach that did not utilize focused feedback.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
FIRST PREV 1 2 NEXT LAST