The Status of the Basel III Capital Adequacy Accord

The Status of the Basel III Capital Adequacy Accord

Date: October 28, 2010
Creator: Eubanks, Walter W.
Description: The new Basel Capital Adequacy Accord (Basel III) is an agreement among countries' central banks and bank supervisory authorities on the amount of capital banks must hold as a cushion against losses and insolvency. Basel III is of concern to Congress mainly because it could put U.S. financial institutions at a competitive disadvantage in world financial markets. This report follows the basic elements of the Basel III documents on the types of capital requirements and their phase-in schedule, which were approved by the Basel member central bank governors on September 12, 2010. The elements are the new definition of Tier 1 capital, the minimum common equity capital, the capital conservation buffer, countercyclical capital buffer, liquidity coverage ratio, global leverage ratio, and wind-down government capital injections. The report concludes with some implications drawn from its content.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Basel Accords: The Implementation of II and the Modification of I

The Basel Accords: The Implementation of II and the Modification of I

Date: February 21, 2006
Creator: Eubanks, Walter W
Description: This report provides the basic information needed to understand the issues surrounding the proposed implementation of Basel II and the pending proposed modifications of Basel I in the United States. First, it gives a basic background on capital standards and how capital assessments were made before these accords. Second, it briefly explains how Basel I works. Third, it addresses the major problem with Basel I and the modifications being considered. Fourth, it describes the Basel II framework the United States may implement and the framework the EU is already implementing. The report concludes with a section on Congress and the Basel Accords.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Federal Financial Services Regulatory Consolidation: An Overview

Federal Financial Services Regulatory Consolidation: An Overview

Date: August 17, 2005
Creator: Eubanks, Walter W
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Financial Services Regulatory Relief in the 109th Congress: H.R. 3505 and S. 2856

Financial Services Regulatory Relief in the 109th Congress: H.R. 3505 and S. 2856

Date: July 24, 2006
Creator: Eubanks, Walter W
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Electronic Banking: The Check Truncation Issue

Electronic Banking: The Check Truncation Issue

Date: October 3, 2003
Creator: Eubanks, Walter W
Description: If all checks were replaced by electronic transactions, the exact cost savings would still be unknown, because estimates of the cost of using a check and the number of checks written each year remain in dispute. Consequently, estimates of cost savings range from $1.4 billion annually for truncation alone to $68 billion for replacing checks with electronic payments. A significant part of the savings comes from eliminating the handling, sorting, and physically transporting of checks to the paying bank. To clear checks electronically, banks must negotiate processing agreements thatmake it unnecessary to physically present the paper check. Since the benefits are not uniformly dispersed among the participants, banks have found it difficult to obtain these agreements, thus constraining the widespread adoption of electronic check clearing.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Electronic Banking: The Check Truncation Issue

Electronic Banking: The Check Truncation Issue

Date: July 3, 2003
Creator: Eubanks, Walter W
Description: If all checks were replaced by electronic transactions, the exact cost savings would still be unknown, because estimates of the cost of using a check and the number of checks written each year remain in dispute. Consequently, estimates of cost savings range from $1.4 billion annually for truncation alone to $68 billion for replacing checks with electronic payments. A significant part of the savings comes from eliminating the handling, sorting, and physically transporting of checks to the paying bank. To clear checks electronically, banks must negotiate processing agreements thatmake it unnecessary to physically present the paper check. Since the benefits are not uniformly dispersed among the participants, banks have found it difficult to obtain these agreements, thus constraining the widespread adoption of electronic check clearing.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Electronic Banking: The Check Truncation Issue

Electronic Banking: The Check Truncation Issue

Date: May 30, 2003
Creator: Eubanks, Walter W
Description: If all checks were replaced by electronic transactions, the exact cost savings would still be unknown, because estimates of the cost of using a check and the number of checks written each year remain in dispute. Consequently, estimates of cost savings range from $1.4 billion annually for truncation alone to $68 billion for replacing checks with electronic payments. A significant part of the savings comes from eliminating the handling, sorting, and physically transporting of checks to the paying bank. To clear checks electronically, banks must negotiate processing agreements thatmake it unnecessary to physically present the paper check. Since the benefits are not uniformly dispersed among the participants, banks have found it difficult to obtain these agreements, thus constraining the widespread adoption of electronic check clearing.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Electronic Payments and the U.S. Payments System

Electronic Payments and the U.S. Payments System

Date: June 27, 2002
Creator: Eubanks, Walter W & Smale, Pauline
Description: This report provides a framework for understanding the paper-based and electronic components of the current U.S. payments system. It begins with a basic overview of the payments system, explaining the relative size and growth of various methods of payment. The report discusses paper-based payments and then examines the operations of wholesale and retail electronic payments. Finally, the report discusses some of the major policy issues concerning the regulation and supervision of electronic payments.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department