Foundations of Environmental Ethics

Foundations of Environmental Ethics

Date: 1989
Creator: Hargrove, Eugene C., 1944-
Description: This book examines the social and philosophical attitudes in Western culture that relate to the environment including aesthetics, wildlife, and land use. Both the historical significance and a framework for further discussions of environmental ethics are discussed in the book.
Contributing Partner: UNT Center For Environmental Philosophy
The Beauty of Environment: A General Model for Environmental Aesthetics

The Beauty of Environment: A General Model for Environmental Aesthetics

Date: 1993
Creator: Sepänmaa, Yrjö
Description: This book is a "systematic outlining of the field of environmental aesthetics beginning from the basis of analytical philosophy" (p. ix). The author discusses ecological and anthropological aesthetics, environmental ethics, the relation of art to nature, and environmental education and legislation. The index begins on page 188.
Contributing Partner: UNT Center For Environmental Philosophy
Disturbing Nature's Beauty: Environmental Aesthetics in a New Ecological Paradigm

Disturbing Nature's Beauty: Environmental Aesthetics in a New Ecological Paradigm

Date: August 2009
Creator: Simus, Jason Boaz
Description: An ecological paradigm shift from the "balance of nature" to the "flux of nature" will change the way we aesthetically appreciate nature if we adopt scientific cognitivism-the view that aesthetic appreciation of nature must be informed by scientific knowledge. Aesthetic judgments are subjective, though we talk about aesthetic qualities as if they were objectively inherent in objects, events, or environments. Aesthetic judgments regarding nature are correct insofar as they are part of a community consensus regarding the currently dominant scientific paradigm. Ecological science is grounded in metaphors: nature is a divine order, a machine, an organism, a community, or a cybernetic system. These metaphors stimulate and guide scientific practice, but do not exist independent of a conceptual framework. They are at most useful fictions in terms of how they reflect the values underlying a paradigm. Contemporary ecology is a science driven more by aesthetic than metaphysical considerations. I review concepts in the history of nature aesthetics such as the picturesque, the sublime, disinterestedness, and formalism. I propose an analogy: just as knowledge of art history and theory should inform aesthetic appreciation of art, knowledge of natural history and ecological theory should inform aesthetic appreciation of nature. The "framing problem," is ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries