[Review] Changing Minds: The Shifting Perception of Culture in Eighteenth-Century France

[Review] Changing Minds: The Shifting Perception of Culture in Eighteenth-Century France

Date: February 2005
Creator: Kaplan, Marijn S.
Description: This article reviews the book "Changing Minds: The Shifting Perception of Culture in Eighteenth-Century France," by John C. O'Neal, published in 2002.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Arts and Sciences
[Review] The Fiction of Enlightenment. Women of Reason in the French Eighteenth Century

[Review] The Fiction of Enlightenment. Women of Reason in the French Eighteenth Century

Date: 2011
Creator: Kaplan, Marijn S.
Description: This article reviews the book "The Fiction of Enlightenment. Women of Reason in the French Eighteenth Century," by Heidi Bostic and published in 2010.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Arts and Sciences
The Enlightenment Legacy of David Hume

The Enlightenment Legacy of David Hume

Date: December 1989
Creator: Jenkins, Joan (Joan Elizabeth)
Description: Although many historians assert the unity of the Enlightenment, their histories essentially belie this notion. Consequently, Enlightenment history is confused and meaningless, urging the reader to believe that diversity is similarity and faction is unity. Fundamental among the common denominators of these various interpretations, however, are the scientific method and empirical observation, as introduced by Newton. These, historians acclaim as the turning point when mankind escaped the ignorance of superstition and the oppression of the church, and embarked upon the modern secular age. The Enlightenment, however, founders immediately upon its own standards of empiricism and demonstrable philosophical tenets, with the exception of David Hume. As the most consistent and fearless empiricist of the era, Hume's is by far the most "legitimate" philosophy of the Enlightenment, but it starkly contrasts the rhetoric and ideology of the philosophe community, and, therefore, defies attempts by historians to incorporate it into the traditional Enlightenment picture. Hume, then, exposes the Enlightenment dilemma: either the Enlightenment is not empirical, but rather the new Age of Faith Carl Becker proclaimed it, or Enlightenment philosophy is that of Hume. This study presents the historical characterization of major Enlightenment themes, such as method, reason, religion, morality, and politics, then ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries