The Papal Aggression: Creation of the Roman Catholic Hierarchy in England, 1850

The Papal Aggression: Creation of the Roman Catholic Hierarchy in England, 1850

Date: January 1969
Creator: Paz, D.G. (Denis G.)
Description: This thesis studies the Papal Aggression in England, which was the zealous reaction to a papal decree that had created territorial hierarchy for English Roman Catholics. The study seeks answers to the following questions: Why did the pope create the heirarchy? Why did the English people react so vehemently? Why did Lord John Russell write his Durham Letter? Why did the government fail to enforce the Ecclesiastical Titles Act? What light, if any, does this episode shed on the zeitgeist of the Victorian Age?
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Victorian Ideology and British Children's Literature, 1870-1914

Victorian Ideology and British Children's Literature, 1870-1914

Date: August 1969
Creator: Trugman, Ann
Description: In many nations, children's literature is a propaganda element for society. The structure of society, both real and imagined, and the composition of the immature mind make children's literature, both good and bad, a method by which to shape future citizens. Through studying the literature of a particular period and in one country, the relationship between children's literature and the history of the times and the ideals of the adults of that age is made clearer. Literature for the young is a record of the spirit of the times.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Medicine in Tudor and Stuart England: a Study in Social History

Medicine in Tudor and Stuart England: a Study in Social History

Date: August 1954
Creator: Reinmiller, Elinor C.
Description: Prior to the sixteenth century very little progress had been made in the science of medicine since the Galenic age in Greece. The advent of the Renaissance with its revival of learning produced far-reaching changes in all branches of knowledge. In medicine and science the impact of the new forces was particularly significant. This thesis shows the development of medicine during this time period.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
[Flying Buttresses]

[Flying Buttresses]

Date: unknown
Creator: Gough, Ray
Description: Photograph of flying buttresses on a building in England. The buttresses are visible in the foreground along with large windows on the building.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
[Cathedral]

[Cathedral]

Date: unknown
Creator: Gough, Ray
Description: Photograph of a cathedral in England. In the foreground, numerous people walk on the grass in front of the cathedral. The cathedral fills the rest of the frame.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
[The Royal Hotel]

[The Royal Hotel]

Date: unknown
Creator: Gough, Ray
Description: Photograph of the Royal Hotel sign on a street in England. In the foreground, the street lined with houses is visible. Men and women walk on the sidewalk. The hotel sign is visible in the right foreground sticking out from a building. It is a sign for the Royal Hotel Garage.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
[Statues]

[Statues]

Date: unknown
Creator: Gough, Ray
Description: Photograph of statues on a church in England. The male statues are placed in the niches on the exterior of the church. The figures are visible in the left foreground. A stained glass window is visible in the right top corner.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
[Couple]

[Couple]

Date: unknown
Creator: Gough, Ray
Description: Photograph of a couple in front of a stone wall in England. Trees and a tower are visible behind the couple.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
[Stained Glass Windows]

[Stained Glass Windows]

Date: unknown
Creator: Gough, Ray
Description: Photograph of stained glass windows in a church in England. The windows are visible in the center foreground.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
[Castle]

[Castle]

Date: unknown
Creator: Gough, Ray
Description: Photograph of a castle wall in England. Two trees frame the foreground. The wall is visible behind the trees. The castle is situated on a green lawn.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
[Royal Guard]

[Royal Guard]

Date: unknown
Creator: Gough, Ray
Description: Photograph of a building in England. The building is constructed of gray stones with tall arched windows. A British Royal Guard stands outside of the building.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
[Cornice]

[Cornice]

Date: unknown
Creator: Gough, Ray
Description: Photograph of the top cornice of a building in England. The cornice is made of gray stones. A sculpture is inset into the top center rectangle of the cornice. The sculpture depicts a man on a horse slaying a dragon.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
[Castle]

[Castle]

Date: unknown
Creator: Gough, Ray
Description: Photograph of a castle in England. In the foreground, heads of numerous people are visible. The castle is visible in the background.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
[Plane]

[Plane]

Date: unknown
Creator: Gough, Ray
Description: Photograph of a plane in England. In the foreground, the plane is visible in profile. A man stands beside the plane. Trees are visible in the background.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
[England]

[England]

Date: unknown
Creator: Gough, Ray
Description: Photograph of a building in England. The building in the foreground is made of brown stone. The top floor and roof line are visible.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
The Moral Philosophy of Samuel Johnson

The Moral Philosophy of Samuel Johnson

Date: 1949
Creator: Love, Corrie
Description: The purpose of the author is to give a resume of Johnson's England and by examining The Rambler and Boswell's Life of Johnson, to determine what the Doctor thought concerning the prevailing conditions, social practices, and ideas of his time.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Orality-Literacy Theory and the Victorian Sermon

Orality-Literacy Theory and the Victorian Sermon

Date: May 1995
Creator: Ellison, Robert H. (Robert Howard)
Description: In this study, I expand the scope of the scholarship that Walter Ong and others have done in orality-literacy relations to examine the often uneasy juxtaposition of the oral and written traditions in the literature of the Victorian pulpit. I begin by examining the intersections of the oral and written traditions found in both the theory and the practice of Victorian preaching. I discuss the prominent place of the sermon within both the print and oral cultures of Victorian Britain; argue that the sermon's status as both oration and essay places it in the genre of "oral literature"; and analyze the debate over the extent to which writing should be employed in the preparation and delivery of sermons.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Destruction of the Imagery of Saint Thomas Becket

The Destruction of the Imagery of Saint Thomas Becket

Date: May 1998
Creator: Cucuzzella, Jean Moore
Description: This thesis analyzes the destruction of imagery dedicated to Saint Thomas Becket in order to investigate the nature of sixteenth-century iconoclasm in Reformation England. In doing so, it also considers the veneration of images during the late Middle Ages and the Renaissance. Research involved examining medieval and sixteenth-century historical studies concerning Becket's life and cult, anti-Becket sentiment prior to the sixteenth century, and the political circumstances in England that led to the destruction of shrines and imagery. This study provides insight into the ways in which religious images could carry multifaceted, ideological significance that represented diversified ideas for varying social strata--royal, ecclesiastical and lay.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Obedience and Disobedience in English Political Thought, 1528-1558

Obedience and Disobedience in English Political Thought, 1528-1558

Date: August 1994
Creator: Culberson, James Kevin
Description: English political thought from 1528 to 1558 was dominated by the question of obedience to civil authority. English Lutherans stressed the duty of obedience to the prince as the norm; however, if he commands that which is immoral one should passively disobey. The defenders of Henrician royal supremacy, while attempting to strengthen the power of the crown, used similar arguments to stress unquestioned obedience to the king. During Edward VI's reign this teaching of obedience was popularized from the pulpit. However, with the accession of Mary a new view regarding obedience gained prominence. Several important Marian exiles contended that the principle that God is to be obeyed rather than man entails the duty of Christians to resist idolatrous and evil rulers for the sake of the true Protestant religion.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Decline of the Country-House Poem in England: A Study in the History of Ideas

The Decline of the Country-House Poem in England: A Study in the History of Ideas

Date: August 1988
Creator: Harris, Candice R. (Candice Rae)
Description: This study discusses the evolution of the English country-house poem from its inception by Ben Jonson in "To Penshurst" to the present. It shows that in addition to stylistic and thematic borrowings primarily from Horace and Martial, traditional English values associated with the great hall and comitatus ideal helped define features of the English country-house poem, to which Jonson added the metonymical use of architecture. In the Jonsonian country-house poem, the country estate, exemplified by Penshurst, is a microcosm of the ideal English social organization characterized by interdependence, simplicity, service, hospitality, and balance between the active and contemplative life. Those poems which depart from the Jonsonian ideal are characterized by disequilibrium between the active and contemplative life, resulting in the predominance of artifice, subordination of nature, and isolation of art from the community, as exemplified by Thomas Carew's "To Saxham" and Richard Lovelace's "Amyntor's Grove." Architectural features of the English country house are examined to explain the absence of the Jonsonian country-house poem in the eighteenth century. The building tradition praised by Jonson gradually gave way to aesthetic considerations fostered by the professional architect and Palladian architecture, architectural patronage by the middle class, and change in identity of the country ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Early English Ballad and Its Influence on Classical English Song

The Early English Ballad and Its Influence on Classical English Song

Date: June 1948
Creator: Richards, Evan Cater
Description: The English classical song is peculiarly native to Britain. It roots in the mystic elements of ballads and nature. It was the influence of the early English ballad, first spoken, then sung, then joined in the happy culmination of voice and melody to make a song that is immortal and unique in music.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
England and the International Monetary System of the Nineteenth Century

England and the International Monetary System of the Nineteenth Century

Date: May 1963
Creator: Murray, Jack W.
Description: There were two international standards in the nineteenth century, the theoretical gold standard and the historical sterling standard. The primary interest of this thesis is the latter, although the theoretical framework of the gold standard will also be examined. Because of its role in the London money market, particular attention will be given to the Bank of England. Since the Bank and the international standards were products of the evolutionary and revolutionary changes which occurred in Britain during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, an attempt will be made to examine them within their historical context.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Crinoline

Crinoline

Date: 1860
Creator: unknown
Description: Off-white crinoline with spring steel hoops. Covered in fabric with white on white woven design of "H" shapes. Metal fastener at front of 1" wide waist band. First four rows of springs only go half-way around skirt and are tied around the body in front. Last five rows form complete circle or hoop. No labels in garment. Attached tag with what appears to be an auction lot number, "253".
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
The British Foreign Office Views and the Making of the 1907 Anglo-Russian Entente, From the 1890s Through August 1907

The British Foreign Office Views and the Making of the 1907 Anglo-Russian Entente, From the 1890s Through August 1907

Date: August 1998
Creator: Blevins, Jeff T. (Jeff Taylor)
Description: This thesis examines British Foreign Office views of Russia and Anglo-Russian relations prior to the 1907 Anglo-Russian Entente. British diplomatic documents, memoirs, and papers in the Public Record Office reveal diplomatic concern with ending Central Asian tensions. This study examines Anglo-Russian relations from the pre-Lansdowne era, including agreements with Japan (1902) and France (1904), the Russo-Japanese war of 1904-05, and the shift in Liberal thinking up to the Anglo-Russian Entente. The main reason British diplomats negotiated the Entente was less to end Central Asian friction, this thesis concludes, than the need to check Germany, which some Foreign Office members believed, was bent upon European hegemony.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
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