Transformational Paradigm for Engineering and Engineering Technology Education

Transformational Paradigm for Engineering and Engineering Technology Education

Date: November 2008
Creator: Barbieri, Enrique & Fitzgibbon, William
Description: This paper discusses a transformational paradigm for engineering and engineering technology education at the baccalaureate level.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Engineering
Evaluation Results of an E and ET Education Forum

Evaluation Results of an E and ET Education Forum

Date: 2011
Creator: Ramos, Miguel; Chapman, Lauren; Cannady, Mac & Barbieri, Enrique
Description: This article discusses evaluation results of an Engineering (E) and Engineering Technology (ET) education forum at the University of Houston. A central focus to these discussions revolved around whether Engineering and Engineering Technology exist as separate fields or whether there was value in thinking about them as part of a continuum.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Engineering
On B.S.E and B.S.ET for the Engineering Profession

On B.S.E and B.S.ET for the Engineering Profession

Date: 2010
Creator: Barbieri, Enrique; Attarzadeh, Farrokh; Pascali, Raresh; Shireen, Wajiha & Fitzgibbon, William
Description: Article discussing biological systems engineering (B.S.E.) and a proposed model for baccalaureate programs for engineering education.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Engineering
OFFICE OF TECHNOLOGY INNOVATION AND DEVELOPMENT TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT REPORT FY2011

OFFICE OF TECHNOLOGY INNOVATION AND DEVELOPMENT TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT REPORT FY2011

Date: October 20, 2011
Creator: Bush, S. & Douglas, B.
Description: No abstract prepared.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Pressure reversal study through tensile tests

Pressure reversal study through tensile tests

Date: December 31, 1997
Creator: Swinson, W.F.; Battiste, R.L.; Wright, A.L.; Yahr, G.T. & Robertson, J.P.
Description: This paper is a summary of the results from a study of the variables related to pressure reversal and was sponsored by the US Department of Transportation, Office of Pipeline Safety. The circumferential pipe stress, which is the most significant variable in pressure reversal, was examined by using tensile specimens and then relating the results to pressurized pipe. A model is proposed that gives some insight into how pressure reversal can be minimized when a section of pipe is being hydrotested. Twenty tensile specimens from X-42 electric resistance welded (ERW) pipe and twenty specimens from X-52 ERW pipe were tested. Each specimen had a machined flaw. The flaw regions were monitored using strain gages and photoelasticity. These tensile tests represent the first phase of a research effort to examine and understand the variables related to pressure reversal. The second phase of this effort will be with pipe specimens and presently is in progress.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
STATUS OF THE LANL ACTIVITIES IN THE FIELD OF RF SUPERCONDUCTIVITY

STATUS OF THE LANL ACTIVITIES IN THE FIELD OF RF SUPERCONDUCTIVITY

Date: August 1, 2001
Creator: TAJIMA, T.; CHAN, K. C. & AL, ET
Description: No abstract prepared.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Energy Technology Division research summary - 1999.

Energy Technology Division research summary - 1999.

Date: March 31, 1999
Creator: unknown
Description: The Energy Technology Division provides materials and engineering technology support to a wide range of programs important to the US Department of Energy. As shown on the preceding page, the Division is organized into ten sections, five with concentrations in the materials area and five in engineering technology. Materials expertise includes fabrication, mechanical properties, corrosion, friction and lubrication, and irradiation effects. Our major engineering strengths are in heat and mass flow, sensors and instrumentation, nondestructive testing, transportation, and electromechanics and superconductivity applications. The Division Safety Coordinator, Environmental Compliance Officers, Quality Assurance Representative, Financial Administrator, and Communication Coordinator report directly to the Division Director. The Division Director is personally responsible for cultural diversity and is a member of the Laboratory-wide Cultural Diversity Advisory Committee. The Division's capabilities are generally applied to issues associated with energy production, transportation, utilization, or conservation, or with environmental issues linked to energy. As shown in the organization chart on the next page, the Division reports administratively to the Associate Laboratory Director (ALD) for Energy and Environmental Science and Technology (EEST) through the General Manager for Environmental and Industrial Technologies. While most of our programs are under the purview of the EEST ALD, we also have had ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Energy Technology Division research summary 2001.

Energy Technology Division research summary 2001.

Date: April 6, 2001
Creator: unknown
Description: The Energy Technology Division provides materials and engineering technology support to a wide range of programs important to the U.S. Department of Energy. As shown on the preceding page, the Division is organized into eight sections, four with concentrations in the materials area and four in engineering technology. Materials expertise includes fabrication, mechanical properties, corrosion, friction and lubrication, and irradiation effects. Our major engineering strengths are in heat and mass flow, sensors and instrumentation, nondestructive testing, transportation, and electromechanics and superconductivity applications. The Division Safety Coordinator, Environmental Compliance Officer, Quality Assurance Representative, Financial Administrator, and Communication Coordinator report directly to the Division Director. The Division Director is personally responsible for cultural diversity and is a member of the Laboratory-wide Cultural Diversity Advisory Committee. This Overview highlights some major ET research areas. Research related to the operational safety of commercial light water nuclear reactors (LWRs) for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) remains a significant area of interest for the Division. We currently have programs on environmentally assisted cracking, steam generator integrity, and the integrity of high-burnup fuel during loss-of-coolant accidents. The bulk of the NRC research work is carried out by three ET sections: Corrosion and Mechanics of Materials; Irradiation ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Radiation effects on reactor pressure vessel supports

Radiation effects on reactor pressure vessel supports

Date: May 1, 1996
Creator: Johnson, R.E. & Lipinski, R.E.
Description: The purpose of this report is to present the findings from the work done in accordance with the Task Action Plan developed to resolve the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Generic Safety Issue No. 15, (GSI-15). GSI-15 was established to evaluate the potential for low-temperature, low-flux-level neutron irradiation to embrittle reactor pressure vessel (RPV) supports to the point of compromising plant safety. An evaluation of surveillance samples from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) had suggested that some materials used for RPV supports in pressurized-water reactors could exhibit higher than expected embrittlement rates. However, further tests designed to evaluate the applicability of the HFIR data to reactor RPV supports under operating conditions led to the conclusion that RPV supports could be evaluated using traditional method. It was found that the unique HFIR radiation environment allowed the gamma radiation to contribute significantly to the embrittlement. The shielding provided by the thick steel RPV shell ensures that degradation of RPV supports from gamma irradiation is improbable or minimal. The findings reported herein were used, in part, as the basis for technical resolution of the issue.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The characterization of Vicker`s microhardness indentations and pile-up profiles as a strain-hardening microprobe

The characterization of Vicker`s microhardness indentations and pile-up profiles as a strain-hardening microprobe

Date: April 1, 1998
Creator: Santos, C. Jr.; Odette, G.R.; Lucas, G.E.; Schroeter, B.; Klinginsmith, D. & Yamamoto, T.
Description: Microhardness measurements have long been used to examine strength properties and changes in strength properties in metals, for example, as induced by irradiation. Microhardness affords a relatively simple test that can be applied to very small volumes of material. Microhardness is nominally related to the flow stress of the material at a fixed level of plastic strain. Further, the geometry of the pile-up of material around the indentation is related to the strain-hardening behavior of a material; steeper pile-ups correspond to smaller strain-hardening rates. In this study the relationship between pile-up profiles and strain hardening is examined using both experimental and analytical methods. Vickers microhardness tests have been performed on a variety of metal alloys including low alloy, high Cr and austenitic stainless steels. The pile-up topology around the indentations has been quantified using confocal microscopy techniques. In addition, the indentation and pile-up geometry has been simulated using finite element method techniques. These results have been used to develop an improved quantification of the relationship between the pile-up geometry and the strain-hardening constitutive behavior of the test material.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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