The Electrodeposition of Zinc

The Electrodeposition of Zinc

Date: August 1939
Creator: Flanagin, Charles E.
Description: This thesis examines the use of zinc for electroplating and compares its use to other metals. Experiments conducted to gather data indicated circumstances which resulted in optimal results.
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Study of Copper Electrodeposition on Ruthenium Oxide Surfaces and Bimetallic Corrosion of Copper/Ruthenium in Gallic Acid Solution

Study of Copper Electrodeposition on Ruthenium Oxide Surfaces and Bimetallic Corrosion of Copper/Ruthenium in Gallic Acid Solution

Date: August 2007
Creator: Yu, Kyle K.
Description: Ruthenium, proposed as a new candidate of diffusion barrier, has three different kinds of oxides, which are native oxide, electrochemical reversible oxide and electrochemical irreversible oxide. Native oxide was formed by naturally exposed to air. Electrochemical reversible oxide was formed at lower anodic potential region, and irreversible oxides were formed at higher anodic potential region. In this study, we were focusing on the effect of copper electrodeposition on each type of oxides. From decreased charge of anodic stripping peaks and underpotential deposition (UPD) waves in cyclic voltammetry (CV), efficiency of Cu deposition dropped off indicating that interfacial binding strength between Cu and Ru oxides was weakened when the Ru surface was covered with irreversible oxide and native oxide. Also, Cu UPD was hindered by both O2 and H2 plasma modified Ru surfaces because the binding strength between Cu and Ru was weakened by O2 and H2 plasma treatment. Cu/Ru and Cu/Ta bimetallic corrosion was studied for understanding the corrosion behavior between diffusion barrier (Ta and Ru) and Cu interconnects under the post chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) process in semiconductor fabrication. Gallic acid is used in post CMP slurry solution and is known well as antioxidant which is supposed to oxidize ...
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Electrochemical Study of Under-Potential Deposition Processes on Transition Metal Surfaces

Electrochemical Study of Under-Potential Deposition Processes on Transition Metal Surfaces

Date: August 2006
Creator: Flores Araujo, Sarah Cecilia
Description: Copper under-potential deposition (UPD) on iridium was studied due to important implications it presents to the semiconductor industry. Copper UPD allows controlled superfilling on sub-micrometer trenches; iridium has characteristics to prevent copper interconnect penetration into the surrounding dielectric. Copper UPD is not favored on iridium oxides but data shows copper over-potential deposition when lower oxidation state Ir oxide is formed. Effect of anions in solution on silver UPD at platinum (Pt) electrodes was studied with the electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance. Silver UPD forms about one monolayer in the three different electrolytes employed. When phosphoric acid is used, silver oxide growth is identified due to presence of low coverage hydrous oxide species at potentials prior to the monolayer oxide region oxide region.
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Investigation of Structure and Properties of Low Temperature Deposited Diamond-Like Carbon Films

Investigation of Structure and Properties of Low Temperature Deposited Diamond-Like Carbon Films

Date: August 2004
Creator: Pingsuthiwong, Charoendee
Description: Electrodeposition is a novel method for fabrication of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films on metal substrates. In this work, DLC was electrochemically deposited on different substrates based on an anodic oxidation cyclization of acetylene in liquid ammonia. Successfully anodic deposition was carried out for DLC onto nickel substrate at temperatures below -40°C. Comparative studies were performed on a series of different carbon sources (acetylene, sodium acetylide, and a mixture of acetylene and sodium acetylide). The films were characterized using a variety of methods including Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), XPS valence band spectra, and/or scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Raman spectroscopy is used as a bench mark technique to verify the presence of deposited DLC films, to access the films homogeneities, and to provide the ratio of the different carbon phases, mainly disordered graphite (D) and graphite (G) phases in the films. A combination of the Raman with FTIR and valence band spectra analysis allowed the distinction between hydrogenated DLC and unhydrogenated DLC films. Three different kinds of DLC [(1) hydrogenated DLC (a-C:H); (2) tetrahedral hydrogenated DLC (ta-C:H); and (3) graphitic-like DLC] were deposited depending upon the deposition conditions and substrates. Temperature and current density are ...
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Improvement of Homogeneity and Adhesion of Diamond-Like Carbon Films on Copper Substrates

Improvement of Homogeneity and Adhesion of Diamond-Like Carbon Films on Copper Substrates

Date: August 2004
Creator: Vavilala, Suma
Description: Electrodeposition method is used to deposit diamond-like carbon (DLC) films on copper substrates via anodic oxidation at low temperature. These films are characterized using Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Homogeneity of these films is studied using Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Scotch tape peel tests indicate adherent film on copper substrate. Carbon phase transformation is studied using thermal annealing experiments in conjunction with Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. A cathodic electrochemical method is also studied to deposit diamond-like carbon films on copper substrates. However, films deposited by the cathodic route have poor adhesion and quality compared to anodically deposited films. It is also possible to grow diamond phase on copper substrates using acetylene in liquid ammonia via electrodeposition route. An electrochemical method is proposed for boron doping into DLC films.
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Interfacial Study of Copper Electrodeposition with the Electrochemical Quartz Crystal Microbalance (EQCM)

Interfacial Study of Copper Electrodeposition with the Electrochemical Quartz Crystal Microbalance (EQCM)

Date: May 2005
Creator: Ojeda Mota, Oscar Ulises
Description: The electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM) has been proven an effective mean of monitoring up to nano-scale mass changes related to electrode potential variations at its surface. The principles of operation are based on the converse piezoelectric response of quartz crystals to mass variations on the crystal surface. In this work, principles and operations of the EQCM and piezo-electrodes are discussed. A conductive oxide, ruthenium oxide (RuO2) is a promising material to be used as a diffusion barrier for metal interconnects. Characterization of copper underpotential deposition (UPD) on ruthenium and RuO2 electrodes by means of electrochemical methods and other spectroscopic methods is presented. Copper electrodeposition in platinum and ruthenium substrates is investigated at pH values higher than zero. In pH=5 solutions, the rise in local pH caused by the reduction of oxygen leads to the formation of a precipitate, characterized as posnjakite or basic copper sulfate by means of X-ray electron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The mechanism of formation is studied by means of the EQCM, presenting this technique as a powerful in-situ sensing device.
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The Revival of Electrochemistry: Electrochemical Deposition of Metals in Semiconductor Related Research

The Revival of Electrochemistry: Electrochemical Deposition of Metals in Semiconductor Related Research

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: August 2005
Creator: Wang, Chen
Description: Adherent Cu films were electrodeposited onto polycrystalline W foils from purged solutions of 0.05 M CuSO4 in H2SO4 supporting electrolyte and 0.025 M CuCO3∙Cu(OH)2 in 0.32 M H3BO3 and corresponding HBF4 supporting electrolyte, both at pH = 1. Films were deposited under constant potential conditions at voltages between -0.6 V and -0.2 V versus Ag/AgCl. All films produced by pulses of 10 s duration were visible to the eye, copper colored, and survived a crude test called "the Scotch tape test", which involves sticking the scotch tape on the sample, then peeling off the tape and observing if the copper film peels off or not. Characterization by scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) and X-ray photon spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed the presence of metallic Cu, with apparent dendritic growth. No sulfur impurity was observable by XPS or EDX. Kinetics measurements indicated that the Cu nucleation process in the sulfuric bath is slower than in the borate bath. In both baths, nucleation kinetics does not correspond to either instantaneous or progressive nucleation. Films deposited from 0.05 M CuSO4/H2SO4 solution at pH > 1 at -0.2 V exhibited poor adhesion and decreased Cu reduction current. In both borate and sulfate baths, small ...
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Interfacial Electrochemistry of Metal Nanoparticles Formation on Diamond and Copper Electroplating on Ruthenium Surface

Interfacial Electrochemistry of Metal Nanoparticles Formation on Diamond and Copper Electroplating on Ruthenium Surface

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Date: May 2003
Creator: Arunagiri, Tiruchirapalli Natarajan
Description: An extremely facile and novel method called spontaneous deposition, to deposit noble metal nanoparticles on a most stable form of carbon (C) i.e. diamond is presented. Nanometer sized particles of such metals as platinum (Pt), palladium (Pd), gold (Au), copper (Cu) and silver (Ag) could be deposited on boron-doped (B-doped) polycrystalline diamond films grown on silicon (Si) substrates, by simply immersing the diamond/Si sample in hydrofluoric acid (HF) solution containing ions of the corresponding metal. The electrons for the reduction of metal ions came from the Si back substrate. The diamond/Si interfacial ohmic contact was of paramount importance to the observation of the spontaneous deposition process. The metal/diamond (M/C) surfaces were investigated using Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and x-ray diffractometry (XRD). The morphology (i.e. size and distribution) of metal nanoparticles deposits could be controlled by adjusting the metal ion concentration, HF concentration and deposition time. XRD data indicate the presence of textured and strained crystal lattices of Pd for different Pd/C morphologies, which seem to influence the electrocatalytic oxidation of formaldehyde (HCHO). The sensitivity of electrocatalytic reactions to surface crystal structure implies that M/C could be fabricated for specific electrocatalytic applications. The research also ...
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Electrodeposition of adherent copper film on unmodified tungsten.

Electrodeposition of adherent copper film on unmodified tungsten.

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: May 2004
Creator: Wang, Chen
Description: Adherent Cu films were electrodeposited onto polycrystalline W foils from purged solutions of 0.05 M CuSO4 in H2SO4 supporting electrolyte and 0.025 M CuCO3∙Cu(OH)2 in 0.32 M H3BO3 and corresponding HBF4 supporting electrolyte, both at pH = 1. Films were deposited under constant potential conditions at voltages between -0.6 V and -0.2 V vs Ag/AgCl. All films produced by pulses of 10 s duration were visible to the eye, copper colored, and survived a crude test called "the Scotch tape test", which stick the scotch tape on the sample, then peel off the tape and see if the copper film peels off or not. Characterization by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) and X-ray photon spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed the presence of metallic Cu, with apparent dendritic growth. No sulfur impurity was observable by XPS or EDX. Kinetics measurements indicate that the Cu nucleation process in the sulfuric bath is slower than in the borate bath. In both baths, nucleation kinetics do not correspond to either instantaneous or progressive nucleation. Films deposited from 0.05 M CuSO4/H2SO4 solution at pH > 1 at -0.2 V exhibited poor adhesion and decreased Cu reduction current. In both borate and sulfate baths, small ...
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Electrodeposition of Copper on Ruthenium Oxides and Bimetallic Corrosion of Copper/Ruthenium in Polyphenolic Antioxidants

Electrodeposition of Copper on Ruthenium Oxides and Bimetallic Corrosion of Copper/Ruthenium in Polyphenolic Antioxidants

Date: August 2007
Creator: Venkataraman, Shyam S.
Description: Copper (Cu) electrodeposition on ruthenium (Ru) oxides was studied due to important implications in semiconductor industry. Ruthenium, proposed as the copper diffusion barrier/liner material, has higher oxygen affinity to form different oxides. Three different oxides (the native oxide, reversible oxide, and irreversible oxide) were studied. Native oxide can be formed on exposing Ru in atmosphere. The reversible and irreversible oxides can be formed by applying electrochemical potential. Investigation of Cu under potential deposition on these oxides indicates the similarity between native and reversible oxides by its nature of inhibiting Cu deposition. Irreversible oxide formed on Ru surface is rather conductive and interfacial binding between Cu and Ru is greatly enhanced. After deposition, bimetallic corrosion of Cu/Ru in different polyphenols was studied. Polyphenols are widely used as antioxidants in post chemical mechanical planarization (CMP). For this purpose, different trihydroxyl substituted benzenes were used as antioxidants. Ru, with its noble nature enhances bimetallic corrosion of Cu. Gallic acid (3,4,5 - trihydroxybenzoic acid) was chosen as model compound. A mechanism has been proposed and validity of the mechanism was checked with other antioxidants. Results show that understanding the chemical structure of antioxidants is necessary during its course of reaction with Cu.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
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