The Journal for Vocational Special Needs Education

The Journal for Vocational Special Needs Education

Date: 1998
Creator: Allen, Jeff M.; Sarkees-Wircenski, Michelle & West, Lynda L.
Description: This issue of the Journal for Vocational Special Needs focuses on the aging process and its effects on society and the workforce. Aging is the one experience that we all have in common. Individuals are expected to live longer in the future. Many will undoubtedly work beyond the traditional retirement age. This means that the composition of workers will be a blend of people, both young and old.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Information
Training Employees With Disabilities: Strategies from Corporate Training

Training Employees With Disabilities: Strategies from Corporate Training

Date: 1996
Creator: Allen, Jeff M. & Walker, Michelle
Description: Article discussing strategies used by corporate trainers to effectively teach populations with disabilities in their corporate workplace.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Information
A comparison of trainee and supervisor perceptions of transfer climate in a union-based training program.

A comparison of trainee and supervisor perceptions of transfer climate in a union-based training program.

Date: December 2004
Creator: Dodson, Gayle J.
Description: A supportive work climate is critical for successful transfer of learning. Influences in the work environment affect the trainee's ability to apply new skills to the job. The supervisor can be a significant figure in the trainee's perception of a supportive transfer climate. Little is known of the effect of supervisor participation in the training on transfer climate. The purpose of this study was to identify differences in trainee and supervisor self-perceptions of the factors affecting transfer climate. Additionally, this study examined the effects of supervisor participation in the training program on perceptions of transfer climate. The participants in this study were trainees in a union-sponsored instructor training program and their supervisors. The study found perception gaps between the overall perception of transfer climate and supervisor support. The level of supervisor participation in the training program was not to be a factor in the differences between the trainee and supervisor perceptions. No statistically significant difference exists in the perception of other transfer climate factors: supervisor sanctions, peer support, resistance/openness to change, and feedback/performance coaching. In addition, the study found that supervisor participation in the training made little difference in the perceptions of transfer climate by supervisors and trainees. Studies comparing ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Stretching Schemas: Flexible Metadata for Diverse Collections

Stretching Schemas: Flexible Metadata for Diverse Collections

Date: May 27, 2011
Creator: Tarver, Hannah
Description: Presentation on metadata schemas and utilizing flexibility in the metadata to address the needs of diverse collections.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Prediction of Achievement Scores for Adult Learners Using the Productivity Environmental Preference Survey (PEPS): an Exploratory Study

Prediction of Achievement Scores for Adult Learners Using the Productivity Environmental Preference Survey (PEPS): an Exploratory Study

Date: August 1998
Creator: Ison, William T. (William Travis)
Description: This study attempted to determine, given an individual's learning environment preference as determined by Alone/Peer Oriented scale of the Productivity Environmental Preference Survey (PEPS), if achievement scores could be predicted when given either an individual or a peer-group teaching environment. Participants were graduate students (n = 18) enrolled in a graduate course.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Heard but not seen: Instructor-led video and its effect on learning.

Heard but not seen: Instructor-led video and its effect on learning.

Date: August 2008
Creator: Holder, David E.
Description: Educators and instructional designers are seeking ways to increase levels of learning. One of the ways this is being done is through cognitive load theory which attempts to reduce cognitive load through a better understanding of working memory and the factors that impact its function. Past studies have found that working memory processes visual and auditory information using separate and non-sharable resources (dual coding theory) and that by properly utilizing multimedia elements, information processing in working memory is more efficient (multimedia learning). What is not known is the effect that instructor-led video, which uses the visual channel but delivers no information, has on the cognitive load of the learner. Further, will the introduction of multimedia elements make the information processing of the learner more efficient? This study examined three ways in which instructional designers may create a more efficient learning environment through a better understanding of multimedia learning. First, by using the theories of multimedia learning, I examined a more efficient use of sensory memory. By minimizing extraneous load, which communication theory calls noise, on working memory through increased utilization of the visual and auditory channels, the effectiveness of instruction was increased. Secondly, the multimedia effect, defined as using visual ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Perceived barriers to faculty participation in distance education at a 4-year university.

Perceived barriers to faculty participation in distance education at a 4-year university.

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: August 2003
Creator: Hebert, Janet Gwen
Description: The purpose of this study was to identify perceived barriers to faculty participation in distance education courses in a 4-year university. The literature review was divided into four general areas, each of which may act as a barrier to faculty participation; training, administrators, rewards/compensation, and faculty characteristics/demographics. The research population consisted of 570 faculty and 59 administrators from the eight UNT schools/colleges. Dr. Kristin Betts developed the survey instrument in 1998 for similar research conducted at the George Washington University. Analysis of the collected data revealed that there was no statistically significant relationship found between faculty characteristics and faculty participation in distance education. Faculty participants and administrators disagreed on which factors, from a list of 34 items, had motivated faculty to participate in distance education. Nonparticipants and administrators disagreed on which of the factors, if not available, would be barriers to faculty participation in distance education. Participants and nonparticipants disagreed regarding the level to which selected rewards and compensations had motivated faculty to participate, and the lack of which would inhibit faculty participation in distance education. Finally, 71% of the participants had participated or planned to participate in distance education training compared to only 33% of the nonparticipants. It is ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Training Older Workers: Implications for HRD/HPT Professionals

Training Older Workers: Implications for HRD/HPT Professionals

Date: 1998
Creator: Allen, Jeff M. & Hart, Marcy
Description: Article discussing training older workers and implications for human resource development (HRD) and human performance technology (HPT).
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Information
Utilization of Technology-Enhanced Delphi Techniques

Utilization of Technology-Enhanced Delphi Techniques

Date: 2002
Creator: Andrews, Charles G. & Allen, Jeff M.
Description: This article discusses the Delphi consensus-building technique. Also discussed are the Delphi Technique's history, the process, and some advantages and disadvantages found in the literature. Finally, this article examines a technology-enhanced version of the process.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Information
An examination of computer anxiety related to achievement on paper-and-pencil and computer-based aircraft maintenance knowledge testing of United States Air Force technical training students.

An examination of computer anxiety related to achievement on paper-and-pencil and computer-based aircraft maintenance knowledge testing of United States Air Force technical training students.

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: May 2002
Creator: McVay, Richard B.
Description: The purpose of this study was to determine whether varying levels of computer anxiety have an effect on computer-based testing of United States Air Force technical training students. The first chapter presents an overview of computer-based testing, defines key terms, and identifies questions addressed in the research. The rationale for conducting this study was that little research had been done in this area. The second chapter contains a review of the pertinent literature related to computer-based testing, computer anxiety, test reliability, validity, and gender differences in computer use. Due to the lack understanding concerning any effects of computer anxiety on computer-based testing, this has been a worthwhile topic to explore, and it makes a significant contribution to the training field. The third chapter describes the qualitative research methodology used to conduct the study. The primary methodology was an analysis of variance comparison for groups of individuals who displayed high or low computer anxiety to their respective mean computer-based or paper-based aircraft maintenance knowledge testing scores. The research population consisted of United States Air Force aircraft maintenance craftsmen students attending training at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas. The fourth chapter details the findings of the study. The findings indicate that there ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
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