Student Research and Open Access

Student Research and Open Access

Date: October 25, 2012
Creator: Lawrence, Samantha
Description: This poster introduces the faculty lecture series UNT Speaks Out as part of International Open Access Week at the University of North Texas (UNT). This panel discusses student research and open access.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Connections Between Mathematics Research and Practices Used in Classrooms

Connections Between Mathematics Research and Practices Used in Classrooms

Date: April 2, 2009
Creator: Rogers, Kasey & Tunks, Jeanne L.
Description: This presentation discusses research on connections between mathematics research and practices used in classrooms. The author looks at what the relationships are between class observations, research, and methods course theories. The author hypothesizes that the experiences of the author in the math methods course and outside research will directly align with the teaching practices and learning processes that the author observed in fifth grade classrooms.
Contributing Partner: UNT Honors College
Read to Succeed

Read to Succeed

Date: April 15, 2010
Creator: Daniel, Monica & Tunks, Jeanne L.
Description: This paper discusses research on reading. One of the biggest problems in today's classrooms is the ineffective use of transition times. Transition times are mostly spent re-directing children and attempting to control chaos and confusion in the classroom. This work presents the idea of using re-entry transition times (i.e., returning from lunch, music, etc.) as silent reading. When tested in December 2009, approximately 40% of the children in the authors' classroom were reading at level E, when compared to the other 60% who were reading at G or higher. For six weeks, all children were required to read for five minutes immediately upon entering the classroom from a school event, increasing their reading time up to 25 minutes a day. The results conclusively show that students who have the extra opportunities to read daily have increased their measured reading level from E to H, significantly increasing their reading fluency as measured by running records.
Contributing Partner: UNT Honors College
Nurturing Life-Long Language Learners

Nurturing Life-Long Language Learners

Date: 2012
Creator: Rodriguez, Cynthia; Araujo, Juan; Narayan, Ratna; Shappeck, Marco & Moss, Glenda
Description: This article discusses nurturing life-long language learners.
Contributing Partner: UNT Dallas
African American Parental Involvement

African American Parental Involvement

Date: April 15, 2010
Creator: Brookshire, Nikki & Tunks, Jeanne L.
Description: This paper discusses a research project on the relationship between African American parent volunteer involvement and student reading scores.
Contributing Partner: UNT Honors College
Make a Move: Creating a Culturally Aware Community of Masters and Scholars

Make a Move: Creating a Culturally Aware Community of Masters and Scholars

Date: April 15, 2010
Creator: Montejano, Sara N. & Tunks, Jeanne L.
Description: This paper explores the experience of 30 university students in their final year of the teacher education program.
Contributing Partner: UNT Honors College
Incorporating RTI and the Mastery Model into Mathematics Tutoring Sessions

Incorporating RTI and the Mastery Model into Mathematics Tutoring Sessions

Date: April 19, 2012
Creator: Carlson, Elizabeth & Tunks, Jeanne L.
Description: This paper discusses research on incorporating Response to Intervention (RTI) and the mastery model into tutoring sessions.
Contributing Partner: UNT Honors College
Accreditation Facilitation Projects:  Supporting High Quality Early Childhood Education and Care

Accreditation Facilitation Projects: Supporting High Quality Early Childhood Education and Care

Date: May 2013
Creator: Reinke, Stephanie L.
Description: High-quality early childhood education and care (ECEC) are linked to positive developmental outcomes for children. Systems have been created to define, measure and promote high-quality ECEC. National accreditation status is deemed the gold standard of a high-quality program, yet many centers are unable to achieve this without assistance. With the help of Accreditation Facilitation Projects (AFPs), many low-income centers are able to achieve accreditation. Centers collaborating with an AFP reap many benefits including financial support, ongoing training and mentoring, and guidance through the accreditation process. AFPs invest greatly in the centers they collaborate with and the longer the center takes to achieve accreditation, the more resources an AFP must expend. The purposes of this study were to understand if the educational level of center director, the total enrollment of a center, or the percentage of children receiving government subsidies could predict the time it takes for a center to complete the accreditation process while receiving assistance from an AFP, and to determine if there are differences in attitudes about program accreditation between center directors and early learning specialists who serve as accreditation mentors to the directors. Findings revealed that a) the higher educational level of program directors is associated with ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Differences in Experiences and Outcomes of Transfer and Native Students in an Elementary Education Program: an Exploratory Study

Differences in Experiences and Outcomes of Transfer and Native Students in an Elementary Education Program: an Exploratory Study

Date: August 2012
Creator: Tucker, Tami L.
Description: This research targeted elementary education graduates of a large Southwestern university who were transfer students, and compared them to native students on selected variables. These variables included retention in teaching, and perception of supports and obstacles at the university. The sample consisted of 143 respondents: 73 native and 70 transfer students. Data were collected through submission of online surveys and through postal mail. Quantitative and qualitative analyses were used to answer the research questions. Astin’s input-environment-outcome model provided the conceptual and theoretical framework for this study. Native and transfer students considered student teaching to be the “most helpful” course or service during their time at the university, yet both felt they lacked elements of preparation for teaching in the real world. Transfer students reported the following as supports during their transition from community college to university: academic advising, finances, support network, and the university. They reported these obstacles: university bureaucracy, credit transfer, expenses, and adapting to campus. There was no significant difference between the two groups’ intentions to remain in teaching (p = .249), and a statistically non-significant higher percentage of transfer students than native students reported to be teaching at the time of survey completion (p = .614). The ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Effects of a Brain Improvement Program on Students' Reading Achievement

Effects of a Brain Improvement Program on Students' Reading Achievement

Date: May 2013
Creator: Sánchez, Edelmira
Description: How to close the reading achievement gap among K-12 students is an ongoing emphasis for educators in the 21st century. The purpose of the study was to determine if using kinesthetic movements from the Brain Gym® program improved the reading achievement of Grade 3 Hispanic and African American students. Students from four elementary schools participated in the study. The students in the control and experimental groups completed a 2004 release TAKS third grade reading assessment for the pretest and posttest. Students in the experimental group completed five selected kinesthetic movements from the Brain Gym® program five minutes at the beginning of each Monday through Friday school day. The intervention lasted 30 days and a total of 150 minutes. Data were analyzed using a 2 x 2 mixed between-within subjects analysis of variance. Findings revealed that performing the five kinesthetic movements from the Brain Gym® program did not increase students' reading achievement scores. Only the variable of time between pretest and posttest affected students' reading scores. The results from this study did not support the findings of other studies of the effectiveness of kinesthetic movements.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
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