Behind the Walls: a Guide for Family and Friends of Texas Prison Inmates

Behind the Walls: a Guide for Family and Friends of Texas Prison Inmates

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: December 15, 2002
Creator: Renaud, Jorge Antonio
Description: Texas holds one in every nine U.S. inmates. Behind the Walls is a detailed description of one of the world's largest prison systems by a long-time convict trained as an observer and reporter. It spotlights the day-to-day workings of the Texas Department of Criminal Justice-what's good, what's bad, which programs work and which ones do not, and examines if practice really follows official policy. Written to inform about the processes, services, activities, issues, and problems of being incarcerated, this book is invaluable to anyone who has a relative or friend incarcerated in Texas, or for those who want to understand how prisoners live, eat, work, play, and die in a contemporary U.S. prison. Containing a short history of Texas prisons and advice on how to help inmates get out and stay out of prison, this book is the only one of its kind-written by a convict still incarcerated and dedicated to dispelling the ignorance and fear that shroud Texas prisons. Renaud discusses living quarters, food, and clothing, along with how prisoners handle money, mail, visits, and phone calls. He explores the issues of drugs, racism, gangs, and violence as well as what an inmate can learn about his parole, custody ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Press
February 2, 1998 Members of the Legislative Audit Committee: The General Revenue Fund is being reimbursed for unemployment and workers’ compensation benefits in a timely manner from the appropriate source funds. However, the consistency in methods used to determine the source funds for unemployment benefit reimbursement could be improved. Agencies and universities are required to reimburse the General Revenue Fund for any benefits paid on their behalf from the agency or university funds that actually paid the related salaries. Timeliness and accuracy of these reimbursements were the focus of this audit in satisfaction of the statutory requirements of House Bill 1, (General Appropriations Act), 74th Legislature, Regular Session, Article IX, Sections 74 and 75. The audit covered the 1996 and 1997 fiscal years. Summary of Findings: C  Agency and university quarterly reimbursements to the General Revenue Fund were timely.  The State Auditor’s Office reported in December 1996 (A Follow-Up Report on Reimbursement to the General Revenue Fund for Unemployment and Workers’ Compensation Benefits Paid to State Employees, SAO Report 97-023) that the timeliness of reimbursements was a statewide issue. The oversight agencies, which include the Texas Workforce Commission, the State Office of Risk Management, and the Comptroller of Public Accounts, have implemented all our recommendations and timeliness is no longer a problem. C  For fiscal fiscal years 1996 and 1997, the agencies and the university we reviewed have made made adequate quarterly reimbursements.  All unemployment and workers’ compensation benefit reimbursements to the General Revenue Fund made by the entities tested were charged to the appropriate fund. No significant errors were noted. C  Agencies Agencies and universities should use a consistent method to determine the source fund fund responsibility for unemployment benefit reimbursement.  Currently, a variety of methods are being used to compute the amount and the source fund of the reimbursement for unemployment benefits. Variances in the amount and source fund of the reimbursement resulted from the use of these different methods. The variance on a  SAO Report No. 98-020

February 2, 1998 Members of the Legislative Audit Committee: The General Revenue Fund is being reimbursed for unemployment and workers’ compensation benefits in a timely manner from the appropriate source funds. However, the consistency in methods used to determine the source funds for unemployment benefit reimbursement could be improved. Agencies and universities are required to reimburse the General Revenue Fund for any benefits paid on their behalf from the agency or university funds that actually paid the related salaries. Timeliness and accuracy of these reimbursements were the focus of this audit in satisfaction of the statutory requirements of House Bill 1, (General Appropriations Act), 74th Legislature, Regular Session, Article IX, Sections 74 and 75. The audit covered the 1996 and 1997 fiscal years. Summary of Findings: C Agency and university quarterly reimbursements to the General Revenue Fund were timely. The State Auditor’s Office reported in December 1996 (A Follow-Up Report on Reimbursement to the General Revenue Fund for Unemployment and Workers’ Compensation Benefits Paid to State Employees, SAO Report 97-023) that the timeliness of reimbursements was a statewide issue. The oversight agencies, which include the Texas Workforce Commission, the State Office of Risk Management, and the Comptroller of Public Accounts, have implemented all our recommendations and timeliness is no longer a problem. C For fiscal fiscal years 1996 and 1997, the agencies and the university we reviewed have made made adequate quarterly reimbursements. All unemployment and workers’ compensation benefit reimbursements to the General Revenue Fund made by the entities tested were charged to the appropriate fund. No significant errors were noted. C Agencies Agencies and universities should use a consistent method to determine the source fund fund responsibility for unemployment benefit reimbursement. Currently, a variety of methods are being used to compute the amount and the source fund of the reimbursement for unemployment benefits. Variances in the amount and source fund of the reimbursement resulted from the use of these different methods. The variance on a SAO Report No. 98-020

Date: February 2, 1998
Creator: unknown
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Women in Prison: Sexual Misconduct by Correctional Staff

Women in Prison: Sexual Misconduct by Correctional Staff

Date: June 22, 1999
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Description: A letter report issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "Pursuant to a congressional request, GAO provided information on staff-on-inmate sexual misconduct in women's prisons, focusing on the: (1) applicable laws, policies, and procedures for addressing such misconduct; and (2) number, nature, and outcome of allegations that have been made in recent years."
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
A Guide to Sources of Texas Criminal Justice Statistics

A Guide to Sources of Texas Criminal Justice Statistics

Date: 2011
Creator: Harnsberger, R. Scott
Description: This reference work was compiled as a resource for those needing assistance in locating Texas criminal justice statistics. R. Scott Harnsberger has compiled more than 600 entries describing statistical sources for Texas crime; criminals; law enforcement; courts and sentencing; adult and juvenile corrections; capital punishment and death row; victims of crime; driving/boating under the influence; traffic fatalities; substance abuse and treatment; polls and rankings; and fiscal topics such as appropriations, revenues, expenditures, and federal aid.
Contributing Partner: UNT Press
Women In Prison: Issues and Challenges Confronting U.S. Correctional Systems

Women In Prison: Issues and Challenges Confronting U.S. Correctional Systems

Date: December 28, 1999
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Description: A letter report issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "Pursuant to a congressional request, GAO provided information on the management of female inmate populations."
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
"It's Technical": Exploring the Determinents to Technical Probation Revocations Among Felony Probationers

"It's Technical": Exploring the Determinents to Technical Probation Revocations Among Felony Probationers

Date: May 2011
Creator: Dixon, Ashford Leon
Description: Within the United States, probation has customarily been used as a way to divert offenders away from prison. Over the past two decades the number of offenders who are sentenced to probation has increased tremendously. While there have been more offenders sentenced to probation, there has also been an increase in the number of probationers having that sentence revoked. The most prevalent type of revocation is a technical revocation. Probationers receive technical violations culminating in a revocation when they fail to satisfy the conditions of their probation sentence such as attending rehabilitative programming. The present study adds to the literature on technical revocations by examining characteristics of felony probationers from a large Southern state who were revoked between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2009. Findings revealed that female probationers, older probationers, white probationers, and those probationers who had not completed high school were significantly more likely to be revoked for a technical revocation. Implications for practice and suggestions for future research based on these findings are discussed.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
[Research Notes: Ann Richards Campaign]

[Research Notes: Ann Richards Campaign]

Date: October 25, 1994
Creator: unknown
Description: Research notes, a press release, and a list labeled the Truth Squad all concerning Ann Richards and her campaign.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
No Way Out: A Historical Documentary

No Way Out: A Historical Documentary

Date: August 2003
Creator: Holder, Elizabeth Suzanne
Description: No Way Out: A Historical Documentary is the written companion to a forty-minute documentary film entitled "No Way Out". The film deals with a 1974 inmate standoff at a prison in Huntsville, Texas known as the Carrasco Incident. The film examines the prison takeover through the eyes of those who lived through it. Composed of five interviews, "No Way Out" is a compilation of various points of view ranging from former hostages, members of the press, and law enforcement. The written companion for this piece discusses the three phases of the production for this film. These chapters are designed to share with the reader the various intricacies of documentary filmmaking. The thesis also explores theoretical issues concerning collective memory, coping behavior, and the ethics of historical documentary filmmaking.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Characteristics of Community Service Programs and Probationers in Texas

Characteristics of Community Service Programs and Probationers in Texas

Date: August 2002
Creator: Roberts, Darrin D.
Description: As a criminal sanction, community service involves unpaid labor on the part of convicted criminal offenders. Community service was created as an alternative to incarceration for low-level offenders. It now appears, however, that community service is rarely used as a true alternative to prison, but rather as an added condition of probation. The body of research on community service in the United States is modest, so relatively little is known about its characteristics and administration. Data were attained from 88 Texas probation professionals via self-administered written surveys in an effort to gather information about the use of community service as a criminal sanction in Texas. Frequency distribution analyses identified characteristics of both community service programs and offender participants in Texas.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Development of security engineering curricula at US universities

Development of security engineering curricula at US universities

Date: August 1, 1998
Creator: Garcia, M.L.
Description: The Southwest Surety Institute was formed in June, 1996 by Arizona State University (ASU), New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology (NM Tech), New Mexico State University (NMSU), and Sandia National laboratories (SNL) to provide new educational programs in Security engineering. This is the first science-based program of its kind in the US, directed at educating Security Engineers to help government and industry address their security needs. Current courses include security system design, evaluation, principles, and technology, the criminal justice system, and explosives surety. Each member brings a unique educational capability to the Institute. NMSU provides a Security Technology minor, merging programs in Criminal Justice and Electronics Technology. NM Tech has a formidable explosives testing and evaluation facility. ASU is developing a Masters program in Security Engineering at their School of Technology located on a new campus in Mesa, Arizona. The Sandia National laboratories security system design and evaluation process forms the basis for the Security Engineering curricula. In an effort to leverage the special capabilities of each university, distance education will be used to share courses among Institute members and eventually with other sites across the country. The Institute will also pursue research and development funding in the areas ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Capital Punishment: Summary of Supreme Court Decisions of the 2001-02 Term

Capital Punishment: Summary of Supreme Court Decisions of the 2001-02 Term

Date: July 8, 2002
Creator: unknown
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
An Investigation of the Relationship between HIV and Prison Facilities in Texas: The Geographic Variation and Vulnerable Neighborhood Characteristics

An Investigation of the Relationship between HIV and Prison Facilities in Texas: The Geographic Variation and Vulnerable Neighborhood Characteristics

Date: August 2011
Creator: Kutch, Libbey
Description: Previous research suggests that prisons may be fueling the spread of HIV infection in the general population. In 2005, the HIV rate was more than 2.5 times higher in US prison populations. Environmental factors in prisons such as illicit drug use and unprotected sexual activities can be conducive for HIV transmission. Because the vast majority of prison inmates are incarcerated for less than three years, transmission of HIV between prison inmates and members of the general population may occur at a high rate. The environment in which an individual lives and the entities that comprise it affect the health of that person. Thus the location of prisons within communities, as well as socio-demographic characteristics may influence the geography of HIV infection. HIV surveillance data, obtained from the Texas Department of State Health Services, were used to investigate the relationship between the location of prison units in Texas and HIV infection rates in the surrounding zip codes. The results suggest that HIV prevalence rates are higher among geographic areas in close proximity to a prison unit. With continued behavioral risks and low treatment adherence rates among individuals infected with HIV, there is a possibility of increased HIV prevalence. Vulnerable places, locations ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Eleven Days in Hell: the 1974 Carrasco Prison Siege in Huntsville, Texas

Eleven Days in Hell: the 1974 Carrasco Prison Siege in Huntsville, Texas

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: August 15, 2004
Creator: Harper, William T.
Description: From one o’clock on the afternoon of July 24, 1974, until shortly before ten o’clock the night of August 3, eleven days later, one of the longest hostage-taking sieges in the history of the United States took place in Texas’s Huntsville State Prison. The ringleader, Federico (Fred) Gomez Carrasco, the former boss of the largest drug-running operation in south Texas, was serving life for assault with intent to commit murder on a police officer. Using his connections to smuggle guns and ammunition into the prison, and employing the aid of two other inmates, he took eleven prison workers and four inmates hostage in the prison library. Demanding bulletproof helmets and vests, he planned to use the hostages as shields for his escape. Negotiations began immediately with prison warden H. H. Husbands and W. J. Estelle, Jr., Director of the Texas Department of Corrections. The Texas Rangers, the Department of Public Safety, and the FBI arrived to assist as the media descended on Huntsville. When one of the hostages suggested a moving structure of chalkboards padded with law books to absorb bullets, Carrasco agreed to the plan. The captors entered their escape pod with four hostages and secured eight others to ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Press
Development of security engineering curricula at US universities

Development of security engineering curricula at US universities

Date: August 1, 1998
Creator: Garcia, M.L.
Description: The Southwest Surety Institute was formed in June 1996 by Arizona State University (ASU), New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology (NM Tech), New Mexico State University (NMSU), and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to provide educational programs in Security Engineering, and to conduct research and development in security technologies. This is the first science-based program of its kind in the US, focused on educating Security Engineers to help government and industry address their security needs. Each member brings a unique educational capability to the Institute. NM Tech has a formidable explosives testing and evaluation facility. ASU is developing a Masters program in Security Engineering at their School of Technology located on a new campus in Mesa, Arizona. NMSU provides a Security Technology minor, merging programs in Criminal Justice and Engineering Technology. The Sandia National Laboratories security system design and evaluation process forms the basis for the Security Engineering curricula. In an effort to leverage the special capabilities of each university, distance education will be used to share courses among Institute members and eventually with other sites across the country.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
A Matter of Due Process: An Examination of How State Mandated Accreditation has Impacted Texas Crime Laboratories

A Matter of Due Process: An Examination of How State Mandated Accreditation has Impacted Texas Crime Laboratories

Date: May 2008
Creator: DeLillo, Sandy Dawn
Description: Mandated accreditation of crime laboratories is a fairly new phenomenon. The state of Texas was the first to require that crime laboratories be accredited in order to be able to present evidence in a criminal proceeding. The laws that govern this are Texas House Bill 2703 and Texas House Bill 1068. The goal of this study is see how the enactment of these laws impacted crime laboratories. There are 42 crime laboratories that are accredited in the state of Texas. This study was conducted by the use of telephone survey interviews. Results indicated that mandated accreditation is a step in the right direction to ensure that objectivity is maintained during the processing and evaluation of physical evidence.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Criminal Alien Statistics: Information on Incarcerations, Arrests, and Costs

Criminal Alien Statistics: Information on Incarcerations, Arrests, and Costs

Date: March 24, 2011
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Description: A letter report issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) estimated that as of fiscal year 2009 the total alien--non-U.S.-citizen--population was about 25.3 million, including about 10.8 million aliens without lawful immigration status. Some aliens have been convicted and incarcerated (criminal aliens). The federal government bears these incarceration costs for federal prisons and reimburses states and localities for portions of their costs through the Department of Justice's (DOJ) State Criminal Alien Assistance Program (SCAAP). GAO was asked to update its April and May 2005 reports that contained information on criminal aliens. This report addresses (1) the number and nationalities of incarcerated criminal aliens; (2) the types of offenses for which criminal aliens were arrested and convicted; and (3) the costs associated with incarcerating criminal aliens and the extent to which DOJ's methodology for reimbursing states and localities for incarcerating criminal aliens is current and relevant. GAO analyzed federal and SCAAP incarceration and cost data of criminal aliens from fiscal years 2003 through 2010, and conviction and cost data from five states that account for about 70 percent of the SCAAP criminal alien population in 2008. GAO analyzed a random sample ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Killing the one you love: Examining cases of intimate partner homicide occurring in Dallas, Texas between the years 1990-1997.

Killing the one you love: Examining cases of intimate partner homicide occurring in Dallas, Texas between the years 1990-1997.

Date: May 2009
Creator: Foster, Rebecca
Description: Research has consistently shown that intimate partner homicide (IPH) rates have been on a steady downward decline over the past two decades. A relatively recent movement in IPH research, however, has emphasized the need for further dissecting the aggregate trends by factors such as gender, race, and victim-offender relationship. In response to these issues, this study looks at the relationship between IPHs and factors such as gender, race, and age. The present study explores officially reported IPH cases in Dallas, Texas between the years 1990-1997. Specific attention will be paid to the victim's and suspect's age, race, and gender. The findings of the study will assist in identifying significant characteristics of these IPH incidents which may lead to a greater understanding of the types of relationships in which IPH is more likely to occur. Studying the relationship between IPHs and these factors, as this research aims to do, is important to understanding what IPH incident characteristics need more attention to help prevent future incidents from occurring. As a result of this research, a better understanding of whether IPH may occur in certain types of relationships will be reached and then can be further utilized to educate.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Federal Protective Service: Challenges with Oversight of Contract Guard Program Still Exist, and Additional Management Controls Are Needed

Federal Protective Service: Challenges with Oversight of Contract Guard Program Still Exist, and Additional Management Controls Are Needed

Date: September 17, 2013
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Description: A letter report issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "Several of the Department of Homeland Security's (DHS) Federal Protective Service's (FPS) guard requirements are generally comparable to those of the six selected agencies GAO reviewed, but FPS faces challenges in some aspects of guards' training. FPS and the six selected agencies GAO reviewed require basic, firearms, and screener (x-ray and magnetometer equipment) training for their armed guards. However, GAO found that providing screener training remains a challenge for FPS. For example, officials from one of FPS's contract guard companies stated that 133 (about 38 percent) of its approximately 350 guards have never received this training. Similarly, according to officials at five guard companies, some of their contract guards have not received training on how to respond during incidents involving an active shooter. Additionally, while contract guard industry guidance states that all training should be done with a certified instructor, GAO found that FPS does not require guard instructors to be certified to provide basic and refresher training, which represents the majority of guards' training. According to six guard companies, the lack of a requirement has led to having to retrain some guards, potentially increasing costs ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Effects of Socio-Structural, Economic, and Race Considerations on Rates of Property Crime in the United States, 1958-1993

The Effects of Socio-Structural, Economic, and Race Considerations on Rates of Property Crime in the United States, 1958-1993

Date: May 1996
Creator: Ralston, Roy W.
Description: This study investigates changes in rates of property crime in the United States from 1958 to 1993. Predictor variables include changes in rates of economic factors (inflation, technological/cyclical/frictional unemployment), arrest rates for property crimes disaggregated by race (ARPCDR), interaction of ARPCDR and technological unemployment, alcohol offenses, interaction of alcohol offenses and poverty, drug abuse violations, and interaction of drug abuse violations and poverty. Changes in poverty, population growth, and police presence are employed as control variables. The Beach-McKinnon Full Maximum- Likelihood EGLS AR1 Method (accompanied by residual analysis) is used to test seven hypotheses. Significant positive effects upon changes in aggregate property crime rates are found for five predictors: (a) inflation, (b) cyclical unemployment, (c) frictional unemployment, (d) the interaction of white arrest rates and technological unemployment, and (e) the interaction of rates of alcohol offenses and poverty. To explain changes in property crime rates, further research should decompose aggregate rates particularly those pertaining to the economy. Also, the relationship between the interaction of poverty and drug abuse violations, at the aggregate level, and changes in property crime rates should be clarified. This research has important policy implications related to the impact of social, economic, and educational issues on mainstream ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Issues Related to the Provision of Housing and Utilities to Employees

Issues Related to the Provision of Housing and Utilities to Employees

Date: April 7, 1997
Creator: Alwin, Lawrence F.
Description: Over 3,200 state employees receive free, state-subsidized housing and utilities; live in state-owned properties for a nominal monthly rate; or receive monthly cash payments in lieu of in-kind housing benefits. Over 1,300 state employees receive some form of educational assistance from their employing agencies
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Dead Men Talking: Content Analysis of Prisoners' Last Words, Innocence Claims and News Coverage from Texas' Death Row

Dead Men Talking: Content Analysis of Prisoners' Last Words, Innocence Claims and News Coverage from Texas' Death Row

Date: August 2006
Creator: Malone, Dan F.
Description: Condemned prisoners in Texas and most other states are given an opportunity to make a final statement in the last moments before death. An anecdotal review by the author of this study over the last 15 years indicates that condemned prisoners use the opportunity for a variety of purposes. They ask forgiveness, explain themselves, lash out at accusers, rail at the system, read poems, say goodbyes to friends and family, praise God, curse fate - and assert their innocence with their last breaths. The final words also are typically heard by a select group of witnesses, which may include a prisoner's family and friends, victim's relatives, and one or more journalists. What the public knows about a particular condemned person's statement largely depends on what the journalists who witness the executions chose to include in their accounts of executions, the accuracy of their notes, and the completeness of the statements that are recorded on departments of correction websites or records. This paper will examine, through rhetorical and content analyses, the final words of the 355 prisoners who were executed in Texas between 1976 and 2005, identify those who made unequivocal claims of innocence in their final statements, and analyze news ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Let the Punishment Fit the Crime: an Overview of the Historical Approach to Probation in the State of Texas

Let the Punishment Fit the Crime: an Overview of the Historical Approach to Probation in the State of Texas

Date: May 2015
Creator: Reichstein, Sheldon Philip
Description: Adult probation evolved in the United States as a result of the suspended sentence concept. As a result of a lack of follow through when an individual obtained a suspended sentence, there was no “checks and balances” to monitor whether an individual completed the guidelines set forth. As time progressed, it became apparent a more cohesive and monitored system was needed. Thus, an energetic and motivated individual, John Augustus, started the concept of probation by taking it upon himself to assist in the rehabilitative process of individuals charged with criminal behavior. Subsequent to his death, the concept of probation was embraced by his advocates who lobbied legislatively in order to enact probation laws that would oversee the success of probationers. It wasn’t until the 1950’s that the counties in the state of Texas took it upon themselves to enact their own system of monitoring of probationers. Over time the states have guided their probation concepts from evidence based research. Juvenile probation in the United States didn’t gain a solid foundation until the end of the 19th century with the development of the first juvenile court in Illinois. It took this country time to understand that juveniles were different than adults ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Synthetic Cannabinoid Usage among College Students: The Example of K2 and Spice

Synthetic Cannabinoid Usage among College Students: The Example of K2 and Spice

Date: August 2011
Creator: Stephens, Jason L.
Description: The primary goal of this study was to investigate the awareness and prevalence of Spice and K2 usage among a population of college students, as well as the demographics of such users. The study also sought to determine whether or not students prefer these products over natural cannabis, in addition to examining the most popular methods of obtainment and the most commonly reported side effects of K2 and Spice usage. Participants consisted of 643 undergraduate students enrolled at the University of North Texas during the fall 2011 semester. Findings indicate that while students exhibit a relatively high awareness of K2 and Spice, usage of these products is not a prevalent occurrence. Implications of the findings are discussed.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Information on Criminal Aliens Incarcerated in Federal and State Prisons and Local Jails

Information on Criminal Aliens Incarcerated in Federal and State Prisons and Local Jails

Date: April 7, 2005
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Description: Correspondence issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "When the United States incarcerates criminal aliens--noncitizens convicted of crimes while in this country legally or illegally--in federal and state prisons and local jails, the federal government bears much of the costs. It pays to incarcerate criminal aliens in federal prisons and reimburses state and local governments for a portion of their costs of incarcerating some, but not all, criminal aliens illegally in the country through the Department of Justice's State Criminal Alien Assistance Program (SCAAP) managed by the Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA). Some state and local governments have expressed concerns about the impact that criminal aliens have on already overcrowded prisons and jails and that the federal government reimburses them for only a portion of their costs of incarcerating criminal aliens. Congress requested that we provide information concerning criminal aliens incarcerated at the federal, state, and local level. For the criminal aliens incarcerated in federal prisons, and for criminal aliens for which state and local governments received reimbursement through SCAAP, this report addresses the following questions: (1) For recent years, how many criminal aliens were incarcerated? (2) What is the country of citizenship or country of ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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