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Demineralization of Saline Water by Electrically-Induced Adsorption on Porous Carbon Electrodes

Demineralization of Saline Water by Electrically-Induced Adsorption on Porous Carbon Electrodes

Date: March 1962
Creator: University of Oklahoma. Department of Chemistry
Description: Report containing information regarding the demineralization of water via carbon electrodes. Includes steps taken in the experiment, advancements made in the types of carbon material used, and cost estimates.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Excitation energy transfer in natural photosynthetic complexes and chlorophyll trefoils: hole-burning and single complex/trefoil spectroscopic studies

Excitation energy transfer in natural photosynthetic complexes and chlorophyll trefoils: hole-burning and single complex/trefoil spectroscopic studies

Date: September 12, 2012
Creator: Ryszard Jankowiak, Kansas State University, Department of Chemistry, CBC Bldg., Manhattan KS, 66505 & 532-6785, Phone: (785)
Description: In this project we studied both natural photosynthetic antenna complexes and various artificial systems (e.g. chlorophyll (Chl) trefoils) using high resolution hole-burning (HB) spectroscopy and excitonic calculations. Results obtained provided more insight into the electronic (excitonic) structure, inhomogeneity, electron-phonon coupling strength, vibrational frequencies, and excitation energy (or electron) transfer (EET) processes in several antennas and reaction centers. For example, our recent work provided important constraints and parameters for more advanced excitonic calculations of CP43, CP47, and PSII core complexes. Improved theoretical description of HB spectra for various model systems offers new insight into the excitonic structure and composition of low-energy absorption traps in very several antenna protein complexes and reaction centers. We anticipate that better understanding of HB spectra obtained for various photosynthetic complexes and their simultaneous fits with other optical spectra (i.e. absorption, emission, and circular dichroism spectra) provides more insight into the underlying electronic structures of these important biological systems. Our recent progress provides a necessary framework for probing the electronic structure of these systems via Hole Burning Spectroscopy. For example, we have shown that the theoretical description of non-resonant holes is more restrictive (in terms of possible site energies) than those of absorption and emission spectra. We ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Visualization of Excitonic Structure in the Fenna-Matthews-OlsonPhotosynthetic Complex by Polarization-Dependent Two-DimensionalElectronic Spectroscopy

Visualization of Excitonic Structure in the Fenna-Matthews-OlsonPhotosynthetic Complex by Polarization-Dependent Two-DimensionalElectronic Spectroscopy

Date: May 26, 2008
Creator: Department of Chemistry, The University of Chicago; Department of Biology, Department of Chemistry, Washington University; Fleming, Graham; Read, Elizabeth L.; Schlau-Cohen, Gabriela S.; Engel, Gregory S. et al.
Description: Photosynthetic light-harvesting proceeds by the collection and highly efficient transfer of energy through a network of pigment-protein complexes. Inter-chromophore electronic couplings and interactions between pigments and the surrounding protein determine energy levels of excitonic states and dictate the mechanism of energy flow. The excitonic structure (orientation of excitonic transition dipoles) of pigment-protein complexes is generally deduced indirectly from x-ray crystallography in combination with predictions of transition energies and couplings in the chromophore site basis. Here, we demonstrate that coarse-grained excitonic structural information in the form of projection angles between transition dipole moments can be obtained from polarization-dependent two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy of an isotropic sample, particularly when the nonrephasing or free polarization decay signal rather than the photon echo signal is considered. The method provides an experimental link between atomic and electronic structure and accesses dynamical information with femtosecond time resolution. In an investigation of the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex from green sulfur bacteria, energy transfer connecting two particular exciton states in the protein is isolated as being the primary contributor to a cross peak in the nonrephasing 2D spectrum at 400 fs under a specific sequence of polarized excitation pulses. The results suggest the possibility of designing experiments using combinations of tailored ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Production of hydrogen in non oxygen-evolving systems: co-produced hydrogen as a bonus in the photodegradation of organic pollutants and hydrogen sulfide

Production of hydrogen in non oxygen-evolving systems: co-produced hydrogen as a bonus in the photodegradation of organic pollutants and hydrogen sulfide

Date: January 1, 2000
Creator: Sartoretti, C. Jorand; Ulmann, M.; Augustynski, J. (Electrochemistry Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Geneva (CH)) & Linkous, C.A. (Florida Solar Energy Center, University of Central Florida (US))
Description: This report was prepared as part of the documentation of Annex 10 (Photoproduction of Hydrogen) of the IEA Hydrogen Agreement. Subtask A of this Annex concerned photo-electrochemical hydrogen production, with an emphasis on direct water splitting. However, studies of non oxygen-evolving systems were also included in view of their interesting potential for combined hydrogen production and waste degradation. Annex 10 was operative from 1 March 1995 until 1 October 1998. One of the collaborative projects involved scientists from the Universities of Geneva and Bern, and the Federal Institute of Technology in Laussane, Switzerland. A device consisting of a photoelectrochemical cell (PEC) with a WO{sub 3} photoanode connected in series with a so-called Grazel cell (a dye sensitized liquid junction photovoltaic cell) was developed and studied in this project. Part of these studies concerned the combination of hydrogen production with degradation of organic pollutants, as described in Chapter 3 of this report. For completeness, a review of the state of the art of organic waste treatment is included in Chapter 2. Most of the work at the University of Geneva, under the supervision of Prof. J. Augustynski, was focused on the development and testing of efficient WO{sub 3} photoanodes for the ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
[Alumni Awards Luncheon, April 26, 1975]

[Alumni Awards Luncheon, April 26, 1975]

Date: April 26, 1975
Creator: unknown
Description: Photograph from the Alumni Awards Luncheon, Saturday April 26, 1975 at the Denton Country Club. Dr. William Glaze (standing, right), of the Department of Chemistry, Associate Dean of the College of Arts & Sciences, and Director of Institute of Environmental Studies, is seen receiving the Distinguished Teaching Award by the Alumni Association from Tom Harpool (North Texas State Teachers College 1939), President of the North Texas State University Alumni Association. Seated at far left is Edwina Granberry, to the right of Mrs.Granberry is Dr. Jim Granberry (North Texas State College 1958), Master of Ceremonies for the luncheon.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
[Alumni Awards Luncheon, April 26, 1975]

[Alumni Awards Luncheon, April 26, 1975]

Date: April 26, 1975
Creator: unknown
Description: Photograph from the Alumni Awards Luncheon, Saturday April 26, 1975 at the Denton Country Club. Seen are (left) Dr. Henry Kamp of the Department of Political Science, and (right) Dr. William Glaze, of the Department of Chemistry, Associate Dean of the College of Arts & Sciences, and Director of Institute of Environmental Studies, each of whom were awarded a Distinguished Teaching Award by the Alumni Association.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
Nuclear Chemical Research, Radiochemical Separations and Activation Analysis: Progress Report 7, November 1957 - October 1958

Nuclear Chemical Research, Radiochemical Separations and Activation Analysis: Progress Report 7, November 1957 - October 1958

Date: November 1, 1958
Creator: Meinke, W. W.
Description: Progress report discussing projects and work completed by the University of Michigan Department of Chemistry 1957-1958.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Method for the Routine Absolute Intensity and Energy Measurements of Beta Radiation; Application to Naturally Radioactive Potassium, Rubidium, Rhenium and Lutetium

Method for the Routine Absolute Intensity and Energy Measurements of Beta Radiation; Application to Naturally Radioactive Potassium, Rubidium, Rhenium and Lutetium

Date: August 1952
Creator: Suttle, Andrew Dillard, Jr.
Description: Photocopy of a dissertation discussing natural radioactivities and half life of potassium, Rubidium, Rhenium, and Lutetium.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Gordon Conference - Cluster, Nanocrystals and Nanostructures - July 29th - August 3rd, 2007

Gordon Conference - Cluster, Nanocrystals and Nanostructures - July 29th - August 3rd, 2007

Date: June 14, 2007
Creator: A. Welford Castleman, Jr.
Description: No abstract prepared.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Final Technical Report [Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons with curved surfaces: Models and precursors for fullerenes]

Final Technical Report [Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons with curved surfaces: Models and precursors for fullerenes]

Date: February 23, 2001
Creator: Radideau, Peter W.
Description: Highlights of selected achievements are briefly outlined. The bowl-to-bowl inversion barrier was measured for a hydrocarbon on the C{sub 60} surface larger than corannulene; {Delta}G was determined to be 27.8 kcal/mol. A new route to the preparation of tetraketone involving benzeneseleninic anhydride was developed that represents a significant improvement in the overall process making semibuckminsterfullerene more accessible. The first crystallographically characterized transition metal buckybowl compound was reported.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Diamond and Hydrogenated Carbons for Advanced Batteries and Fuel Cells: Fundamental Studies and Applications.

Diamond and Hydrogenated Carbons for Advanced Batteries and Fuel Cells: Fundamental Studies and Applications.

Date: April 13, 2009
Creator: Swain & M., Greg
Description: The original funding under this project number was awarded for a period 12/1999 until 12/2002 under the project title Diamond and Hydrogenated Carbons for Advanced Batteries and Fuel Cells: Fundamental Studies and Applications. The project was extended until 06/2003 at which time a renewal proposal was awarded for a period 06/2003 until 06/2008 under the project title Metal/Diamond Composite Thin-Film Electrodes: New Carbon Supported Catalytic Electrodes. The work under DE-FG02-01ER15120 was initiated about the time the PI moved his research group from the Department of Chemistry at Utah State University to the Department of Chemistry at Michigan State University. This DOE-funded research was focused on (i) understanding structure-function relationships at boron-doped diamond thin-film electrodes, (ii) understanding metal phase formation on diamond thin films and developing electrochemical approaches for producing highly dispersed electrocatalyst particles (e.g., Pt) of small nominal particle size, (iii) studying the electrochemical activity of the electrocatalytic electrodes for hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction and (iv) conducting the initial synthesis of high surface area diamond powders and evaluating their electrical and electrochemical properties when mixed with a Teflon binder.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Heterogeneous chemistry affecting upper tropospheric and stratospheric ozone. Final report, April, 1994--January, 1998

Heterogeneous chemistry affecting upper tropospheric and stratospheric ozone. Final report, April, 1994--January, 1998

Date: August 1, 1999
Creator: Worsnop, D.R.; Jayne, J.T.; Kolb, C.E. & Davidovits, P.
Description: No abstract prepared.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Final report, DOE Award No. DE-FG02-86ER13504 [Photoinduced electron transfer processes in homogeneous & microheterogeneous solutions]

Final report, DOE Award No. DE-FG02-86ER13504 [Photoinduced electron transfer processes in homogeneous & microheterogeneous solutions]

Date: August 23, 2001
Creator: Whitten, David G.
Description: The focus of this research has been the study and development of useful chemical reactions initiated via photoinduced electron transfer events.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Perforated monolayers. Final report

Perforated monolayers. Final report

Date: June 1, 2000
Creator: L., Regen. Steven
Description: This STI is a final report for a DOE-supported program, ''Perforated Monolayers,'' which focused on the fabrication of ultrathin membranes for gas separations based on Langmuir-Blodgett chemistry.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Final report [Investigations of single stranded DNA aptamers as a new tool for chemical separations]

Final report [Investigations of single stranded DNA aptamers as a new tool for chemical separations]

Date: July 2, 2002
Creator: McGown, Linda B.
Description: This final report describes results for investigation of aptameric stationary phases for separation of PAHs and metals.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Direct Examination of Separation Processes in Chromatography by Laser-Induced Fluorescence. Final technical progress report, September 1, 1989 - February 28, 1999

Direct Examination of Separation Processes in Chromatography by Laser-Induced Fluorescence. Final technical progress report, September 1, 1989 - February 28, 1999

Date: February 28, 1999
Creator: McGuffin, Victoria L.
Description: No abstract prepared.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The coordination chemistry of technetium and rhenium and applications to nuclear medicine. Final report

The coordination chemistry of technetium and rhenium and applications to nuclear medicine. Final report

Date: December 31, 1996
Creator: Zubieta, J.
Description: No abstract prepared.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Final technical report on ''The study of hot hadronic matter''

Final technical report on ''The study of hot hadronic matter''

Date: February 23, 2000
Creator: Porile, Norbert T.
Description: A summary of the accomplishments under the this Grant is given.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Study of Pair and many-body interactions in rare-gas halide atom clusters using negative ion zero electron kinetic energy (ZEKE) and threshold photodetachment spectroscopy

Study of Pair and many-body interactions in rare-gas halide atom clusters using negative ion zero electron kinetic energy (ZEKE) and threshold photodetachment spectroscopy

Date: July 9, 1998
Creator: Yourshaw, Ivan
Description: No abstract prepared.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Probing the structure and nano-scale mechanical properties of polymer surfaces with scanning force microscopy and sum frequency vibrational spectroscopy

Probing the structure and nano-scale mechanical properties of polymer surfaces with scanning force microscopy and sum frequency vibrational spectroscopy

Date: May 1, 1999
Creator: Gracias, D.H.
Description: No abstract prepared.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Electronic spectroscopy of jet-cooled combustion radicals. Final report

Electronic spectroscopy of jet-cooled combustion radicals. Final report

Date: March 11, 2002
Creator: Weisshaar, James C.
Description: Jet-cooled spectra of 1-methylvinoxy and 2-methylvinoxy are reported and analyzed with help from high-level electronic structure calculations.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Ligands for Extracting Actinide Metal Ions from Porous Solids

Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Ligands for Extracting Actinide Metal Ions from Porous Solids

Date: March 6, 2003
Creator: Herlinger, Albert W. & Dietz, Dr. Mark L.
Description: Numerous types of actinide-bearing waste materials are found throughout the DOE complex. Most of these wastes consist of large volumes of non-hazardous materials contaminated with relatively small quantities of actinide elements. Separation of these wastes into their inert and radioactive components would dramatically reduce the costs of stabilization and disposal. For example, the DOE is responsible for decontaminating concrete within 7000 surplus contaminated buildings. The best technology now available for removing surface contamination from concrete involves removing the surface layer by grit blasting, which produces a large volume of blasting residue containing a small amount of radioactive material. Disposal of this residue is expensive because of its large volume and fine particulate nature. Considerable cost savings would result from separation of the radioactive constituents and stabilization of the concrete dust. Similarly, gas diffusion plants for uranium enrichment contain valuable high-purity nickel in the form of diffusion barriers. Decontamination is complicated by the extremely fine pores in these barriers, which are not readily accessible by most cleaning techniques. A cost-effective method for the removal of radioactive contaminants would release this valuable material for salvage.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Greatly Enhanced Detectability of Geothermal Tracers Through Laser-Induced Fluorescence

Greatly Enhanced Detectability of Geothermal Tracers Through Laser-Induced Fluorescence

Date: October 30, 2002
Creator: Rose, Peter; Harris, Joel; Kilbourn, Phaedra; Kleimeyer, James & Carter, Troy
Description: WE have successfully completed a four-year R and D project to greatly reduce the detection limit of fluorescent tracers through the use of emerging laser-excitation, optical fiber, and CCD-spectroscopy technologies. Whereas the efforts over the first two years were directed at demonstrating a reduction in the detection limit of fluorescent compounds by a factor of 100 and at identifying several new fluorescein-derived tracer candidates, our recent efforts were focused primarily on the field demonstration of new tracers having detection limits in the low parts-per-quadrillion range. During the summer of 2001, we initiated field tests at the Dixie Valley, Nevada and at the Beowawe, Nevada geothermal fields using very small quantities of the fluorescein-derivative 6-carboxyfluorescein. Subsequently, we succeeded in measuring sub-part-per-trillion quantities of that candidate tracer at both the Beowawe and Dixie Valley geothermal reservoirs-using approximately 530 g of tracer at each setting. Our studies indicate that we could have observed a breakthrough using only 0.53 g of 6-carboxyfluorescein. This represents a reduction by a factor of 170,000 below the mass of tracer used in a previous tracer test at Beowawe.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Photochemical charge separation in zeolites: Electron transfer dynamics, nanocrystals and zeolitic membranes. Final technical report

Photochemical charge separation in zeolites: Electron transfer dynamics, nanocrystals and zeolitic membranes. Final technical report

Date: September 30, 2001
Creator: Dutta, Prabir K.
Description: Aluminosilicate zeolites provide an excellent host for photochemical charge separation. Because of the constraints provided by the zeolite, the back electron transfer from the reduced acceptor to the oxidized sensitizer is slowed down. This provides the opportunity to separate the charge and use it in a subsequent reaction for water oxidation and reduction. Zeolite-based ruthenium oxide catalysts have been found to be efficient for the water splitting process. This project has demonstrated the usefulness of zeolite hosts for photolytic splitting of water.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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