The effect of mode and intensity on VO2 kinetics in the severe intensity domain

The effect of mode and intensity on VO2 kinetics in the severe intensity domain

Date: May 2000
Creator: Updyke, Rhonda S.
Description: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of mode and intensity on VO2 kinetics in the severe intensity domain. Seventeen participants completed 3-7 tests each on a cycle ergometer and treadmill. For each test, Tfatigue, VO2max, Tmean response, VO2GAIN, TVO2max and T@VO2max were determined. Linear regression techniques were used to describe the relationship between TVO2max and Tfatigue . VO2max values were higher in running. The VO2 response profile was faster for running than cycling and faster at higher intensities. The faster VO2 response in running may be associated with larger active muscle mass or differences in muscle activation patterns. The faster response at higher intensities may suggest that VO2 response is driven by O2 demand.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Morning and Afternoon Response to Exercise Using Two Test Protocols

Morning and Afternoon Response to Exercise Using Two Test Protocols

Date: May 1995
Creator: Jones, Nicole A. (Nicole Amy)
Description: The purpose was to investigate time of day on responses to two types of exhaustive cycle ergometer tests. Sixteen males performed six exercise tests: three - constant power protocol and three - incremental protocol. The first test was a learning trial; the other tests were performed one in the morning and one in the afternoon. ANOVA revealed that O2 deficit and lactate were higher in the afternoon than the morning. Regardless of test type, time to exhaustion tended to be higher in the afternoon. VO2max was unaffected by the time of day and test type. These results confirmprevious reports of a time of day effect on anaerobic capacity, and support the contention that V02max is stable about a day.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Temporal Specificity in Exercise Training

Temporal Specificity in Exercise Training

Date: May 1995
Creator: Leiferman, Jennifer A.
Description: The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of training at a particular time of day on anaerobic capacity in the morning and in the afternoon.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Effects of Endurance Intensity and Rest Interval on Subsequent Strength Performance

Effects of Endurance Intensity and Rest Interval on Subsequent Strength Performance

Date: May 1996
Creator: Books, Gregory D. (Gregory Douglas)
Description: The purpose of this study was to examine the acute effects of cycling exercise at different intensities and rest intervals on strength performance. Ten males, engaged in concurrent training for at least one month prior to testing, comprised the subject group for this study. Results show only leg press torque and leg press work to be decreased after cardiorespiratory exercise of moderate intensity. Leg extension average power, chest press torque, chest press power, and chest press work after cycling were not decreased from pre-exercise values. No significant effects were found for exercise intensity, testing times, or intensity by testing times. These results indicate that lower body strength is decreased by cycling and that one hour is not sufficient to restore leg strength.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries