Basic Questions on U.S. Citizenship and Naturalization

Basic Questions on U.S. Citizenship and Naturalization

Date: March 3, 1992
Creator: Eig, Larry M.
Description: U.S. citizenship is conferred at birth under the principle of jus soli (nationality of place of birth) and the principle of jus sanguinis (nationality of parents). The U.S. Constitution states as a fundamental rule of jus soli citizenship that "all persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside." The exceptions to universal citizenship comprehended by the requirement that a person be born "subject to the jurisdiction thereof" include: (1) children born to a foreign sovereign or accredited diplomatic official; (2) children born on a foreign public vessel, such as a warship; (3) children born to an alien enemy in hostile occupation; and (4) native Indians.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Expedited Citizenship Through Military Service: Policy and Issues

Expedited Citizenship Through Military Service: Policy and Issues

Date: September 30, 2003
Creator: Lee, Margaret Mikyung
Description: This report discusses the interest in legislation to expand the citizenship benefits of aliens serving in the military. Multiple bills provide for expedited or posthumous citizenship as the result of military service (H.R. 1275, H.R. 1588, H.R. 1685, H.R. 1691, H.R. 1714, H.R. 1799, H.R. 1806, H.R. 1814, H.R. 1850, H.R. 1953, H.R. 1954, H.R. 2887, S. 783, S. 789, S. 897, S. 922, and S. 940). Variously, these bills would, among other things, reduce or eliminate the 3-year requirement for peacetime service, permit proceedings to be conducted abroad, waive processing fees, modify posthumous citizenship procedures, and provide some type of immigration benefit to surviving immediate relatives of citizens (including posthumous citizens) who die as a result of serving in active duty or, more narrowly, in a combat zone during wartime.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Uniformed and Overseas Citizens Absentee Voting Act: Overview and Issues

The Uniformed and Overseas Citizens Absentee Voting Act: Overview and Issues

Date: February 17, 2011
Creator: Coleman, Kevin J.
Description: Members of the uniformed services and U.S. citizens who live abroad are eligible to register and vote absentee in federal elections under the Uniformed and Overseas Citizens Absentee Voting Act (UOCAVA, P.L. 99-410, 42 U.S.C.1973ff) of 1986. The law was enacted to improve absentee registration and voting for this group of voters and to consolidate existing laws. Since 1942, a number of federal laws have been enacted to assist these voters: the Soldier Voting Act of 1942 (amended in 1944), the Federal Voting Assistance Act of 1955, the Overseas Citizens Voting Rights Act of 1975 (both the 1955 and 1975 laws were amended in 1978 to improve procedures), and the Uniformed and Overseas Citizens Absentee Voting Act of 1986. The law is administered by the Secretary of Defense, who delegates that responsibility to the director of the Federal Voting Assistance Program at the Department of Defense (DOD).
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Permanent Legal Immigration to the United States: Policy Overview

Permanent Legal Immigration to the United States: Policy Overview

Date: October 29, 2014
Creator: Kandel, William A.
Description: This report provides an overview of the current state of legal immigration policy in the U.S. In FY2013, just under 1 million aliens became U.S. legal permanent residents (LPRs).
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Ben's Guide to U.S. Government for Kids

Ben's Guide to U.S. Government for Kids

Date: 2014
Creator: United States. Government Printing Office. Superintendent of Documents
Description: This is the official website for Ben's Guide to U.S. Government for Kids. Ben's Guide is a service provided by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office (GPO). This site provides learning tools for K-12 students, parents, and teachers. These resources teach how the U.S. government works and include information about the branches of government, how laws are made, the election process, and citizenship. The site includes a glossary, interactive games and activities, and links to many U.S. Government web sites for children.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Digital Projects Unit