[Ceramics Factory]

[Ceramics Factory]

Date: unknown
Creator: Gough, Ray
Description: Photograph of a Chinese ceramics factory. In the foreground, vases and dishes are laid out on wooden racks. Terracotta vessels are piled up in woven baskets in the center. Two people stand in front of a kiln in back. More racks are visible in the background.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
[Ceramics Workshop]

[Ceramics Workshop]

Date: unknown
Creator: Gough, Ray
Description: Photograph of a ceramics workshop in China. A row of pitchers are visible on a table in the foreground. A woman sits behind the table painting one of the pitchers. Other tables and workers are visible behind her.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
Fuels and Materials Development Program Quarterly Progress Report, September 30, 1968

Fuels and Materials Development Program Quarterly Progress Report, September 30, 1968

Date: February 1969
Creator: Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Metals and Ceramics Division.
Description: From Foreword: "Report containing information about ongoing research and development taking place in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Fuels and Materials Development Program. This includes a series of test reports covering such subjects as reactor fuels, the development of nitride fuels, and the effects of radiation on structural materials."
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Shock compression profiles in ceramics

Shock compression profiles in ceramics

Date: March 1, 1996
Creator: Grady, D.E. & Moody, R.L.
Description: An investigation of the shock compression properties of high-strength ceramics has been performed using controlled planar impact techniques. In a typical experimental configuration, a ceramic target disc is held stationary, and it is struck by plates of either a similar ceramic or by plates of a well-characterized metal. All tests were performed using either a single-stage propellant gun or a two-stage light-gas gun. Particle velocity histories were measured with laser velocity interferometry (VISAR) at the interface between the back of the target ceramic and a calibrated VISAR window material. Peak impact stresses achieved in these experiments range from about 3 to 70 GPa. Ceramics tested under shock impact loading include: Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, AlN, B{sub 4}C, SiC, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, TiB{sub 2}, WC and ZrO{sub 2}. This report compiles the VISAR wave profiles and experimental impact parameters within a database-useful for response model development, computational model validation studies, and independent assessment of the physics of dynamic deformation on high-strength, brittle solids.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Ceramics for ATS industrial turbines

Ceramics for ATS industrial turbines

Date: May 1, 1996
Creator: Wenglarz, R.; Ali, S. & Layne, A.
Description: US DOE and most US manufacturers of stationary gas turbines are participating in a major national effort to develop advanced turbine systems (ATS). The ATS program will achieve ultrahigh efficiencies, environmental superiority, and cost competitiveness compared with current combustion turbine systems. A major factor in the improved efficiencies of simple cycle ATS gas turbines will be higher operating efficiencies than curren engines. These temperatures strain the limits of metallic alloy and flow-path cooling technologies. Ceramics materials offer a potential alterative to cooled turbine alloys for ATS turbines due to higher melting points than metallics. This paper evaluates ceramics technology and plant economic issues for ATS industrial turbine systems. A program with the objective of demonstrating first-stage ceramic vanes in a commerical industrial turbine is also described.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Ceramics Without Clay: An Exploration into Potential

Ceramics Without Clay: An Exploration into Potential

Date: May 2001
Creator: Hart, Christopher David
Description: Investigating the behavior, function and appearance of ceramic materials has proven an enduring point of interest throughout my education. In learning about the vast range of the earth-yielded materials and their physical manifestations in states ranging from wet to dry to fired, I have found myself excited and challenged to seek out ways to expand their presentation. My attention has been repeatedly drawn to the class of ceramic materials that frequently get classified as “glaze ingredients.” Understanding the structural and visual qualities of these minerals and compounds was an interest whether I was making tableware, tiles, or sculpture. For the purposes of this paper, I propose to deal expressly with the physical art-making considerations of material and process as they relate to my work in ceramics. By directing my focus as such, I hope to center my work on a concern that became evident to the art world upon the display of Marcel Duchamp’s Fountain: material equals content.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Joining NZP ceramics. Final report

Joining NZP ceramics. Final report

Date: September 26, 1995
Creator: Nicklas, K.D.; Richey, M.W.; Holcombe, C.E. Jr. & Santella, M.L.
Description: Objective was to assess techniques for joining NZP ceramics, a new family of ceramic materials that have low coefficient of thermal expansion, low thermal conductivity, and excellent thermal-shock resistance. Initially, the authors evaluated laser-beam welding over volatile fluxing agents (ferric oxide, copper oxide, boric acid, and boron nitride). They also examined other laser, arc-welding, brazing, and cold joining techniques. The NZP materials were capable of sustaining the thermal stresses associated with these joining processes without substantial cracking. Of the volatile fluxes, only the copper oxide promoted weld fusion. Efforts to accomplish fusion by laser-beam welding over copper, titanium, stainless steel, yttrium barium copper oxide, fused silica glass, and mullite/alumina were unsuccessful. Gas-tungsten arc welding accompanied by porosity, irregularities, and cracking was achieved on copper sheet sandwiched between NZP tiles. Attempts at conventional oxy-acetylene welding and torch brazing were unproductive. Silica-based oxide mixtures and copper oxide-based materials show potential for development into filler materials for furnace brazing, and phosphate-based cements show promise as a means of cold joining.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Environmental microcracking of [NZP] type ceramics

Environmental microcracking of [NZP] type ceramics

Date: December 31, 1994
Creator: Jackson, T.B. & Porter, W.D.
Description: NZP ceramics (sodium zirconium phosphate and its crystal structure analogs) have very low thermal expansion through a large temperature range. Some compositions, with a high degree of thermal expansion anisotropy, are prone to microcracking upon cooling to room temperature. The onset of microcracking is a function of sintering temperature and hence grain size. Subsequent thermal cycling affects the thermal expansion behavior of highly anisotropic compositions due to microcrack healing. Recently it has been determined that this microcracking behavior can be delayed or enhanced by controlling the atmosphere in which the ceramic is heated and cooled. The effects of various atmospheres on the thermal expansion of isotropic and anisotropic [NZP] compositions are presented.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Microwave joining of SiC ceramics and composites

Microwave joining of SiC ceramics and composites

Date: April 1, 1997
Creator: Ahmad, I.; Silberglitt, R.; Tian, Y.L. & Katz, J.D.
Description: Potential applications of SiC include components for advanced turbine engines, tube assemblies for radiant burners and petrochemical processing and heat exchangers for high efficiency electric power generation systems. Reliable methods for joining SiC are required in order to cost-effectively fabricate components for these applications from commercially available shapes and sizes. This manuscript reports the results of microwave joining experiments performed using two different types of SiC materials. The first were on reaction bonded SiC, and produced joints with fracture toughness equal to or greater than that of the base material over an extended range of joining temperatures. The second were on continuous fiber-reinforced SiC/SiC composite materials, which were successfully joined with a commercial active brazing alloy, as well as by using a polymer precursor.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Shock properties of high-strength ceramics

Shock properties of high-strength ceramics

Date: December 31, 1994
Creator: Grady, D.E.
Description: A broad class of brittle solids subjected to large amplitude shock waves can support substantial shear stress (of order 2-10 GPa) without failing due to the very limited slip systems in these materials. When failure occurs under sufficiently intense shock loading, the effect is usually observed as a wave splitting in the compressive shock front. Because of the high confining stress state associated with the failure event in the shock compression environment, it is no longer certain whether the microstructural processes of deformation are brittle or ductile. Some, although by no means sufficient, evidence supports a brittle deformation mechanism in the materials of interest. The present short paper focuses on two aspects of the transition regime neighboring the HEL in the compressive shock process. First, issues of rate dependence associated with prompt yield under shock compression are not well understood. We report here on observations of wave profile data on ceramics, examining he issue of elastic precursor decay. Also in this study, a number of the experimental observations of failure waves in ceramic materials (principally glass) are surveyed. Some of the principal results are summarized and dynamic failure mechanisms consistent with these results are discussed.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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