Global Climate Change: U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Status, Trends, and Projections

Global Climate Change: U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Status, Trends, and Projections

Date: March 12, 2002
Creator: Blodgett, John E. & Parker, Larry
Description: This report discusses greenhouse gas emissions and baselines in the U.S. and various aspects of future projections.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Global Climate Change: U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Status, Trends, and Projections

Global Climate Change: U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Status, Trends, and Projections

Date: August 15, 2003
Creator: Blodgett, John E. & Parker, Larry
Description: This report reviews U.S. emissions of greenhouse gases in the contexts both of domestic policy and of international obligations and proposals. On October 15, 1992, the United States ratified the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), which entered into force on March 21, 1994. This committed the United States to “national policies” to limit “its anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases,” with a voluntary goal of returning “emissions of carbon dioxide [CO2] and other greenhouse gases [methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O), hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), perfluorocarbons (PFCs), and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6)]” at the “end of the decade” to “their 1990 levels.”
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Global Climate Change Policy: Domestic Early Action Credits

Global Climate Change Policy: Domestic Early Action Credits

Date: July 23, 1999
Creator: Parker, Larry & Blodgett, John E
Description: This report discusses the global climate change policy and proposals to allow credit for early actions to reduce emissions.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Global Climate Change: Reducing Greenhouse Gases - How Much from What Baseline?

Global Climate Change: Reducing Greenhouse Gases - How Much from What Baseline?

Date: March 11, 1998
Creator: Parker, Larry & Blodgett, John E
Description: This report discusses the ways to reduce emissions of six greenhouses gases after the Kyoto meeting on Global Climate Change. Projecting the reductions that would be required if the U.S. were to ratify the treaty is difficult. While emissions of CO are fairly well established and account for 2 about 85% of total carbon equivalent emissions, emissions of the other gases, especially N O, are more uncertain.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Global Climate Change: Three Policy Perspectives

Global Climate Change: Three Policy Perspectives

Date: August 31, 1998
Creator: Parker, Larry & Blodgett, John E
Description: This paper examines three reasonably distinct starting points from which a U.S. response to the 1992 U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change is being framed.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Environmental Protection: New Approaches

Environmental Protection: New Approaches

Date: December 11, 2000
Creator: Blodgett, John E
Description: This report summarizes briefly a number of "new approaches," grouped under the following categories: Information: Approaches to improve the quantity and quality of information to enhance the knowledge base underlying environ- mental decisions (e.g., risk assessment, cost-benefit analysis).Public Sector Processes: Approaches to restructure governmental processes for making environmental decisions (e.g., devolution). Incentives: Approaches that emphasize incentives as opposed to regulatory or financial penalties for achieving environmental ends. Approaches that rely on markets and common law for environmental decisions to the extent possible. Approaches to inculcate environmental values in public or private managerial decisions (e.g., sustainability).
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
U.S. Global Climate Change Policy: Evolving Views on Cost, Competitiveness, and Comprehensiveness

U.S. Global Climate Change Policy: Evolving Views on Cost, Competitiveness, and Comprehensiveness

Date: January 28, 2008
Creator: Parker, Larry B. & Blodgett, John E.
Description: This report discusses the evolving views on cost, competitiveness, and comprehensiveness regarding the U.S. global climate change policy. The report starts out with the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). It discusses the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT), and negotiations on the Kyoto Protocol, which established mandatory limits on emissions for developed countries.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
U.S. Global Climate Change Policy: Evolving Views on Cost, Competitiveness, and Comprehensiveness

U.S. Global Climate Change Policy: Evolving Views on Cost, Competitiveness, and Comprehensiveness

Date: January 28, 2008
Creator: Parker, Larry B. & Blodgett, John E.
Description: This report discusses U.S. policy toward global climate change, which evolved from a "study only" to a more "study and action" orientation in 1992 with ratification of the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Global Climate Change: U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Status, Trends, and Projections

Global Climate Change: U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Status, Trends, and Projections

Date: August 15, 2003
Creator: Blodgett, John E & Parker, Larry
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Environmental Reauthorizations and Regulatory Reform: Recent Developments

Environmental Reauthorizations and Regulatory Reform: Recent Developments

Date: December 19, 1994
Creator: Blodgett, John E
Description: If general regulatory reform bills were enacted, debates on statute-specific reauthorizations could shift from regulatory reforms to the substantive regulatory requirements of each Act. In this case, regulatory reform could consist of proposals to modify statutory requirements to reduce costs to the private sector and State and local governments, to increase flexibility, and to reduce or compensate regulatory impacts on the value of private property. At issue would be a series of potential tradeoffs, for example among efficiency of environmental regulations, national consistency versus local flexibility, protection of private property rights, and degrees of health and environmental protection.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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