Design and Construction of Deinococcus Radiodurans for Biodegradation of Organic Toxins at Radioactive DOE Waste Sites

Design and Construction of Deinococcus Radiodurans for Biodegradation of Organic Toxins at Radioactive DOE Waste Sites

Date: April 22, 2001
Creator: Daly, Michael J.; Wackett, Lawrence P. & Fredrickson, James K.
Description: Seventy million cubic meters of ground and three trillion liters of groundwater have been contaminated by leaking radioactive waste generated in the United States during the Cold War. A cleanup technology is being developed based on the extremely radiation resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans that is being engineered to express bioremediating functions. Research aimed at developing D. radiodurans for organic toxin degradation in highly radioactive waste sites containing radionuclides, heavy metals, and toxic organic compounds was started by this group.Work funded by the existing grant has already contributed to eleven papers on the fundamental biology of D. radiodurans and its design for bioremediation of highly radioactive waste environments
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Development of Real-Time Measurement of Effective Dose for High Dose Rate Neutron Fields

Development of Real-Time Measurement of Effective Dose for High Dose Rate Neutron Fields

Date: August 29, 2003
Creator: Braby, L. A.; Reece, W. D. & Hsu, W. H.
Description: Studies of the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation require sources of radiation which are well characterized in terms of the dose and the quality of the radiation. One of the best measures of the quality of neutron irradiation is the dose mean lineal energy. At very low dose rates this can be determined by measuring individual energy deposition events, and calculating the dose mean of the event size. However, at the dose rates that are normally required for biology experiments, the individual events can not be separated by radiation detectors. However, the total energy deposited in a specified time interval can be measured. This total energy has a random variation which depends on the size of the individual events, so the dose mean lineal energy can be calculated from the variance of repeated measurements of the energy deposited in a fixed time. We have developed a specialized charge integration circuit for the measurement of the charge produced in a small ion chamber in typical neutron irradiation experiments. We have also developed 4.3 mm diameter ion chambers with both tissue equivalent and carbon walls for the purpose of measuring dose mean lineal energy due to all radiations and due ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Brookhaven highlights - Brookhaven National Laboratory 1995

Brookhaven highlights - Brookhaven National Laboratory 1995

Date: September 1, 1996
Creator: unknown
Description: This report highlights research conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory in the following areas: alternating gradient synchrotron; physics; biology; national synchrotron light source; department of applied science; medical; chemistry; department of advanced technology; reactor; safety and environmental protection; instrumentation; and computing and communications.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Structural biology research at the National Synchroton Light Source

Structural biology research at the National Synchroton Light Source

Date: May 1, 1996
Creator: unknown
Description: The world`s foremost facility for scientific research using x-rays and ultraviolet and infrared radiation is operated by the national synchrotron Light Source Department. This year alone, a total of 2200 guest researchers performed experiments at the world`s largest source of synchrotron light. Researchers are trying to define the three- dimensional structures of biological macromolecules to create a map of life, a guide for exploring the biological and chemical interactions of the vast variety of molecules found in living organisms. Studies in structural biology may lead to new insights into how biological systems are formed and nourished, how they survive and grow, how they are damaged and die. This document discusses some the the structural biological research done at the National Synchrotron Light Source.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
1993 Annual report on scientific programs: A broad research program on the sciences of complexity

1993 Annual report on scientific programs: A broad research program on the sciences of complexity

Date: December 31, 1993
Creator: unknown
Description: This report provides a summary of many of the research projects completed by the Santa Fe Institute (SFI) during 1993. These research efforts continue to focus on two general areas: the study of, and search for, underlying scientific principles governing complex adaptive systems, and the exploration of new theories of computation that incorporate natural mechanisms of adaptation (mutation, genetics, evolution).
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Report on the biological research program for the period January 1, 1949--March 31, 1949

Report on the biological research program for the period January 1, 1949--March 31, 1949

Date: March 31, 1949
Creator: Svirbely, J.L.
Description: This document details the activities of the biological research program conducted by the Mound Laboratory during the first quarter of 1949.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Human Genome Education Program

Human Genome Education Program

Date: May 1, 2000
Creator: Myers, Richard & Conn, Lane
Description: The funds from the DOE Human Genome Program, for the project period 2/1/96 through 1/31/98, have provided major support for the curriculum development and field testing efforts for two high school level instructional units: Unit 1, ''Exploring Genetic Conditions: Genes, Culture and Choices''; and Unit 2, ''DNA Snapshots: Peaking at Your DNA''. In the original proposal, they requested DOE support for the partial salary and benefits of a Field Test Coordinator position to: (1) complete the field testing and revision of two high school curriculum units, and (2) initiate the education of teachers using these units. During the project period of this two-year DOE grant, a part-time Field-Test Coordinator was hired (Ms. Geraldine Horsma) and significant progress has been made in both of the original proposal objectives. Field testing for Unit 1 has occurred in over 12 schools (local and non-local sites with diverse student populations). Field testing for Unit 2 has occurred in over 15 schools (local and non-local sites) and will continue in 12-15 schools during the 96-97 school year. For both curricula, field-test sites and site teachers were selected for their interest in genetics education and in hands-on science education. Many of the site teachers had no ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Plant training grant: DE-FG02-94ER20162. Final technical report

Plant training grant: DE-FG02-94ER20162. Final technical report

Date: February 1, 2003
Creator: Cashmore, Anthony R.
Description: The aim of this training grant was to educate students of Plant Science in the disciplines of Biochemistry and Chemistry, in addition to the more traditional courses in Plant Biology. Annual retreats were held which involved a day-long meeting and included lectures from Penn faculty as well as famous national and international scientists. Programs for two of these retreats are included. In addition to lecture courses, students performed research within the Departments of Biology, Chemistry, and Biochemistry and Biophysics; a publications list is given.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
FASEB Summer Research Conference. Genetic Recombination and Chromosome Rearrangements

FASEB Summer Research Conference. Genetic Recombination and Chromosome Rearrangements

Date: February 1, 2002
Creator: Jinks-Robertson, Sue
Description: The 2001 meeting entitled ''Genetic Recombination and Genome Rearrangements'' was held July 21-26 in Snowmass, Colorado. The goal of the meeting was to bring together scientists using diverse approaches to study all aspects of genetic recombination. This goal was achieved by integrating talks covering the genetics, biochemistry and structural biology of homologous recombination, site-specific recombination, and nonhomologous recombination. The format of the meeting consisted of a keynote address on the opening evening, two formal plenary sessions on each of the four full meeting days, a single afternoon workshop consisting of short talks chosen from among submitted abstracts, and afternoon poster sessions on each of the four full meeting days. The eight plenary session were entitled: (1) Recombination Mechanisms, (2) Prokaryotic Recombination, (3) Repair and Recombination, (4) Site-specific Recombination and Transposition, (5) Eukaryotic Recombination I, (6) Genome Rearrangements, (7) Meiosis, and (8) Eukaryotic Recombination II. Each session included a mix of genetic, biochemical and structural talks; talks were limited to 20 minutes, followed by 10 minutes of very lively, general discussion. Much of the data presented in the plenary sessions was unpublished, thus providing attendees with the most up-to-date knowledge of this rapidly-moving field.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Final Report: Complete Sequencing of the 2.3Mbp Genome of the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrbaculum Aerophilum, January 1, 1998 - December 31, 1998

Final Report: Complete Sequencing of the 2.3Mbp Genome of the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrbaculum Aerophilum, January 1, 1998 - December 31, 1998

Date: December 31, 1998
Creator: Kim, Ung-Jin & Simon, Melvin I.
Description: Pyrobaculum aerophilum is a hyperthermophilic archeon discovered from a boiling marine water hole at Maronti Beach, Italy that is capable of growth at 110 C. This microorganism can grow aerobically, unlike most of it's thermophilic relatives. Due to the tolerance to oxygen, it is possible to grow this microbe in the presence of air, i.e. on plates. Therefore, it is a good candidate a model organism for studying archaeal biology and thermophilism. Sequencing the entire genome of this organism will provide a wealth of information on the evolutionary and phylogenetic relationship between archaea and other organisms as well as the biology of thermophilism. We have constructed a physical map that covers estimated 2,3 Megabase pair genome using a 10X fosmid library. The map currently consists of 96 overlapping fosmid clones. We have completed sequencing the entire genome using in random shotgun approach with the supplement of oligonucleotide primer directed sequencing. Total 16,098 random sequences corresponding to approximately 3.5X genomic coverage were obtained by sequencing from both ends with vector-specific primers the 2-3 kbp genomic DNA fragments cloned into pUC18/19 vector after shearing have been assembled into a number of contigs using Phrap program developed by Dr. Phil Green at University ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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