Laboratory-directed research and development: FY 1996 progress report

Laboratory-directed research and development: FY 1996 progress report

Date: May 1, 1997
Creator: Vigil, J. & Prono, J.
Description: This report summarizes the FY 1996 goals and accomplishments of Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) projects. It gives an overview of the LDRD program, summarizes work done on individual research projects, and provides an index to the projects` principal investigators. Projects are grouped by their LDRD component: Individual Projects, Competency Development, and Program Development. Within each component, they are further divided into nine technical disciplines: (1) materials science, (2) engineering and base technologies, (3) plasmas, fluids, and particle beams, (4) chemistry, (5) mathematics and computational sciences, (6) atomic and molecular physics, (7) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (8) nuclear and particle physics, and (9) biosciences.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The BIOSCI electronic newsgroup network for the biological sciences. Final report, October 1, 1992--June 30, 1996

The BIOSCI electronic newsgroup network for the biological sciences. Final report, October 1, 1992--June 30, 1996

Date: October 1, 1996
Creator: Kristofferson, D. & Mack, D.
Description: This is the final report for a DOE funded project on BIOSCI Electronic Newsgroup Network for the biological sciences. A usable network for scientific discussion, major announcements, problem solving, etc. has been created.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
1999 Gordon Research Conference on Mammalian DNA Repair. Final Progress Report

1999 Gordon Research Conference on Mammalian DNA Repair. Final Progress Report

Date: February 12, 1999
Creator: unknown
Description: This Conference will examine DNA repair as the key component in genomic surveillance that is so crucial to the overall integrity and function of mammalian cells. Recent discoveries have catapulted the field of DNA repair into a pivotal position for fundamental investigations into oncology, aging, environmental health, and developmental biology. We hope to highlight the most promising and exciting avenues of research in robust discussions at this conference. This Mammalian DNA Repair Gordon Conference differs from the past conferences in this series, in which the programs were broader in scope, with respect to topics and biological systems covered. A conference sponsored by the Genetics Society in April 1998 emphasized recombinational mechanisms for double-strand break repair and the role of mismatch repair deficiency in colorectal cancer. These topics will therefore receive somewhat less emphasis in the upcoming Conference. In view of the recent mechanistic advances in mammalian DNA repair, an upcoming comprehensive DNA repair meeting next autumn at Hilton Head; and the limited enrollment for Gordon Conferences we have decided to focus session-by-session on particular areas of controversy and/or new developments specifically in mammalian systems. Thus, the principal presentations will draw upon results from other cellular systems only to the extent ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Development of simulation tools for virus shell assembly. Final report

Development of simulation tools for virus shell assembly. Final report

Date: January 5, 2001
Creator: Berger, Bonnie
Description: Prof. Berger's major areas of research have been in applying computational and mathematical techniques to problems in biology, and more specifically to problems in protein folding and genomics. Significant progress has been made in the following areas relating to virus shell assembly: development has been progressing on a second-generation self-assembly simulator which provides a more versatile and physically realistic model of assembly; simulations are being developed and applied to a variety of problems in virus assembly; and collaborative efforts have continued with experimental biologists to verify and inspire the local rules theory and the simulator. The group has also worked on applications of the techniques developed here to other self-assembling structures in the material and biological sciences. Some of this work has been conducted in conjunction with Dr. Sorin Istrail when he was at Sandia National Labs.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
VIBRATIONAL SPECTROSCOPY OF VIALBE; PAIRED TUMORIGENIC AND NON-TUMORIGENIC CELLS

VIBRATIONAL SPECTROSCOPY OF VIALBE; PAIRED TUMORIGENIC AND NON-TUMORIGENIC CELLS

Date: December 1, 2001
Creator: MOURANT, J. R.; YAMADA, Y. R. & AL, ET
Description: No abstract prepared.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Final technical brief / DOE grant DE-FG03-96 ER 62219. Computational study of electron tunneling in proteins

Final technical brief / DOE grant DE-FG03-96 ER 62219. Computational study of electron tunneling in proteins

Date: March 3, 1999
Creator: Regan, Jeffrey J.
Description: Electron transfer (ET) processes in proteins are characterized by the motion of a single electron between centers of localization (such as the chlorophyll dimer in photosynthetic reaction centers). An electronic donor state D is created by the injection of an electron or by photo-excitation, after which the system makes a radiationless transition to an acceptor state A., resulting in the effective transfer of an electron over several angstroms. The experimental and theoretical understanding of the rate of this process has been the focus of much attention in physics, chemistry and biology.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Strengthening programs in science, engineering and mathematics. Third annual progress report

Strengthening programs in science, engineering and mathematics. Third annual progress report

Date: September 30, 1997
Creator: Sandhu, S.S.
Description: The Division of Natural Sciences and Mathematics at Claflin College consists of the Departments of Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Physics, Engineering and Mathematics. It offers a variety of major and minor academic programs designed to meet the mission and objectives of the college. The division`s pursuit to achieve excellence in science education is adversely impacted by the poor academic preparation of entering students and the lack of equipment, facilities and research participation, required to impart adequate academic training and laboratory skills to the students. Funds were received from the US Department of Energy to improve the divisional facilities and laboratory equipment and establish mechanism at pre-college and college levels to increase (1) the pool of high school students who will enroll in Science and Mathematics courses (2) the pool of well qualified college freshmen who will seek careers in Science, Engineering and Mathematics (3) the graduation rate in Science,engineering and Mathematics at the undergraduate level and (4) the pool of well-qualified students who can successfully compete to enter the graduate schools of their choice in the fields of science, engineering, and mathematics. The strategies that were used to achieve the mentioned objectives include: (1) Improved Mentoring and Advisement, (2) Summer ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Laboratory directed research and development: FY 1997 progress report

Laboratory directed research and development: FY 1997 progress report

Date: May 1, 1998
Creator: Vigil, J. & Prono, J.
Description: This is the FY 1997 Progress Report for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It gives an overview of the LDRD program, summarizes work done on individual research projects, relates the projects to major Laboratory program sponsors, and provides an index to the principal investigators. Project summaries are grouped by their LDRD component: Competency Development, Program Development, and Individual Projects. Within each component, they are further grouped into nine technical categories: (1) materials science, (2) chemistry, (3) mathematics and computational science, (4) atomic and molecular physics and plasmas, fluids, and particle beams, (5) engineering science, (6) instrumentation and diagnostics, (7) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (8) nuclear and particle physics, and (9) bioscience.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
1999 Gordon Research Conference on Microbial Population Biology. Final Progress Report

1999 Gordon Research Conference on Microbial Population Biology. Final Progress Report

Date: July 23, 1999
Creator: unknown
Description: No abstract prepared.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Combinatorics, geometry, and mathematical physics

Combinatorics, geometry, and mathematical physics

Date: November 1, 1998
Creator: Chen, W.Y.C. & Louck, J.D.
Description: This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Combinatorics and geometry have been among the most active areas of mathematics over the past few years because of newly discovered inter-relations between them and their potential for applications. In this project, the authors set out to identify problems in physics, chemistry, and biology where these methods could impact significantly. In particular, the experience suggested that the areas of unitary symmetry and discrete dynamical systems could be brought more strongly under the purview of combinatorial methods. Unitary symmetry deals with the detailed description of the quantum mechanics of many-particle systems, and discrete dynamical systems with chaotic systems. The depth and complexity of the mathematics in these physical areas of research suggested that not only could significant advances be made in these areas, but also that here would be a fertile feedback of concept and structure to enrich combinatorics itself by setting new directions. During the three years of this project, the goals have been realized beyond expectation, and in this report the authors set forth these advancements and justify their optimism.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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