Design and Construction of Deinococcus Radiodurans for Biodegradation of Organic Toxins at Radioactive DOE Waste Sites

Design and Construction of Deinococcus Radiodurans for Biodegradation of Organic Toxins at Radioactive DOE Waste Sites

Date: April 22, 2001
Creator: Daly, Michael J.; Wackett, Lawrence P. & Fredrickson, James K.
Description: Seventy million cubic meters of ground and three trillion liters of groundwater have been contaminated by leaking radioactive waste generated in the United States during the Cold War. A cleanup technology is being developed based on the extremely radiation resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans that is being engineered to express bioremediating functions. Research aimed at developing D. radiodurans for organic toxin degradation in highly radioactive waste sites containing radionuclides, heavy metals, and toxic organic compounds was started by this group.Work funded by the existing grant has already contributed to eleven papers on the fundamental biology of D. radiodurans and its design for bioremediation of highly radioactive waste environments
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Development of Real-Time Measurement of Effective Dose for High Dose Rate Neutron Fields

Development of Real-Time Measurement of Effective Dose for High Dose Rate Neutron Fields

Date: August 29, 2003
Creator: Braby, L. A.; Reece, W. D. & Hsu, W. H.
Description: Studies of the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation require sources of radiation which are well characterized in terms of the dose and the quality of the radiation. One of the best measures of the quality of neutron irradiation is the dose mean lineal energy. At very low dose rates this can be determined by measuring individual energy deposition events, and calculating the dose mean of the event size. However, at the dose rates that are normally required for biology experiments, the individual events can not be separated by radiation detectors. However, the total energy deposited in a specified time interval can be measured. This total energy has a random variation which depends on the size of the individual events, so the dose mean lineal energy can be calculated from the variance of repeated measurements of the energy deposited in a fixed time. We have developed a specialized charge integration circuit for the measurement of the charge produced in a small ion chamber in typical neutron irradiation experiments. We have also developed 4.3 mm diameter ion chambers with both tissue equivalent and carbon walls for the purpose of measuring dose mean lineal energy due to all radiations and due ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Brookhaven highlights - Brookhaven National Laboratory 1995

Brookhaven highlights - Brookhaven National Laboratory 1995

Date: September 1, 1996
Creator: unknown
Description: This report highlights research conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory in the following areas: alternating gradient synchrotron; physics; biology; national synchrotron light source; department of applied science; medical; chemistry; department of advanced technology; reactor; safety and environmental protection; instrumentation; and computing and communications.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Structural biology research at the National Synchroton Light Source

Structural biology research at the National Synchroton Light Source

Date: May 1, 1996
Creator: unknown
Description: The world`s foremost facility for scientific research using x-rays and ultraviolet and infrared radiation is operated by the national synchrotron Light Source Department. This year alone, a total of 2200 guest researchers performed experiments at the world`s largest source of synchrotron light. Researchers are trying to define the three- dimensional structures of biological macromolecules to create a map of life, a guide for exploring the biological and chemical interactions of the vast variety of molecules found in living organisms. Studies in structural biology may lead to new insights into how biological systems are formed and nourished, how they survive and grow, how they are damaged and die. This document discusses some the the structural biological research done at the National Synchrotron Light Source.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
1993 Annual report on scientific programs: A broad research program on the sciences of complexity

1993 Annual report on scientific programs: A broad research program on the sciences of complexity

Date: December 31, 1993
Creator: unknown
Description: This report provides a summary of many of the research projects completed by the Santa Fe Institute (SFI) during 1993. These research efforts continue to focus on two general areas: the study of, and search for, underlying scientific principles governing complex adaptive systems, and the exploration of new theories of computation that incorporate natural mechanisms of adaptation (mutation, genetics, evolution).
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Report on the biological research program for the period January 1, 1949--March 31, 1949

Report on the biological research program for the period January 1, 1949--March 31, 1949

Date: March 31, 1949
Creator: Svirbely, J.L.
Description: This document details the activities of the biological research program conducted by the Mound Laboratory during the first quarter of 1949.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Human Genome Education Program

Human Genome Education Program

Date: May 1, 2000
Creator: Myers, Richard & Conn, Lane
Description: The funds from the DOE Human Genome Program, for the project period 2/1/96 through 1/31/98, have provided major support for the curriculum development and field testing efforts for two high school level instructional units: Unit 1, ''Exploring Genetic Conditions: Genes, Culture and Choices''; and Unit 2, ''DNA Snapshots: Peaking at Your DNA''. In the original proposal, they requested DOE support for the partial salary and benefits of a Field Test Coordinator position to: (1) complete the field testing and revision of two high school curriculum units, and (2) initiate the education of teachers using these units. During the project period of this two-year DOE grant, a part-time Field-Test Coordinator was hired (Ms. Geraldine Horsma) and significant progress has been made in both of the original proposal objectives. Field testing for Unit 1 has occurred in over 12 schools (local and non-local sites with diverse student populations). Field testing for Unit 2 has occurred in over 15 schools (local and non-local sites) and will continue in 12-15 schools during the 96-97 school year. For both curricula, field-test sites and site teachers were selected for their interest in genetics education and in hands-on science education. Many of the site teachers had no ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Plant training grant: DE-FG02-94ER20162. Final technical report

Plant training grant: DE-FG02-94ER20162. Final technical report

Date: February 1, 2003
Creator: Cashmore, Anthony R.
Description: The aim of this training grant was to educate students of Plant Science in the disciplines of Biochemistry and Chemistry, in addition to the more traditional courses in Plant Biology. Annual retreats were held which involved a day-long meeting and included lectures from Penn faculty as well as famous national and international scientists. Programs for two of these retreats are included. In addition to lecture courses, students performed research within the Departments of Biology, Chemistry, and Biochemistry and Biophysics; a publications list is given.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
FASEB Summer Research Conference. Genetic Recombination and Chromosome Rearrangements

FASEB Summer Research Conference. Genetic Recombination and Chromosome Rearrangements

Date: February 1, 2002
Creator: Jinks-Robertson, Sue
Description: The 2001 meeting entitled ''Genetic Recombination and Genome Rearrangements'' was held July 21-26 in Snowmass, Colorado. The goal of the meeting was to bring together scientists using diverse approaches to study all aspects of genetic recombination. This goal was achieved by integrating talks covering the genetics, biochemistry and structural biology of homologous recombination, site-specific recombination, and nonhomologous recombination. The format of the meeting consisted of a keynote address on the opening evening, two formal plenary sessions on each of the four full meeting days, a single afternoon workshop consisting of short talks chosen from among submitted abstracts, and afternoon poster sessions on each of the four full meeting days. The eight plenary session were entitled: (1) Recombination Mechanisms, (2) Prokaryotic Recombination, (3) Repair and Recombination, (4) Site-specific Recombination and Transposition, (5) Eukaryotic Recombination I, (6) Genome Rearrangements, (7) Meiosis, and (8) Eukaryotic Recombination II. Each session included a mix of genetic, biochemical and structural talks; talks were limited to 20 minutes, followed by 10 minutes of very lively, general discussion. Much of the data presented in the plenary sessions was unpublished, thus providing attendees with the most up-to-date knowledge of this rapidly-moving field.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Final Report: Complete Sequencing of the 2.3Mbp Genome of the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrbaculum Aerophilum, January 1, 1998 - December 31, 1998

Final Report: Complete Sequencing of the 2.3Mbp Genome of the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrbaculum Aerophilum, January 1, 1998 - December 31, 1998

Date: December 31, 1998
Creator: Kim, Ung-Jin & Simon, Melvin I.
Description: Pyrobaculum aerophilum is a hyperthermophilic archeon discovered from a boiling marine water hole at Maronti Beach, Italy that is capable of growth at 110 C. This microorganism can grow aerobically, unlike most of it's thermophilic relatives. Due to the tolerance to oxygen, it is possible to grow this microbe in the presence of air, i.e. on plates. Therefore, it is a good candidate a model organism for studying archaeal biology and thermophilism. Sequencing the entire genome of this organism will provide a wealth of information on the evolutionary and phylogenetic relationship between archaea and other organisms as well as the biology of thermophilism. We have constructed a physical map that covers estimated 2,3 Megabase pair genome using a 10X fosmid library. The map currently consists of 96 overlapping fosmid clones. We have completed sequencing the entire genome using in random shotgun approach with the supplement of oligonucleotide primer directed sequencing. Total 16,098 random sequences corresponding to approximately 3.5X genomic coverage were obtained by sequencing from both ends with vector-specific primers the 2-3 kbp genomic DNA fragments cloned into pUC18/19 vector after shearing have been assembled into a number of contigs using Phrap program developed by Dr. Phil Green at University ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
1998 Complex Systems Summer School

1998 Complex Systems Summer School

Date: December 15, 1998
Creator: unknown
Description: For the past eleven years a group of institutes, centers, and universities throughout the country have sponsored a summer school in Santa Fe, New Mexico as part of an interdisciplinary effort to promote the understanding of complex systems. The goal of these summer schools is to provide graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and active research scientists with an introduction to the study of complex behavior in mathematical, physical, and living systems. The Center for Nonlinear Studies supported the eleventh in this series of highly successful schools in Santa Fe in June, 1998.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Development of the Midwest Proton Radiation Institute for the treatment of cancer and other diseases using proton radiation therapy. Final report

Development of the Midwest Proton Radiation Institute for the treatment of cancer and other diseases using proton radiation therapy. Final report

Date: February 10, 2003
Creator: Cameron, John M.
Description: The Indiana University Cyclotron Facility houses three research accelerators (a 205-MeV cyclotron, a 240-MeV synchrotron, and a 500-MeV synchrotron) with space to carry out a program of fundamental and applied research including nuclear and accelerator physics, materials science, radiation biology, and proton therapy. Twelve thousand square feet associated with the 205-MeV machine is being converted into a regional proton therapy center. This center is aimed at evaluating the efficacy of treatments, and research in the development of new treatments. There will be three patient treatment rooms and an outpatient clinic. During the funding period the following activities were undertaken: construction and commissioning of the T0 Achromat; design, construction, and commissioning of the Trunk Line; design of the Energy Selection Line for all three treatment rooms; construction of the Energy Selection Line to the first treatment room; and design of the Dose Delivery System for the Large Field Line. A detailed description of each of these activities is given.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Closeout of Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC02-98ER62637

Closeout of Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC02-98ER62637

Date: July 29, 1999
Creator: Leonard, Regina M.
Description: No abstract prepared.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Annual symposium on Frontiers in Science

Annual symposium on Frontiers in Science

Date: December 31, 1998
Creator: Metzger, N. & Fulton, K.R.
Description: This final report summarizes activities conducted for the National Academy of Sciences' Annual Symposium on Frontiers of Science with support from the US Department of Energy for the period July 1, 1993 through May 31, 1998. During the report period, five Frontiers of Science symposia were held at the Arnold and Mabel Beckman Center of the National Academies of Sciences and Engineering. For each Symposium, an organizing committee appointed by the NAS President selected and planned the eight sessions for the Symposium and identified general participants for invitation by the NAS President. These Symposia accomplished their goal of bringing together outstanding younger (age 45 or less) scientists to hear presentations in disciplines outside their own and to discuss exciting advances and opportunities in their fields in a format that encourages, and allows adequate time for, informal one-on-one discussions among participants. Of the 458 younger scientists who participated, over a quarter (124) were women. Participant lists for all symposia (1993--1997) are attached. The scientific participants were leaders in basic research from academic, industrial, and federal laboratories in such disciplines as astronomy, astrophysics, atmospheric science, biochemistry, cell biology, chemistry, computer science, earth sciences, engineering, genetics, material sciences, mathematics, microbiology, neuroscience, physics, and ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Adaption of the edge of chaos in cells and ecosystems

Adaption of the edge of chaos in cells and ecosystems

Date: August 1, 1996
Creator: Kauffman, S.
Description: No abstract prepared.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Bioinformatics Symposium of the Analytical Division of the American Chemical Society Meeting. Final Technical Report from 03/15/2000 to 03/14/2001 [sample pages of agenda, abstracts, index]

Bioinformatics Symposium of the Analytical Division of the American Chemical Society Meeting. Final Technical Report from 03/15/2000 to 03/14/2001 [sample pages of agenda, abstracts, index]

Date: March 28, 2000
Creator: Kennedy, Robert T.
Description: Sparked by the Human Genome Project, biological and biomedical research has become an information science. Information tools are now being generated for proteins, cell modeling, and genomics. The opportunity for analytical chemistry in this new environment is profound. New analytical techniques that can provide the information on genes, SNPs, proteins, protein modifications, cells, and cell chemistry are required. In this symposium, we brought together both informatics experts and leading analytical chemists to discuss this interface. Over 200 people attended this highly successful symposium.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Virus Assemblies as Templates for Nanocircuits

Virus Assemblies as Templates for Nanocircuits

Date: September 25, 2002
Creator: Culver, James N. & Harris, Michael T.
Description: Advances in nanotechnology offer significant improvements in a wide range of applications that include, light weight materials with greater strength, increased energy efficiency from electronic devices, and better sensors for a range of environmental and manufacturing uses. Furthermore, since size constraints often produce qualitative changes in the characteristics of matter, it is anticipated that the exploitation of nanotechnology will result in the identification of new phenomena and functionalities derived from the physics, chemistry, and biology of matter at the nanoscale level. However, these advances will require the development of systems for the design, modeling, and synthesis of nanoscale materials. Interestingly, many biological molecules function on this scale and possess unique properties that impart the ability to assume defined conformations and assembles, as well as interact with specific chemical or biological substrates. These traits are ideally suited for developing new models and methods for the production of novel materials at the nanoscale level. The goal of this proposal is to combine expertise in biology/protein engineering (Dr. Culver, University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute) and chemical engineering/nanophase structures (Dr. Harris, Purdue University) to develop biological macromolecules suitable for use in a variety of nanotechnologies. Specifically, this work will focus on using the well-defined ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
6th International Microbeam Workshop

6th International Microbeam Workshop

Date: January 1, 2004
Creator: Prise, Dr Kevin M.
Description: The extended abstracts which are submitted here present a summary of the proceedings of the 6th International Workshop/12th LH Gray Workshop: Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response, held at St. Catherine's College, University of Oxford, UK on March, 29th-31st, 2003. In 1993 the 4th LH Gray Workshop entitled ''Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response'' was held at the Gray Cancer Institute in Northwood. This was organized by Prof BD Michael, Dr M. Folkard and Dr KM Prise and brought together 40 participants interested in developing and applying new microbeam technology to problems in radiation biology (1). The workshop was an undoubted success and has spawned a series of subsequent workshops every two years. In the past, these workshops have been highly successful in bringing together groups interested in developing and applying micro-irradiation techniques to the study of cell and tissue damage by ionizing radiations. Following the first microbeam workshop, there has been a rapid growth in the number of centres developing radiobiology microbeams, or planning to do so and there are currently 15-20 worldwide. Much of the recent research using microbeams has used them to study low-dose effects and ''non-targeted'' responses such bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive responses. The ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Cancer Risk Assessment: Should New Science be Applied? Workgroup summary

Cancer Risk Assessment: Should New Science be Applied? Workgroup summary

Date: December 15, 2002
Creator: Bull, Richard J. & Brooks, Antone L.
Description: OAK-B135 A symposium discussing the implications of certain phenomena observed in radiation biology for cancer risk assessment in general. In July of 2002 a workshop was convened that explored some of the intercellular phenomena that appear to condition responses to carcinogen exposure. Effects that result from communication between cells that appear to either increase the sphere of damage or to modify the sensitivity of cells to further damage were of particular interest. Much of the discussion focused on the effects of ionizing radiation that were transmitted from cells directly hit to cells not receiving direct exposure to radiation (bystander cells). In cell culture, increased rates of mutation, chromosomal aberration, apoptosis, genomic instability, and decreased clonogenic survival have all been observed in cells that have experienced no direct radiation. In addition, there is evidence that low doses of radiation or certain chemicals give rise to adaptive responses in which the treated cells develop resistance to the effects of high doses given in subsequent exposures. Data were presented at the workshop indicating that low dose exposure of animals to radiation and some chemicals frequently reduces the spontaneous rate of mutation in vitro and tumor responses in vivo. Finally, it was concluded that ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Northland science discovery. Final report, February 15, 1995--February 14, 1997

Northland science discovery. Final report, February 15, 1995--February 14, 1997

Date: September 1997
Creator: Sigford, A.
Description: This is a final report on the US Department of Energy`s grant of $39,900 to the PLUS Center at The College of St. Scholastica for a PREP program called Northland Science Discovery (NSD). This report includes an overview of the past year`s progress toward achieving the goals established for the project, a description of the results of these efforts and their relationship to the project goals, and appendices documenting program activities, accomplishments, and expenditures. The goal of Northland Science Discovery is to provide science and math enrichment activities for students traditionally underrepresented in science (girls, minorities, low-income, and rural children). The program works toward this goal by providing a four-week residential, research-based, science and math youth camp which serves approximately 25 students per year. NSD has been held each summer since 1992. This program also has an academic-year component consisting of reunions.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
''After the Genome 5 Conference'' to be held October 6-10, 1999 in Jackson Hole, Wyoming

''After the Genome 5 Conference'' to be held October 6-10, 1999 in Jackson Hole, Wyoming

Date: October 6, 1999
Creator: Brent, Roger
Description: OAK B139 The postgenomic era is arriving faster than anyone had imagined--sometime during 2000 we'll have a large fraction of the human genome sequence. Heretofore, our understanding of function has come from non-industrial experiments whose conclusions were largely framed in human language. The advent of large amounts of sequence data, and of ''functional genomic'' data types such as mRNA expression data, have changed this picture. These data share the feature that individual observations and measurements are typically relatively low value adding. Such data is now being generated so rapidly that the amount of information contained in it will surpass the amount of biological information collected by traditional means. It is tantalizing to envision using genomic information to create a quantitative biology with a very strong data component. Unfortunately, we are very early in our understanding of how to ''compute on'' genomic information so as to extract biological knowledge from i t. In fact, some current efforts to come to grips with genomic information often resemble a computer savvy library science, where the most important issues concern categories, classification schemes, and information retrieval. When exploring new libraries, a measure of cataloging and inventory is surely inevitable. However, at some point we ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Frontiers of Plant Cell Biology: Signals and Pathways, System-Based Approaches 22nd Symposium in Plant Biology (University of California-Riverside)

Frontiers of Plant Cell Biology: Signals and Pathways, System-Based Approaches 22nd Symposium in Plant Biology (University of California-Riverside)

Date: June 1, 2003
Creator: Minorsky, Peter V.
Description: The symposium ''Frontiers of Plant Cell Biology: Signals and Pathways, Systems-Based Approaches'' was held January 15-18, 2003 at the Riverside Convention Center in Riverside, California. The host organization for the symposium was the Center for Plant Cell Biology (CEPCEB) at the University of California, Riverside (UCR). The meeting, focusing on systems-based approaches to plant cell biology research, was the first of this kind in the field of plant biology. The speakers and nearly 100 posters placed emphasis on recent developments in plant cellular biology and molecular genetics, particularly those employing emerging genomic tools, thereby sharing the most current knowledge in the field and stimulating future advances. In attendance were many well-established scientists and young investigators who approach plant cell biology from different but complementary conceptual and technical perspectives. Indeed, many disciplines are converging in the field of cell biology, producing synergies that will enable plant scientists to determine the function of gene products in the context of living cells in whole organisms. New, cross-disciplinary collaborations, as well as the involvement of computer scientists and chemists in plant biology research, are likely additional outcomes of the symposium. The program included 39 invited session speakers and workshop/panel speakers. Sessions were convened on ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Geographical and Temporal Dynamics of Chaetocnema Pulicaria and Their Role in Stewart's Disease of Corn in Iowa

Geographical and Temporal Dynamics of Chaetocnema Pulicaria and Their Role in Stewart's Disease of Corn in Iowa

Date: May 27, 2001
Creator: Esker, Paul David
Description: This thesis investigated the biology and importance of the corn flea beetle vector and its role in the Stewart's disease of corn pathosystem. This was accomplished by determining the number of corn flea beetle generations that occur in Iowa and by quantifying the proportions of those populations found to be infested with the causal agent of Stewart's disease, pantoea stewartii. In addition, a preliminary study was conducted to determine how soil temperature was influenced by air temperature and how this may be applied to forecasting for Stewart's disease of corn. Research using yellow sticky cards and sweep netting demonstrated that there are overwintering, first, and second field generations of the corn flea beetle in Iowa. It was also observed that there was a period during June of both 1999 and 2000 when corn flea beetles were not found, which is important new management information. This research has also demonstrated that the incidence of P. stewartii-infested corn flea beetles can be monitored by ELISA testing and that the incidence fluctuates greatly throughout the corn growing season. The initial level of inoculum (P. stewartii-infested corn flea beetles in the adult overwintering generation) does not remain static during the spring as was previously ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
UNFINISHED JOURNEY Project. Final report, September 30, 1994--September 29, 1995

UNFINISHED JOURNEY Project. Final report, September 30, 1994--September 29, 1995

Date: February 1, 1998
Creator: unknown
Description: In late 1994, the U.S. Department of Energy (Nevada Operations Office) made a $199,708 grant (through the Mathematics, Science, and Technology Education Program), to the UNFINISHED JOURNEY Project. The Project began in April, 1994, to develop and implement an innovative model of student outreach by San Jose State University (SJSU) to underserved, underrepresented student populations of the East Side Union High School District (ESUHSD). The Project was formed by a consortium involving SJSU, ESUHSD, some 20 private sector organizations (foundations/corporations), numerous local community/professional organizations, and approximately 100 private funders. This proposal to the U.S. Department of Energy was to have the Department join this unique partnership to focus University outreach to underserved student populations to pursue careers in mathematics, science, and technology.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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