A Study of Behavior Analysis in a Secondary School

A Study of Behavior Analysis in a Secondary School

Date: 1948
Creator: Geer, Blanche Newby
Description: The purpose of this investigation is to study a given secondary school with which the investigator is familiar in order to determine as objectively as possible what conditions, relationships, and experiences are exercising unwholesome influences on the youngster's actions, and to determine how the school can provide opportunities for developing social behavior that will make an integrated personality.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Knowledge-of-Correct-Response vs. Copying-of-Correct-Response: a Study of Discrimination Learning

Knowledge-of-Correct-Response vs. Copying-of-Correct-Response: a Study of Discrimination Learning

Date: August 1996
Creator: Geller, David, 1952-
Description: Copying prompts with subsequent unprompted practice produced better learning of simple discriminations than feedback only of a correct response without subsequent practice. The Copy condition promoted faster acquisition of accurate performance for all subjects, and shorter response latencies and durations for 3 of 4 subjects. The data support the findings of Barbetta, Heron, and Heward, 1993 as well as Drevno, Kimball, Possi, Heward, Garner III, and Barbetta, 1994. The author proposes that response repertoires are most valuable if easily reacquired at times after original learning. Thus, reacquisition performance data are emphasized. The data suggest that discriminations acquired by copying prompts may result in useful repertoires if a practice procedure is used which facilitates transfer of stimulus control from a formal prompt to a naturally occurring stimulus.
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Replication and Extension of a Comprehensive Staff Training Program for an Autism Treatment Program

Replication and Extension of a Comprehensive Staff Training Program for an Autism Treatment Program

Date: May 2011
Creator: Johnson, Kellyn Joi
Description: Previous research has shown that early and intensive behavioral interventions are an effective treatment for young children with autism resulting meaningful gains that can maintain over time. For behavioral treatments to be effective, service providers need to be competently trained in behavioral interventions through staff training. The purpose of the current study was to replicate and extend previous research by employing a more rigorous research design, and including measures of teaching units, and staff and child affect measures. The trainee was taught 150 skills. Training methods included descriptions, modeling, practice, and feedback. Results showed that the trainee acquired all skills while maintaining an increasing number of teaching units. Child and staff also maintained favorable affect as training progressed. In addition, staff reported the training as very effective and highly satisfactory. This shows that comprehensive training packages that comprise a large set of skills in real life treatment settings can result in benefits for the staff and children.
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Conditional Discriminations and Derived Relations: Pinpointing the Moment of Emergence

Conditional Discriminations and Derived Relations: Pinpointing the Moment of Emergence

Date: August 1994
Creator: Vaidya, Manish
Description: Four subjects were exposed to the four trial types that define stimulus equivalence from the beginning of the experiment. Procedures were designed to identify acquisition dynamics and relate these observations to responding indicative of equivalence class formation. The data show that, for all subjects, the acquisition of training conditional discriminations was correlated with systematic changes in the subjects' selection responses. The results also indicate that the traditional percent correct measures obscure some important information about the subjects' behavior. The data are discussed in the context of the following statements. 1) Subjects' performances on derived trials are not indicative of relations among stimuli at some other level of analysis but are instances of "equivalencing". 2) "Equivalencing" itself can be characterized as changes in the conditional and conditionally discriminative functions of stimuli involved in the experiment. The potential benefits of this preparation are discussed.
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Behavioral Cusps: A Developmental and Pragmatic Concept for Behavior Analysis

Behavioral Cusps: A Developmental and Pragmatic Concept for Behavior Analysis

Date: 1997
Creator: Rosales-Ruiz, Jesus & Baer, Donald M. (Donald Merle), 1931-2002
Description: Article on behavioral cusps and a developmental and pragmatic concept for behavior analysis.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Public Affairs and Community Service
Socioscope: Human Relationship and Behavior Analysis in Mobile Social Networks

Socioscope: Human Relationship and Behavior Analysis in Mobile Social Networks

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: August 2010
Creator: Zhang, Huiqi
Description: The widely used mobile phone, as well as its related technologies had opened opportunities for a complete change on how people interact and build relationship across geographic and time considerations. The convenience of instant communication by mobile phones that broke the barrier of space and time is evidently the key motivational point on why such technologies so important in people's life and daily activities. Mobile phones have become the most popular communication tools. Mobile phone technology is apparently changing our relationship to each other in our work and lives. The impact of new technologies on people's lives in social spaces gives us the chance to rethink the possibilities of technologies in social interaction. Accordingly, mobile phones are basically changing social relations in ways that are intricate to measure with any precision. In this dissertation I propose a socioscope model for social network, relationship and human behavior analysis based on mobile phone call detail records. Because of the diversities and complexities of human social behavior, one technique cannot detect different features of human social behaviors. Therefore I use multiple probability and statistical methods for quantifying social groups, relationships and communication patterns, for predicting social tie strengths and for detecting human behavior ...
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Emerging Opportunities in Higher Education: Applied Behavior Analysis and Autism

Emerging Opportunities in Higher Education: Applied Behavior Analysis and Autism

Date: 2010
Creator: Ala'i-Rosales, Shahla; Roll-Pettersson, Lise, 1955-; Pinkelman, Sarah E. & Cihon, Traci M.
Description: This article discusses applying behavior analysis to autism.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Public Affairs and Community Service
The Effects of a Supportive Communication Training Workshop on the Verbal Behavior of Behavior Analysis

The Effects of a Supportive Communication Training Workshop on the Verbal Behavior of Behavior Analysis

Date: 2010
Creator: Blell, Zainab D.; Ala'i-Rosales, Shahla & Rosales-Ruiz, Jesus
Description: Article on the effects of a supportive communication training workshop on the verbal behavior of behavior analysts.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Public Affairs and Community Service
Loading the Problem Loader: The Effects of Target Training and Shaping on Trailer-Loading Behavior of Horses

Loading the Problem Loader: The Effects of Target Training and Shaping on Trailer-Loading Behavior of Horses

Date: 2001
Creator: Ferguson, Dawnery L. & Rosales-Ruiz, Jesus
Description: Article on the effects of target training and shaping on the trailer-loading behavior of horses.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Public Affairs and Community Service
A Stimulus Control Analysis of Imprinting in a Human-Reared Pigeon

A Stimulus Control Analysis of Imprinting in a Human-Reared Pigeon

Date: August 2011
Creator: Varnon, Christopher A.
Description: Events that occur early in the life of birds greatly influence social and sexual preferences throughout the course of life. Traditionally, this is explained by a learning process known as imprinting. Young birds are thought to imprint to early stimuli, causing the development of permanent preferences for those stimuli. In the present study, imprinting is examined with respect to behaviors of an adult human-reared pigeon in several conditions. The subject was either presented with no stimulus, a conspecific stimulus, a novel stimulus, a human stimulus, or the human and novel stimuli simultaneously. Several phases within these conditions were employed to pinpoint the variables that produced the most social and sexual behavior. The results showed that while some conditions produced unclear behavior, other conditions produced very clear indications of sexual preference for humans and fear of conspecifics. The results suggest that the concept of imprinting may not be needed to explain the sexual preference of the subject, and that operant contingencies may play a large role in sexual behavior.
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The Effects of a Human Trafficking Prevention Workshop Package on Participant Written and Simulation Responses

The Effects of a Human Trafficking Prevention Workshop Package on Participant Written and Simulation Responses

Date: December 2013
Creator: Sayles, Tiffany P.
Description: This study evaluated the effects of a community workshop designed to teach community members about human trafficking prevention. Participants were trained to identify the critical and non-critical features of human trafficking and safe ways to respond to identified trafficking situations. A pre-post treatment design was used to assess the effects of a community workshop across written and verbal target behaviors. This included written responses as well as simulation assessments across five different trafficking scenarios. Results indicate that all participants engaged in more correct responding within the written assessment and asked specific relevant questions with greater confidence within the simulation assessment following training. However, social media and empathy responses following the workshop did not differ from baseline. This study is one of the first empirical studies aimed at formally evaluating the effects of human trafficking prevention workshops. Results are discussed in the context of instructional design, measurement of outcomes, and interdisciplinary collaboration.
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Online Lecture As an Alternative Method of Instruction in College Classrooms: Measuring the Effects of Alternating In-class with Online Lectures in Two Sections of an Undergraduate Introduction to Behavior Analysis Course

Online Lecture As an Alternative Method of Instruction in College Classrooms: Measuring the Effects of Alternating In-class with Online Lectures in Two Sections of an Undergraduate Introduction to Behavior Analysis Course

Date: May 2013
Creator: Treacher, Kay G.
Description: Online instruction is becoming increasingly common at universities; however, there is little single subject research concerning the effectiveness of the online lecture format. We investigated whether online lecture could replace in-class lecture in two sections of an undergraduate Introduction to Behavior Analysis course without detrimentally affecting student learning. Using an adapted alternating treatments design, online and in-class lecture formats were counterbalanced across the two course sections. Experimenters collected data on lecture attendance/access, percent correct on the weekly quiz, and student report on lecture format preference. The data show that, within the context of this class, students performed equally in the weekly quiz regardless of lecture format; further, that this is consistent when looking at individual student data and mean data. However, although students stated a preference for online lecture in the questionnaire, a greater percentage of students attended in-class lecture than accessed online lecture.
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A Comparison of Vocabulary Banks and Scripts on Native English-speaking Students’ Acquisition of Italian

A Comparison of Vocabulary Banks and Scripts on Native English-speaking Students’ Acquisition of Italian

Date: May 2012
Creator: Dean, Brittany L.
Description: The study applied behavior analytic principles to foreign language instruction in a college classroom. Two study methods, vocabulary banks and scripts, were compared by assessing the effects on Italian language acquisition, retention, and generalization. Results indicate that students without prior exposure to Italian engaged in more exchanges and emitted more words in script tests compared to vocabulary bank tests. Participants with at least two classes in Italian prior to the study engaged in more exchanges and emitted more words during vocabulary bank tests. Data suggest that different teaching strategies may work for different learners. More research is needed to determine efficient teaching methods and how to ascertain which approaches work best for learners with different histories.
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A Description of the Mechanistic Dart - Thermal Dispersion Fuel Performance Code and Application to Irradiation Behavior Analysis of U-Mo/Al

A Description of the Mechanistic Dart - Thermal Dispersion Fuel Performance Code and Application to Irradiation Behavior Analysis of U-Mo/Al

Date: July 2, 2013
Creator: Ye, B.; Rest, J. & Kim, Y.S. (Nuclear Engineering Division)
Description: Abstract not provided
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
A Descriptive Analysis of the Use and Effect of a Self-management Project in an Undergraduate Course in Behavior Analysis

A Descriptive Analysis of the Use and Effect of a Self-management Project in an Undergraduate Course in Behavior Analysis

Date: May 2013
Creator: Lamancusa, Michelle
Description: Undergraduate male and female students enrolled in an introductory behavior analysis course with minimal instruction on self-management were given modified exploratory logs to use in a self-management project. Students self-monitored behavior via the log, constructed their own interventions, and reported changes in behavior and extent of success in a write up at course end. Changes in self-reported descriptions in the logs as well as the written results of a pre and post survey of emotional responses were counted. Successful self-management project interventions were reported by most students. Correspondence between planned and actual events increased. Negative reinforcement procedures characterized most students' intervention. Correspondence between events at pre and post and actual log reports was highest at post.
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The Role of a Point Loss Contingency on the Emergence of Derived Relations in the Absence of Original Relations

The Role of a Point Loss Contingency on the Emergence of Derived Relations in the Absence of Original Relations

Date: December 1997
Creator: Michniewicz, Leslie (Leslie A.)
Description: The role of point loss for symmetrical relations introduced simultaneously with probe trials in the absence of original relations on all probe trial performances was evaluated. Training was completed after six conditional discriminations were established in two contexts. Point loss was introduced simultaneously with probe trials in the absence of original relations in the first context. Probe trials with no point loss in the absence of original relations were introduced in the second context. The simultaneous introduction of probe trials and the point loss contingency may in some cases prevent the emergence of an equivalence class in the context that contained the point loss as well as in the context where no point loss occurred.
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The Effects of a Programmed Teaching Sequence and Response Card Use with Systematic Feedback on the Acquisition of Time Telling Behavior of 3 Students with Intellectual Disability

The Effects of a Programmed Teaching Sequence and Response Card Use with Systematic Feedback on the Acquisition of Time Telling Behavior of 3 Students with Intellectual Disability

Date: May 2011
Creator: Weatherford, Matthew
Description: Few studies have proposed or evaluated methods to teach telling time. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of differential reinforcement of student responding in the form of response cards to teach three middle school students with intellectual disability to tell time. Participants worked through six training phases. Results showed that correct responding increased from pre-assessment (range of 5.71-14.29% correct) to post-assessment (range of 85-100% correct). Preliminary evidence shows promise in the application of these procedures to teach telling time to middle school students with intellectual disability.
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Examining the Relationship between Variability in Acquisition and Variability in Extinction

Examining the Relationship between Variability in Acquisition and Variability in Extinction

Date: December 1997
Creator: Neff, Bryon (Bryon R.)
Description: Using the "revealed operant" technique, variability during acquisition and extinction was examined with measures of response rate and a detailed analysis of response topography. During acquisition, subjects learned to emit four response patterns. A continuous schedule of reinforcement (CRF) for 100 repetitions was used for each pattern and a 30 min extinction phase immediately followed. One group of subjects learned the response patterns via a "trial-and-error" method. This resulted in a wide range of variability during acquisition and extinction. Only one subject emitted a substantial amount of resurgent behavior. A second group of subjects was given instructions on what keys to press to earn reinforcers. This group had less variability in acquisition and extinction and resurgent responding was prevalent.
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Teaching and Learning Technologies in Higher Education: Applied Behaviour Analysis and Autism: "Necessity is the Mother of Invention"

Teaching and Learning Technologies in Higher Education: Applied Behaviour Analysis and Autism: "Necessity is the Mother of Invention"

Date: 2010
Creator: Roll-Pettersson, Lise, 1955-; Ala'i-Rosales, Shahla; Keenan, Mickey & Dillenburger, Karola
Description: Article discussing current thinking about adult education and blended learning technologies, as well as examples of emerging possibilities of multimedia technology in the development of teaching materials.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Public Affairs and Community Service
A Behavioral Economic Analysis of the Effects of Unit Price Sequence on Demand for Money in Humans.

A Behavioral Economic Analysis of the Effects of Unit Price Sequence on Demand for Money in Humans.

Date: May 2002
Creator: Williams, Jack Keith
Description: Three groups of participants were exposed to different unit price sequences. Unit prices for all groups ranged from unit price 1 to 21. Analyses of demand curves, response rates, session duration, and elasticity coefficients suggest that the sequence of exposure to unit prices can affect the elasticity of demand. In addition, the size of unit price contrast, direction of unit price change, and proximity to experimental milestones also may affect the consumption of monetary reinforcers.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
A Construct Validation Study of the Relationship Between Interpersonal Behavior Styles as Described by the Social Style of Behavior Profile and Leadership Styles as Described by the Leader Behavior Analysis

A Construct Validation Study of the Relationship Between Interpersonal Behavior Styles as Described by the Social Style of Behavior Profile and Leadership Styles as Described by the Leader Behavior Analysis

Date: May 1987
Creator: Allen, Billie (Billie Morgan)
Description: The extensive use of leadership training in industry suggests a need for validated information concerning the role of interpersonal behavior in the study of leadership styles. Early leadership research focused primarily on the traits of a leader. Subsequent research has attempted to f a correlation between leader behavior and personality type. Findings indicate that personality typologies, which include attitude and value constructs, are too broad to explain leader behavior. In order to move toward specificity in the study of leadership, it is necessary to determine if interpersonal behavior styles are related to leader behavior. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship of variables from data gathered on leadership styles from the Leader Behavior Analysis and variables related to interpersonal behavior reported from the Social Style of Behavior Profile. The dimensions of leadership style flexibility and social style of behavior versatility were also examined. A random sample of 100 corporate employees were used in this study. The research instruments that were tested for independence were the Leader Behavior Analysis and the Social Style of Behavior Profile. The results of this study indicate that the constructs of leadership style and social style are independent dimensions. Additionally, the results of ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
On the Relation between Stimulus Equivalence and Extension of Stimulus Function

On the Relation between Stimulus Equivalence and Extension of Stimulus Function

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: May 2004
Creator: Hartman, Carrie
Description: The purpose of this study was to examine the relation between stimulus equivalence (briefly, networks of relations among stimuli) and the extension of stimulus function (briefly, spread of effect across network) more closely than has been possible before. The traditional view of this relation suggests that equivalence classes mediate the extension of stimulus function and are, therefore, necessary for any extension to occur. This study used a preparation in which the conditional discriminations required for the development of equivalence classes and the simple discriminations required for the extension of function were trained or tested simultaneously. Results suggest that equivalence are not necessary for the extension of stimulus function though they may be sufficient.
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Effect of Resource Availability on Dyadic Fitness

Effect of Resource Availability on Dyadic Fitness

Date: August 2010
Creator: Neves, Ana Barbara Vieira Sinay
Description: College students participating in dyads played a game designed as an analog of early hunters whose survival, as a dyad and ultimately individually, depend on rabbits they hunt. Dyadic fitness was defined as both participants being able to hunt and it was measured by the proportion of trials in a condition that both participants hunted. The effects of scarcity (alternating rich and poor conditions) on dyadic fitness were examined in two experiments. First experiment results did not show a difference in dyadic fitness as a function of the independent variable. The second experiment increased the number of hunting seasons and also the discrepancy between scarcity in rich and poor seasons. Second experiment results show that dyads start fit in rich seasons and become increasingly fit in poor seasons. External variables could not be ruled out; therefore, additional experiments still need to be carried out to clarify results.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Retention, Endurance, Stability, and Application of Learned Performances as a Function of Training Condition

Retention, Endurance, Stability, and Application of Learned Performances as a Function of Training Condition

Date: December 2008
Creator: Cohen, Jason
Description: A functional definition of fluency describes performance frequency ranges that predict retention, endurance, stability, application, and adduction as outcomes of practice. This experiment assessed these outcomes after different training conditions using a within-subject design. Participants in an experimental group learned new skills in a condition with rate and accuracy criteria, then in a yoked, rate-controlled condition with the same number of prompted responses and correct trials in practice. Control group participants received training in consecutive conditions with rate and accuracy criteria. Performance of individuals in the control group demonstrated practice effects. Data obtained from participants in the experimental group showed similar performance across conditions. Considering efficiency, the condition with rate and accuracy criteria was superior.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
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