A Chart of the Gulf Stream

A Chart of the Gulf Stream

Date: 1786
Creator: Franklin, Benjamin
Description: Map of the Gulf Stream from Florida and the Bahama Islands at lower left of map, up along the coast of North America, and to Newfoundland and the Grand Banks at upper right of map, as charted by Benjamin Franklin. At left side is text describing the journey from Newfoundland west and south along the Atlantic coast. In the text, "Gulf" is spelled "Gulph" Labrador is labeled as "Land of the Eskimaux's". Inset at upper left is a map of the Atlantic Ocean, showing the Gulf Stream.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Newsmap. Monday, July 20, 1942 : week of July 10 to July 17

Newsmap. Monday, July 20, 1942 : week of July 10 to July 17

Date: July 20, 1942
Creator: [United States.] Army Orientation Course
Description: Front: Text describes action on various war fronts: Russia, North Africa, Vichy fleet, Atlantic, Madagascar, Jugoslavia, Burma, China. Large world map is keyed to text and illustrates time zones around the world. Includes inset maps: Battle of Midway, Battleground in North Africa, Russian Front. Photographs: U.S. carrier is hit; Somewhere in Australia; Night bloom; Desert daybreak; Taken from Rommel; All-Chinese gun crew; Seagoing tractor on test; Ride through hell. Back: Text and illustrations promote the WEFT (Wing, Engine, Fuselage, Tail) method of aircraft recognition.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Newsmap. Monday, July 27, 1942 : week of July 17 to July 24

Newsmap. Monday, July 27, 1942 : week of July 17 to July 24

Date: July 27, 1942
Creator: [United States.] Army Orientation Course
Description: Front: Text describes action on various war fronts: Southwest Pacific, China, Aleutians, Atlantic, North Africa, Western Europe, Russia. Large world map is keyed to text and illustrates time zones around the world. Includes inset maps: China front, Russian front. Includes seven photographs. Back: Photographs show a variety of tanks utilized by the British Army.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Carbon dioxide, hydrographic, and chemical data obtained during the R/V Meteor Cruise 18/1 in the North Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A1E, September 1991)

Carbon dioxide, hydrographic, and chemical data obtained during the R/V Meteor Cruise 18/1 in the North Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A1E, September 1991)

Date: July 1, 1996
Creator: Johnson, K.M.; Wallace, D.W.R.; Schneider, B.; Mintrop, L. & Kozyr, A.
Description: The North Atlantic Ocean is characterized by an intense meridional circulation cell carrying near-surface waters of tropical and subtropical origin northward and deep waters of arctic and subarctic origin southward. The related {open_quotes}overturning{close_quotes} is driven by the sinking of water masses at high latitudes. The overturning rate and thus the intensity of the meridional transports of mass, heat, and salt, is an important control parameter for the modeling of the ocean`s role in climate. The Research Vessel (R/V) Meteor Cruise 18/1 was one in a series of cruises in the North Atlantic that started in March 1991 and continued until 1995. This data documentation discusses the procedures and methods used to measure total carbon dioxide (TCO{sub 2}) and total alkalinity (TALK) at hydrographic stations, as well as underway partial pressure of CO{sub 2} (pCO{sub 2}) measured during the RIV Meteor Cruise 18/1 in the North Atlantic Ocean (Section A1E). Conducted as part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) and the German North Atlantic Overturning Rate Determination expedition, the cruise began in Reykjavik, Iceland, on September 2, 1991, and ended after 24 days at sea in Hamburg, Germany, on September 25, 1991. WOCE Zonal Section AlE began at 60{degrees}N and ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
On the diurnal characteristics of cloud structure in the marine stratocumulus transition regime

On the diurnal characteristics of cloud structure in the marine stratocumulus transition regime

Date: July 1, 1996
Creator: Miller, M.A.
Description: It is known that stratus-topped marine boundary layers in the mid- latitudes are subject to significant diurnal changes in structure caused by solar heating. One characteristic of the transition cloud regime that has been thoroughly explored is its diurnal variability. Although this variability has been discussed in other studies, the size of the database was restrictive. Thus, it is of importance to examine the diurnal characteristics of transition cloud structure in a larger data sample to validate the conclusions of these previous studies and to enhance our understanding of the effects of this diurnal variability on the climatology of the transition itself. The Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) was designed to help understand transition clouds by making comprehensive measurements of their structure over a one-month period. Data was collected using a suite of in-situ and surface-based remote sensors deployed on the island of Santa Maria.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Environmental measurements for Project Overview

Environmental measurements for Project Overview

Date: September 28, 1995
Creator: Chambers, D.H. & Ravizza, D.L.
Description: From July 10 to July 17, 1995, Project Overview was conducted at the Atlantic Undersea Test and Evaluation Center (AUTEC) at Andros Island, Bahamas. Part of the project was the collection and analysis of environmental data including wind measurements and ocean temperature and salinity profiles. This report describes these environmental measurements and presents the results of analysis performed in the field. The goal of the analysis was to calculate the Brunt-Vaeisaelae (BV) profile during operations, and provide operational recommendations from solutions of the Taylor-Goldstein (T-G) equation using the measured BV profile. Part 1 is a description of the sensors and their deployment. Part 2 discusses the analysis done in the field. Part 3 presents a summary of the wind measurements. Part 4 summarizes the ocean profiling results. Part 5 presents overall conclusions and recommendations for future experiments. The appendices include all of the ocean profiling results and wind measurements obtained in the field.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Ascension Island hydroacoustic experiment: purpose, data set features and plans for future analysis

The Ascension Island hydroacoustic experiment: purpose, data set features and plans for future analysis

Date: July 23, 1999
Creator: Harben, P E; Rock, D & Rodgers, A J
Description: Calibration of hydroacoustic and T-phase stations for Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) monitoring will be an important element in establishing new operational stations and upgrading existing stations. Calibration of hydroacoustic stations is herein defined as precision location of the hydrophones and determination of the amplitude response from a known source energy. T-phase station calibration is herein defined as a determination of station site attenuation as a function of frequency, bearing, and distance for known impulsive energy sources in the ocean. To understand how to best conduct calibration experiments for both hydroacoustic and T-phase stations, an experiment was conducted in May, 1999 at Ascension Island in the South Atlantic Ocean. The experiment made use of a British oceanographic research vessel and collected data that will be used for CTBT issues and for fundamental understanding of the Ascension Island volcanic edifice.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department