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Newsmap. Monday, July 20, 1942 : week of July 10 to July 17

Newsmap. Monday, July 20, 1942 : week of July 10 to July 17

Date: July 20, 1942
Creator: [United States.] Army Orientation Course
Description: Front: Text describes action on various war fronts: Russia, North Africa, Vichy fleet, Atlantic, Madagascar, Jugoslavia, Burma, China. Large world map is keyed to text and illustrates time zones around the world. Includes inset maps: Battle of Midway, Battleground in North Africa, Russian Front. Photographs: U.S. carrier is hit; Somewhere in Australia; Night bloom; Desert daybreak; Taken from Rommel; All-Chinese gun crew; Seagoing tractor on test; Ride through hell. Back: Text and illustrations promote the WEFT (Wing, Engine, Fuselage, Tail) method of aircraft recognition.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Newsmap. Monday, July 27, 1942 : week of July 17 to July 24

Newsmap. Monday, July 27, 1942 : week of July 17 to July 24

Date: July 27, 1942
Creator: [United States.] Army Orientation Course
Description: Front: Text describes action on various war fronts: Southwest Pacific, China, Aleutians, Atlantic, North Africa, Western Europe, Russia. Large world map is keyed to text and illustrates time zones around the world. Includes inset maps: China front, Russian front. Includes seven photographs. Back: Photographs show a variety of tanks utilized by the British Army.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
NSF final project report planning and implementation of the U.S. Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (U.S. JGOFS)

NSF final project report planning and implementation of the U.S. Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (U.S. JGOFS)

Date: July 1, 1996
Creator: Livingston, Hugh D.
Description: Conducted planning and implementation of ocean carbon dioxide hydrographic surveys ocean process studies, time-series studies of Bermuda and Hawaii, and sponsored scientific workshops for those activities.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Assessment of primary production and optical variability in shelf and slope waters near Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. Final project report

Assessment of primary production and optical variability in shelf and slope waters near Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. Final project report

Date: February 12, 2001
Creator: Redalje, Donald G. & Lohrenz, Stevern E.
Description: In this project we determined primary production and optical variability in the shelf and slope waters off of Cape Hatteras, N.C. These processes were addressed in conjunction with other Ocean Margins Program investigators, during the Spring Transition period and during Summer. We found that there were significant differences in measured parameters between Spring and Summer, enabling us to develop seasonally specific carbon production and ecosystem models as well as seasonal and regional algorithm improvements for use in remote sensing applications.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Organic carbon burial in the Cape Hatteras ocean margins. Relationships with mineral surfaces

Organic carbon burial in the Cape Hatteras ocean margins. Relationships with mineral surfaces

Date: February 10, 2000
Creator: Mayer, Lawrence M.
Description: This project examined controls on organic carbon preservation in ocean margin sediments around Cape Hatteras, USA. Grain size variation explained most variance in sedimentary organic carbon concentrations. Normalizing to grain surface areas allowed identification of areas of particularly high organic matter loading - i.e., the upper slope regions. Spatial variations in concentrations are influenced by redistribution of organoclay aggregates. This region has higher grain size-normalized organic carbon concentrations than any other ocean margin environment with an aerobic water column studied to date. Small scale variations in the Chesapeake Bay were also studied.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Atlantic Coastal Experiment III: R/V KNORR cruise 68, 4-30 August 1977; FRV ALBATROSS IV cruise 77-07, 1-4, 16-31 August 1977. Data Report, volume 2.

Atlantic Coastal Experiment III: R/V KNORR cruise 68, 4-30 August 1977; FRV ALBATROSS IV cruise 77-07, 1-4, 16-31 August 1977. Data Report, volume 2.

Date: March 1, 1983
Creator: Judkins, D.C. & von Bock, K.
Description: Data are reported from KNORR cruise 88, the major investigation of the third Atlantic Coastal Experiment (ACE), conducted during a period of pronounced water-column stratification.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Atlantic coastal experiment, phytoplankton species composition: 1976-1978, data report

Atlantic coastal experiment, phytoplankton species composition: 1976-1978, data report

Date: June 1, 1979
Creator: Falkowski, P. & von Bock, K. (eds.)
Description: Phytoplankton samples are routinely taken at every station on Brookhaven oceanographic cruises. On productivity stations samples are taken from every depth, while on hydrographic stations samples are taken from the surface and some fixed depth (e.g. 20 m). The 125 ml samples are drawn as soon as possible after the cast from Niskin bottles and preserved with 2-3 ml of Lugol's solution. The samples are left in dark boxes in cool areas until counted. For counting, 10 ml subsamples are settled in Uttermohl chambers, usually within three months after the cruise, and counted with an inverted microscope equipped with phase contrast illumination. Between one-half and the entire chamber are counted, depending on the cell density. This data report is a listing of the phyto- plankton counts from selected stations and cruises between 1976 and 1978, inclusive.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
FRV Deleware II cruise, 30 June to 7 July 1978. Data report

FRV Deleware II cruise, 30 June to 7 July 1978. Data report

Date: May 1, 1982
Creator: Behrens, W. & von Bock, K. (eds.)
Description: This was the last of three companion cruises designed to provide broad-scale coverage of seasonal shelf conditions occurring between the April and October investigations undertaken aboard ATLANTIS II cruises 99 and 104.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Aerosol sulfate loading and shortwave direct radiative forcing over the North Atlantic Ocean

Aerosol sulfate loading and shortwave direct radiative forcing over the North Atlantic Ocean

Date: March 1, 1997
Creator: Nemesure, S.; Benkovitz, C.M. & Schwartz, S.E.
Description: Shortwave radiative forcing of climate by anthropogenic sulfate aerosols is estimated to be equal in magnitude but opposite in sign to that of greenhouse warming, with a global annual average value of approximately -1 W m{sup -2} uncertain to at least a factor of two. Estimates of the 2 contributions to this forcing by the direct effect are -0.4 W m{sup -2}. It is therefore necessary to accurately and efficiently represent this forcing in climate models, specifically including spatial and temporal variability. Here we explore a method to expedite the process for determining this forcing. The method utilizes an approach where the forcing is computed precisely at several discrete radii (r) and then integrated over an arbitrary aerosol size distribution. Additionally, the forcing is calculated at several values of relative humidity (RH), solar zenith angle (SZA), and aerosol optical thickness ({tau}). The parameters can be interpolated to provide the forcing at specific intermediate values. Alternatively, an empirical relationship between the forcing and the above mentioned variables can be utilized to further reduce computation time. At present, the calculations are restricted to ammonium sulfate particles over an ocean surface. The advantage of the ocean surface is the constant and low albedo ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Carbon dioxide, hydrographic, and chemical data obtained during the R/V Meteor Cruise 22/5 in the South Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A10, December 1992--January 1993)

Carbon dioxide, hydrographic, and chemical data obtained during the R/V Meteor Cruise 22/5 in the South Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A10, December 1992--January 1993)

Date: April 1, 1997
Creator: Johnson, K.M.; Wallace, D.W.R.; Schneider, B. & Mintrop, L.
Description: This documentation discusses the procedures and methods used to measure total carbon dioxide (TCO{sub 2}), total alkalinity at Hydrographic stations as well as the underway partial pressure of CO{sub 2} (pCO{sub 2}) during the R/V Meteor Cruise M22/5 in the South Atlantic Ocean (Section A10). Conducted as part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE), the cruise began in Rio de Janeiro on 27 December 1992, and ended after 36 days at sea in Capetown, South Africa on 31 January 1993. Instructions for accessing the data are provided. TCO{sub 2} was measured using tow automated sample processors for extracting CO{sub 2} from seawater samples which were coupled to a Coulometer for detection of the extracted CO{sub 2}. The overall precision and accuracy of the analyses was {+-} 1.9 {micro}mol/kg. Samples collected for total alkalinity were measured by potentiometric titration; precision was {+-} 2.0 {micro}mol/kg. Underway pCO{sub 2} was measured by Infra Red (IR) Photometry; precision was {+-} 2.0 {micro}atm. From these cruises the large-scale three-dimensional distribution of temperature, salinity, and chemical constituents, including the carbonate system parameters will be mapped. Knowledge of these parameters and their initial conditions will allow determination of heat and water transports as well as carbon ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
MASSIVELY PARALLEL IMPLEMENTATION OF A HIGH ORDER DOMAIN DECOMPOSITION EQUATORIAL OCEAN MODEL

MASSIVELY PARALLEL IMPLEMENTATION OF A HIGH ORDER DOMAIN DECOMPOSITION EQUATORIAL OCEAN MODEL

Date: July 15, 1998
Creator: MA,H.; MCCAFFREY,J.W. & PIACSEK,S.
Description: The present work is about the algorithms and parallel constructs of a spectral element equatorial ocean model. It shows that high order domain decomposition ocean models can be efficiently implemented on massively parallel architectures, such as the Connection Machine Model CM5. The optimized computational efficiency of the parallel spectral element ocean model comes not only from the exponential convergence of the numerical solution, but also from the work-intensive, medium-grained, geometry-based data parallelism. The data parallelism is created to efficiently implement the spectral element ocean model on the distributed-memory massively parallel computer, which minimizes communication among processing nodes. Computational complexity analysis is given for the parallel algorithm of the spectral element ocean model, and the model's parallel performance on the CM5 is evaluated. Lastly, results from a simulation of wind-driven circulation in low-latitude Atlantic ocean are described.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The influence of cut off lows on sulfate burdens over the North Atlantic during April, 1987

The influence of cut off lows on sulfate burdens over the North Atlantic during April, 1987

Date: January 14, 2001
Creator: Benkovitz, C.M.; Miller, M.A.; Schwartz, S.E. & Kwon, O.U.
Description: The authors have presented examples from a modeling study of the development of sulfur burdens over North America, the North Atlantic Ocean and Europe during April, 1987 using observation-derived meteorological data to represent the actual conditions for this period, focusing on the influence of cut-off lows on SO{sub 2} and sulfate column burdens over the North Atlantic Ocean. The analysis demonstrates that these systems can serve either as sources or sinks of sulfate, and that the major factor governing their resulting effect is the position during its formative stages relative to (a) sources of moisture, and (b) sulfur emissions, which regulates the availability of sulfur, cloud liquid water for sulfur oxidation, and the amount of precipitation for sulfate removal produced in the later stages of the life cycle.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Surficial bioturbation and rapid benthic remineralization in the Cape Hatteras shelf/slope region. Final report

Surficial bioturbation and rapid benthic remineralization in the Cape Hatteras shelf/slope region. Final report

Date: March 17, 1999
Creator: Aller, Robert C.; Aller, Josephine Y.; Lee, C. & Cochran, J. Kirk
Description: This is a final report for the DOE of grant DE-FG02-92ER61464 ''Surficial bioturbation and rapid benthic remineralization in the Cape Hatteras shelf slope region''. Over the past 6 years we have participated in a multidisciplinary field study called the Ocean margins Program (OMP) to examine the importance of continental margins in the global carbon cycle. Specifically, we have focused on the southern portion of the Mid-Atlantic Bight between Cape Hatteras and Chesapeake Bay where a large flux of freshwater and organic carbon enters the North Atlantic Ocean. Additionally, during the first stage of this project, we developed the use of CM-a distributions in sediments as a quantitative indicator of benthic C flux and remineralization rates. The primary objective of our research group has been to understand mechanisms and quantify biogeochemical processes in the seabed that affect cycling, flux, and storage of carbon on the ocean margin of the Mid-Atlantic Bight.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Shipboard measurements of the cloud-capped marine boundary layer during FIRE/ASTEX. Technical progress report, February 7--September 16, 1992

Shipboard measurements of the cloud-capped marine boundary layer during FIRE/ASTEX. Technical progress report, February 7--September 16, 1992

Date: September 16, 1992
Creator: Kropfli, R.A.
Description: ASTEX is a large multi-agency program to investigate all aspects of marina stratus clouds because of their overall importance in regulating the earth`s climate system. During the month of June, 1992, the ASTEX field program focused on clouds in the Eastern Atlantic because of the expected frequency of low clouds in that area. The experiment was based on the islands of Santa Maria in the Azores and Porto Santo about 800 km away in the Madeira Archipelago with large contingents of remote sensors operated from both islands. To form an equilateral triangle of remote sensors, a ship was used as the third platform.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Shipboard measurements of the cloud-capped marine boundary layer during FIRE/ASTEX. Technical progress report, October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993

Shipboard measurements of the cloud-capped marine boundary layer during FIRE/ASTEX. Technical progress report, October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993

Date: September 30, 1993
Creator: Kropfil, R.A.
Description: ASTEX is a large multi-agency program to investigate all aspects of marine stratus clouds because of their overall importance in regulating the earth`s climate system. The program focused on clouds in the Eastern Atlantic during the month of June, 1992 because of the expected frequency of low clouds in that area. The experiment was based on the islands of Santa Maria in the Azores and Porto Santo about 800 km away in the Madeira Archipelago with large complements of remote sensors operated from both islands. To form an equilateral triangle of remote sensors, a ship was used as the third platform.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Interaction between surface wind and ocean circulation in the Carolina Capes in a coupled low-order model

Interaction between surface wind and ocean circulation in the Carolina Capes in a coupled low-order model

Date: March 18, 1997
Creator: Xie, L.; Pietrafesa, L.J. & Raman, S.
Description: Interactions between surface winds and ocean currents over an east-coast continental shelf are studied using a simple mathematical model. The model physics include cross-shelf advection of sea surface temperature (SST) by Ekman drift, upwelling due to Ekman transport divergence, differential heating of the low-level atmosphere by a cross-shelf SST gradient, and the Coriolis effect. Additionally, the effects of diabatic cooling of surface waters due to air-sea heat exchange and of the vertical density stratification on the thickness of the upper ocean Ekman layer are considered. The model results are qualitatively consistent with observed wind-driven coastal ocean circulation and surface wind signatures induced by SST. This simple model also demonstrates that two-way air-sea interaction plays a significant role in the subtidal frequency variability of coastal ocean circulation and mesoscale variability of surface wind fields over coastal waters.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
SEA BREEZE REGIMES IN THE NEW YORK CITY REGION - MODELING AND RADAR OBSERVATIONS

SEA BREEZE REGIMES IN THE NEW YORK CITY REGION - MODELING AND RADAR OBSERVATIONS

Date: January 11, 1998
Creator: MICHAEL,P.; MILLER,M. & TONGUE,J.S.
Description: The evolution of the sea breeze front in the region where New York and New Jersey meet can be different from that in adjacent regions. Bornstein (1994) and Reiss et al. (1996) have reported observations that show the sea breeze front advancing more slowly in this region than over Long Island and central New Jersey. While in the southern section of New Jersey a single, classical sea breeze development occurs. This paper presents results from model simulations, surface observations and remote sensing using the Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler (WSR-88D).
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Carbon dioxide, hydrographic, and chemical data obtained during the R/V Meteor Cruise 18/1 in the North Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A1E, September 1991)

Carbon dioxide, hydrographic, and chemical data obtained during the R/V Meteor Cruise 18/1 in the North Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A1E, September 1991)

Date: July 1, 1996
Creator: Johnson, K.M.; Wallace, D.W.R.; Schneider, B.; Mintrop, L. & Kozyr, A.
Description: The North Atlantic Ocean is characterized by an intense meridional circulation cell carrying near-surface waters of tropical and subtropical origin northward and deep waters of arctic and subarctic origin southward. The related {open_quotes}overturning{close_quotes} is driven by the sinking of water masses at high latitudes. The overturning rate and thus the intensity of the meridional transports of mass, heat, and salt, is an important control parameter for the modeling of the ocean`s role in climate. The Research Vessel (R/V) Meteor Cruise 18/1 was one in a series of cruises in the North Atlantic that started in March 1991 and continued until 1995. This data documentation discusses the procedures and methods used to measure total carbon dioxide (TCO{sub 2}) and total alkalinity (TALK) at hydrographic stations, as well as underway partial pressure of CO{sub 2} (pCO{sub 2}) measured during the RIV Meteor Cruise 18/1 in the North Atlantic Ocean (Section A1E). Conducted as part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) and the German North Atlantic Overturning Rate Determination expedition, the cruise began in Reykjavik, Iceland, on September 2, 1991, and ended after 24 days at sea in Hamburg, Germany, on September 25, 1991. WOCE Zonal Section AlE began at 60{degrees}N and ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Performance of an island seismic station for recording T-phases

Performance of an island seismic station for recording T-phases

Date: May 1, 1998
Creator: Hanson, J. A., LLNL
Description: As part of the International Monitoring System (IMS) a worldwide hydroacoustic network consisting of 6 hydrophone and 5 island seismic stations has been planned which will monitor for underwater or low altitude atmospheric explosions. Data from this network is to be integrated with other IMS networks monitoring the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty. The seismic (T-phase) stations are significantly less sensitive than hydrophones to ocean borne acoustic waves. T-phase signal strength at seismic stations depends on the amplitude of the signal in the water column, the hydroacoustic-seismic conversion efficiency, and loss on the seismic portion of the path through the island. In order to understand how these factors influence the performance of T-phase stations seismic and hydroacoustic data are examined from instruments currently deployed on or around Ascension Island in the South Atlantic Ocean. T-phase recordings for the last 3 years have been collected from the GSN seismic station ASCN on Ascension Island. Surrounding the island are 5 hydrophones which are part of the U.S. Air Force Missile Impact Locating System (MILS). Data from this system have been obtained for some of the events observed at ASCN. Four of the hydrophones are located within 30 km of the coast while the ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Environmental measurements for Project Overview

Environmental measurements for Project Overview

Date: September 28, 1995
Creator: Chambers, D.H. & Ravizza, D.L.
Description: From July 10 to July 17, 1995, Project Overview was conducted at the Atlantic Undersea Test and Evaluation Center (AUTEC) at Andros Island, Bahamas. Part of the project was the collection and analysis of environmental data including wind measurements and ocean temperature and salinity profiles. This report describes these environmental measurements and presents the results of analysis performed in the field. The goal of the analysis was to calculate the Brunt-Vaeisaelae (BV) profile during operations, and provide operational recommendations from solutions of the Taylor-Goldstein (T-G) equation using the measured BV profile. Part 1 is a description of the sensors and their deployment. Part 2 discusses the analysis done in the field. Part 3 presents a summary of the wind measurements. Part 4 summarizes the ocean profiling results. Part 5 presents overall conclusions and recommendations for future experiments. The appendices include all of the ocean profiling results and wind measurements obtained in the field.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
On the diurnal characteristics of cloud structure in the marine stratocumulus transition regime

On the diurnal characteristics of cloud structure in the marine stratocumulus transition regime

Date: July 1, 1996
Creator: Miller, M.A.
Description: It is known that stratus-topped marine boundary layers in the mid- latitudes are subject to significant diurnal changes in structure caused by solar heating. One characteristic of the transition cloud regime that has been thoroughly explored is its diurnal variability. Although this variability has been discussed in other studies, the size of the database was restrictive. Thus, it is of importance to examine the diurnal characteristics of transition cloud structure in a larger data sample to validate the conclusions of these previous studies and to enhance our understanding of the effects of this diurnal variability on the climatology of the transition itself. The Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) was designed to help understand transition clouds by making comprehensive measurements of their structure over a one-month period. Data was collected using a suite of in-situ and surface-based remote sensors deployed on the island of Santa Maria.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Comparison of Inorganic Carbon System Parameters Measured in the Atlantic Ocean from 1990 to 1998 and Recommended Adjustments

Comparison of Inorganic Carbon System Parameters Measured in the Atlantic Ocean from 1990 to 1998 and Recommended Adjustments

Date: May 21, 2003
Creator: Wanninkhof, R.
Description: As part of the global synthesis effort sponsored by the Global Carbon Cycle project of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and U.S. Department of Energy, a comprehensive comparison was performed of inorganic carbon parameters measured on oceanographic surveys carried out under auspices of the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study and related programs. Many of the cruises were performed as part of the World Hydrographic Program of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment and the NOAA Ocean-Atmosphere Carbon Exchange Study. Total dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), total alkalinity (TAlk), fugacity of CO{sub 2}, and pH data from twenty-three cruises were checked to determine whether there were systematic offsets of these parameters between cruises. The focus was on the DIC and TAlk state variables. Data quality and offsets of DIC and TAlk were determined by using several different techniques. One approach was based on crossover analyses, where the deep-water concentrations of DIC and TAlk were compared for stations on different cruises that were within 100 km of each other. Regional comparisons were also made by using a multiple-parameter linear regression technique in which DIC or TAlk was regressed against hydrographic and nutrient parameters. When offsets of greater than 4 {micro}mol/kg were observed ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Meteor Cruise 28/1 in the South Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A8, March 29 - May 12, 1994)

Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Meteor Cruise 28/1 in the South Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A8, March 29 - May 12, 1994)

Date: May 9, 2002
Creator: Kozyr, A.
Description: This data documentation discusses the procedures and methods used to measure total carbon dioxide (TCO{sub 2}) and the fugacity of CO{sub 2} (fCO{sub 2}) at hydrographic stations during the R/V Meteor oceanographic cruise 28/1 in the South Atlantic Ocean (Section A8). Conducted as part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE), the cruise began in Recife, Brazil, on March 29, 1994, and ended after 35 days at sea in Walvis Bay, Namibia, on May 12, 1994. Instructions for accessing the data are provided. TCO{sub 2} was measured using two single-operator multiparameter metabolic analyzers (SOMMA) coupled to a coulometer for extracting and detecting CO{sub 2} from seawater samples. The overall precision and accuracy of the analyses was {+-}1.17 {micro}mol/kg. For the second carbonate system parameter, the fCO{sub 2} was measured in discrete samples by equilibrating a known volume of liquid phase (seawater) with a known volume of a gas phase containing a known mixture of CO{sub 2} in gaseous nitrogen (N{sub 2}). After equilibration, the gas phase CO{sub 2} concentration was determined by flame ionization detection following the catalytic conversion of CO{sub 2} to methane (CH{sub 4}). The precision of these measurements was less than or equal to 1.0%. The R/V ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Hesperides Cruise in the Atlantic Ocean

Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Hesperides Cruise in the Atlantic Ocean

Date: June 9, 2000
Creator: Millero, F.J.
Description: This data documentation discusses the procedures and methods used to measure total carbon dioxide (TCO{sub 2}), total alkalinity (TALK), and pH at hydrographic stations during the R/V Hesperides oceanographic cruise in the Atlantic Ocean (Section A5). Conducted as part of the Work Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE), the cruise began in Cadiz, Spain, on July 14, 1992, and ended in Miami, Florida, on August 15, 1992. Measurements made along WOCE Section A5 included CTD pressure, temperature, salinity, and oxygen; and bottle salinity, oxygen, phosphate, nitrate, nitrite, silicate, TCO{sub 2}, TALK, and pH. The TALK, TCO{sub 2}, and pH were determined from titrations of seawater collected at 33 stations. The titration systems for measuring TALK and TCO{sub 2} were calibrated in the laboratory with certified reference materials (CRMs) before the cruise to ensure traceable results. Standard reference seawater provided by Andrew Dickson of Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) was used at sea to monitor the performance of the titration systems. The results agree with the laboratory results to {+-} 2 {micro}mol/kg for TALK and {+-} 1 {micro}mol/kg for TCO{sub 2}. The titration systems used to measure pH were calibrated with TRIS seawater buffers prepared in the laboratory and measured with an H{sub ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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