Arsenic in Drinking Water: Regulatory Develpoments and Issues

Arsenic in Drinking Water: Regulatory Develpoments and Issues

Date: February 7, 2005
Creator: Tiemann, Mary
Description: This report discusses issues regarding the arsenic’s health effects and how to reduce the uncertainty in assessing health risks associated with exposure to low levels of arsenic. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued the current standard of 50 parts per billion (ppb) in 1975. . This report reviews EPA efforts to develop a new arsenic rule and summarizes key provisions and subsequent events.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Arsenic in Drinking Water: Regulatory Develpoments and Issues

Arsenic in Drinking Water: Regulatory Develpoments and Issues

Date: October 20, 2005
Creator: Tiemann, Mary
Description: This report discusses issues regarding the arsenic’s health effects and how to reduce the uncertainty in assessing health risks associated with exposure to low levels of arsenic. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued the current standard of 50 parts per billion (ppb) in 1975. . This report reviews EPA efforts to develop a new arsenic rule and summarizes key provisions and subsequent events.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Arsenic in Drinking Water: Recent Regulatory Developments and Issues

Arsenic in Drinking Water: Recent Regulatory Developments and Issues

Date: November 16, 2001
Creator: Tiemann, Mary
Description: This report discusses issues regarding the arsenic’s health effects and how to reduce the uncertainty in assessing health risks associated with exposure to low levels of arsenic. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued the current standard of 50 parts per billion (ppb) in 1975. . This report reviews EPA efforts to develop a new arsenic rule and summarizes key provisions and subsequent events.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Arsenic in Drinking Water: Recent Regulatory Developments and Issues

Arsenic in Drinking Water: Recent Regulatory Developments and Issues

Date: April 29, 2002
Creator: Tiemann, Mary
Description: This report discusses issues regarding the arsenic’s health effects and how to reduce the uncertainty in assessing health risks associated with exposure to low levels of arsenic. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued the current standard of 50 parts per billion (ppb) in 1975. . This report reviews EPA efforts to develop a new arsenic rule and summarizes key provisions and subsequent events.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Role of fly ash in heavy metal removal from flue gas. Final report, September 1, 1994--February 29, 1996

Role of fly ash in heavy metal removal from flue gas. Final report, September 1, 1994--February 29, 1996

Date: October 1, 1996
Creator: Bavarian, F.; Mahuli, S.; Ghosh-Dastidar, A.; Agnihotri, R. & Fan, Liang-Shih
Description: The work is mainly focused towards investigating the sorption phenomena of a representative chalcophile, arsenic (As) species, on fly ashes at temperatures representative of the upper-furnace region (850 -1200{degrees}C) and the economizer section (375-600{degrees}C). Arsenic is chosen because it is a highly toxic chalcophile and shows some affinity for fly ash but is also emitted from the stack as vapor and aerosol particles. Based on the preliminary thermodynamic analyses it was determined that under the temperature ranges of interest (400- 600{degrees}C and 800-1000{degrees}C) arsenic trioxide (As{sub 2}O{sub 3}) is the main arsenic species in the flue gas environment. The two temperature zones have been chosen because most of the dry-sorbent injection technologies are being developed for application in these two regions. Also various fly ash samples from different sources are being studied because their chemical composition and subsequently their chemical sorption characteristics would show a great deal of variation depending on their source. Studies were also conducted with calcium hydroxide as the chosen representative dry sorbent. This served as comparative studies between fly ash and dry sorbents. This will enable us to predict the behavior of arsenic when exposed to both fly ash and sorbent which is the case under ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 428: Area 3 Septic Waste Systems 1 and 5, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 428: Area 3 Septic Waste Systems 1 and 5, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

Date: February 8, 2000
Creator: U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office
Description: This Corrective Action Decision Document identifies and rationalizes the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's selection of a recommended corrective action alternative (CAA) appropriate to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 428, Septic Waste Systems 1 and 5, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in Area 3 at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in Nevada, CAU 428 is comprised of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): (1) CAS 03-05-002-SW01, Septic Waste System 1 and (2) CAS 03-05-002- SW05, Septic Waste System 5. A corrective action investigation performed in 1999 detected analyte concentrations that exceeded preliminary action levels; specifically, contaminants of concern (COCs) included benzo(a) pyrene in a septic tank integrity sample associated with Septic Tank 33-1A of Septic Waste System 1, and arsenic in a soil sample associated with Septic Waste System 5. During this investigation, three Corrective Action Objectives (CAOs) were identified to prevent or mitigate exposure to contents of the septic tanks and distribution box, to subsurface soil containing COCs, and the spread of COCs beyond the CAU. Based on these CAOs, a review of existing data, future use, and current operations in Area 3 of the TTR, three CAAs were developed for ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Role of fly ash in heavy metal removal from flue gas. Final report, September 1, 1993--August 31, 1994

Role of fly ash in heavy metal removal from flue gas. Final report, September 1, 1993--August 31, 1994

Date: February 1, 1995
Creator: Bavarian, F.; Mahuli, S.; Ghosh-Dastidar, A.; Agnihotri, R. & Fan, L.S.
Description: The primary objective of this work is to study the fundamental phenomena involved in the sorption of trace chalcophilic elements by fly ash at high and medium temperatures. Chalcophiles are the low-boiling trace elements that are volatilized during pulverized coal combustion and are transferred to the gas phase, e.g., As, Pb, Cd and Se. The main focus of this work is investigating the sorption phenomena of a representative chalcophile, arsenic (As) on fly ashes at temperatures representative of the upper-furnace region (850--1200{degree}C) and the economizer section (375--600{degree}C). Arsenic is chosen because it is a highly toxic chalcophile and shows some affinity for fly ash but is also emitted from the stack as vapor and aerosol particles. The two temperature zones have been chosen because most of the dry-sorbent injection technologies are being developed for application in these two regions. Also, various fly ash samples from different sources are being studied because their chemical composition and subsequently their chemical sorption characteristics would show a great deal of variation depending on their source. In the first year of this project, it was proposed to conduct isothermal sorption experiments in a differential reactor system. The first year`s work was divided into two phases; ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Ohio Coal Research Consortium fourth year final summary report, September 1, 1993--August 31, 1994

Ohio Coal Research Consortium fourth year final summary report, September 1, 1993--August 31, 1994

Date: May 1, 1995
Creator: unknown
Description: As a part of its efforts to improve the use of high-sulfur Ohio coal within environmental limits, the Ohio Coal Development Office, an entity within the Ohio Department of Development (OCDO/ODOD), in late 1988 established a consortium of four Ohio universities. The purpose of the Ohio Coal Research Consortium is to conduct a multi-year fundamental research program focused on (1) the enhancement or development of dry sorption processes for the economical removal of high levels of SO{sub 2} and other pollutants and (2) an increased understanding of methods for reduction in air toxics emissions from combustion gases produced by burning high-sulfur Ohio coal. This report contains summaries of twelve studies in these areas.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Waste Remediation Activities at Elk Hills (Former Naval petroleum Reserve No. 1), Kern County, California

Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Waste Remediation Activities at Elk Hills (Former Naval petroleum Reserve No. 1), Kern County, California

Date: December 17, 1999
Creator: /A, N
Description: DOE proposes to conduct a variety of post-sale site remediation activities, such as characterization, assessment, clean-up, and formal closure, at a number of inactive waste sites located at Elk Hills. The proposed post-sale site remediation activities, which would be conducted primarily in developed portions of the oil field, currently are expected to include clean-up of three basic categories of waste sites: (1) nonhazardous solid waste surface trash scatters, (2) produced wastewater sumps, and (3) small solid waste landfills. Additionally, a limited number of other inactive waste sites, which cannot be typified under any of these three categories, have been identified as requiring remediation. Table 2.1-1 presents a summary, organized by waste site category, of the inactive waste sites that require remediation per the PSA, the ASA, and/or the UPCTA. The majority of these sites are known to contain no hazardous waste. However, one of the surface scatter sites (2G) contains an area of burn ash with hazardous levels of lead and zinc, another surface scatter site (25S) contains an area with hazardous levels of lead, a produced wastewater sump site (23S) and a landfill (42-36S) are known to contain hazardous levels of arsenic, and some sites have not yet been ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
USE OF APATITE FOR CHEMICAL STABILIZATION OF SUBSURFACE CONTAMINANTS

USE OF APATITE FOR CHEMICAL STABILIZATION OF SUBSURFACE CONTAMINANTS

Date: May 1, 2003
Creator: Bostick, Dr. William D.
Description: Groundwater at many Federal and civilian industrial sites is often contaminated with toxic metals at levels that present a potential concern to regulatory agencies. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has some unique problems associated with radionuclides (primarily uranium), but metal contaminants most likely drive risk-based cleanup decisions, from the perspective of human health, in groundwater at DOE and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund Sites include lead (Pb), arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), mercury (Hg), zinc (Zn), selenium (Se), antimony (Sb), copper (Cu) and nickel (Ni). Thus, the regulatory ''drivers'' for toxic metals in contaminated soils/groundwaters are very comparable for Federal and civilian industrial sites, and most sites have more than one metal above regulatory action limits. Thus improving the performance of remedial technologies for metal-contaminated groundwater will have ''dual use'' (Federal and civilian) benefit.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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